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Archive for September, 2011

Understanding and Treating Colic

Parenting an infant can be totally overwhelming. One of the earliest challenge many face is learning to deal with periods of intractable crying. I often speak with sleep deprived parents when they’re looking for something — anything — to stop their baby from crying. They’ve typically been told by friends of family that their baby must have “colic” and they’ve come to the pharmacy, looking for a treatment. Colic is common, affecting up to 40% of babies in the few months of life.

While distressing, colic is a diagnosis of exclusion — that it, it is given only after other causes have been ruled out (hunger, pain, fatigue, etc.). The most common definition for colic is fussing or crying for more than 3 hours per day, more than 3 days per week, for more than 3 weeks. These criteria, first proposed by Morris Wessel in 1954, continue to be used today. However, scientific evidence to explain the cause is lacking. Ideas proposed include:

  • changes in gastrointestinal bacteria/flora
  • food allergies
  • lactose intolerance
  • excess gas in stomach
  • cramping or indigestion
  • intolerance to substances in the breast milk
  • behavioural issues secondary to parenting factors

Despite its intensity, colic resolves on its own with no interventions. By three months of age, colic has resolved in 60% of infants. By four months, it’s 90%. It sounds harmless and short-lived, but colic’s ability to induce stress in parents cannot be overstated. Parents may be angry, frustrated, depressed, exhausted, or just feel guilty, ascribing their baby’s cries to some parenting fault. (more…)

Posted in: Clinical Trials, Pharmaceuticals, Science and Medicine

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Does Weight Matter?

Determining the net health effects of independent factors can be tricky, especially when those factors cannot be controlled for in experimental studies. For things like body mass index (BMI) we must rely on observational data and triangulate with multiple studies to isolate the contributions from BMI. But it can be done.

The data, however, are likely to be complex and noisy, and therefore there is plenty of opportunity for ideology to trump objectivity in interpreting the data. There are those who, for whatever reason, deny that we are having an obesity epidemic in the West, and those who deny the health implications of being overweight as an independent factor.

BMI

The terms overweight and obesity have had various definitions in the past, but in recent years the various health organizations have settled on consensus operational definitions (for obvious practical reasons). Their definition relates to body mass index, which is a person’s weight in kilograms (kg) divided by their height in meters (m) squared.

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Posted in: Public Health

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Benedetti on Placebos

There has been an ongoing debate about placebos on SBM, both in the articles and in the comments. What does it mean that a treatment has been shown to be “no better than placebo?”  If our goal is for patients to feel better and they feel better with placebos, why not prescribe them? Do placebos actually do anything useful? What can science tell us about why a patient might report diminished pain after taking an inert sugar pill? The subject is complex and prone to misconceptions. A recent podcast interview offers a breakthrough in understanding.

On her Brain Science Podcast Dr. Ginger Campbell interviewed Dr. Fabrizio Benedetti, a physician and clinical neurophysiologist who is one of the world’s leading researchers on the neurobiology of placebos. A transcript of the interview [PDF] is available on her website for those who prefer reading to listening. The information Dr. Benedetti presents and the expanded remarks by Dr. Campbell after the interview go a long way towards explaining the placebo phenomenon and its consequences for clinical medicine. Dr. Campbell also includes a handy list of references. I’ll try to provide a summary of the main points, but I recommend reading or listening to the original.

A common misconception is that the response to placebos is a purely subjective psychological response involving only the cortical level of the brain; but evidence is accumulating that real, measurable, objective subcortical neurophysiologic phenomena are involved. One of the first hints was a 1978 study showing that the placebo response to pain could be blocked by naloxone, a narcotic antagonist drug, indicating that the placebo must have actually caused an increase in endogenous opioids. (more…)

Posted in: Basic Science, Neuroscience/Mental Health

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Andrew Weil and “integrative medicine”: The ultimate triumph of quackery?

A board certification in woo?

I’ve been harshly critical of the entire concept of “integrative medicine” (IM), which has over the last few years nearly supplanted the former term used for non-science-based medicine or medicine based on prescientific ideas represented as though it were scientific medicine, “complementary and alternative medicine” (CAM). Indeed, just last week I pointed out how IM is far more about marketing than it is about science or medicine, and over the last three years I’ve been particularly harsh on the concept of “integrative oncology,” which is actually being represented as a “subspecialty” of IM. Despite the utter lack of a rationale based on science or the scientific basis of medicine, IM has still been making inroads into academic medical centers, where I tend to refer to it with the unapologetically disparaging term “quackademic medicine.” Even worse, now, increasingly, such woo has been insinuating its way into community medical centers as well.

Arguably, the man who has done more than any individual to promote the quackification of science-based medicine is Dr. Andrew Weil. (At least, I can’t think of any single person who’s done more during his lifetime to promote the infiltration of quackery into medicine. Readers are free to chime in if they know of someone who could challenge Weil for the title of King of Quackademic Medicine.) As I pointed out the last time I discussed him, Dr. Weil doesn’t really like science-based medicine. Oh, no, he doesn’t like it at all. Unfortunately, he’s been very successful in promoting quackademic medicine. He’s also arguably been the single most successful person at legitimizing what used to be viewed as quackery. Master of the domain of “integrative medicine,” having formed a model of an “integrative medicine in residency” that’s spread like kudzu through quackademia, all from his redoubt at the University of Arizona, Dr. Weil has now announced his intention for the next phase of his “integrating” pseudoscience with SBM. I learn this from The Integrator Blog, which has as a recent headline from last week Special Report: “Strategic Change in Direction” as Weil’s Arizona Center Commits to Creation of American Board of Integrative Medicine:

In a major strategic shift, the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine (ACIM) has announced that it will lead the creation of a formal specialty for medical doctors in integrative medicine. ACIM, founded by Andrew Weil, MD and directed by Victoria Maizes, MD, is in dialogue with the American Board of Physician Specialties toward establishing an American Board of Integrative Medicine. They are collaborating with leaders of the American Board of Integrative and Holistic Medicine (ABIHM). Here is the ACIM announcement, a statement from two ABIHM leaders, a brief interview with Maizes and the list of 18 founding Board members. Is this the right strategic choice? What impact will this have on integrative medicine and the broader integrative healthcare movement?

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Posted in: Medical Academia, Politics and Regulation

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Recycle

Like most people who grew up after April 22, 1970, I think it is important to be as environmentally responsible as possible.  Like many I fail miserably much of the time, but at least I feel guilty about it.  Recycling offers the opportunity to feel good about my environmental impact with little effort, since the garbage collection infrastructure in Portland makes recycling easy.

Some products are best extensively reprocessed before reused. Urine, as an example. There are proponents of topical and/or drinking urine as a treatment/cure for nearly any illnesses.  The kidneys are mostly responsible for fluid and electrolyte balance and I realize that normal urine is mostly water, salts, urea and a smattering of other very dilute molecules. I have the urine tox screen to prove it.  Urine is not a particularly noxious body fluid, but it is not high on my list of liquids to drink under normal circumstances.

Urine is mostly water but not an optimal source of water if it is your only source for fluids.  Urine drinkers love to mention the occasional trapped earthquake victim who survives, in part, from drinking their own urine.  For the first several days the urine would be dilute enough to keep people reasonably hydrated, as humans cannot concentrate urine as well as, say, a camel.  So I can see where consuming urine for a short period of time would delay progressive dehydration and death. A couple days of drinking urine neat, shaken not stirred, would be harmless and, if there were no alternative sources of water, beneficial. I do suffer from the societal taboo that piss is icky, and for aesthetic reasons urine is not something I would want to consume, even when it is referred to as its more common designation ‘Coors Light’. (more…)

Posted in: Herbs & Supplements, Science and Medicine

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Legislative Alchemy II: Chiropractic

As we learned in Legislative Alchemy I: Naturopathy, legislative alchemy is the process used by state legislatures to transform implausible and unproven diagnostic methods and treatments into legal health care practices.

Today, we review how chiropractors are faring in the 2011 state legislative sessions.

Chiropractic 101

In 1895, a self-described “magnetic healer,” Daniel David Palmer, claimed to have discovered that every person possessed an “Innate Intelligence,” defined as the body’s capacity to heal itself, which flowed from the brain out through the nerves in the spinal cord. Misaligned vertebrae impinged on nerves and interfered with the flow of Innate Intelligence, causing “95 percent of all disease.”

Palmer named these putative misalignments “subluxations,” and began teaching students how to detect and correct them based on his notion that removing this interference would return the free flow of Innate Intelligence and the body would heal itself. In other words, chiropractic was — and, as we shall see, still is — simply another form of vitalism, a long-discredited notion that illnesses are caused by a disturbance or imbalance of the body’s “vital force,” which is distinct from the body’s biochemical processes.

Palmer and his disciples were arrested for practicing medicine without a license, which led to a strategy of chiropractors lobbying state legislatures for their own chiropractic practice acts. This effort stretched from 1913, when Kansas became the first state to license chiropractors, to 1974, when Louisiana became the last.

Subluxation: it’s the law

The non-existent chiropractic subluxation remains the central tenet of the 50 state chiropractic practice acts to this day.[1]

Twenty-one state chiropractic acts mention it specifically as the basis for chiropractic practice. For example, Connecticut defines chiropractic practice as:

the science of adjustment, manipulation and treatment of the human body in which vertebral subluxations and other malpositioned articulations and structures that may interfere with the normal generation, transmission and expression of nerve impulse between the brain, organs and tissue cells of the body, which may be a cause of the disease, are adjusted, manipulated or treated.

Twenty-three states refer to its purported attributes — without actually using the “s” word. In North Carolina, chiropractic practice is defined as:

the science of adjusting the cause of the disease by realigning the spine, releasing pressure on nerves radiating from the spine to all parts of the body, and allowing the nerves to carry their full quota of health current (nerve energy) from the brain to all parts of the body.

Did they say “science”? Here’s how much science is involved in chiropractic’s core concept — there’s not even a plausible hypothesis of what a subluxation is or how it might affect human functioning.

Six states simply incorporate by reference practices and procedures taught in chiropractic schools, which remain loyal to the subluxation although some have tried to distance themselves from the word, if not the concept.

This doesn’t mean, of course, that chiropractors are permitted by law to treat any disease or condition by detecting and correcting subluxations, just most any disease or condition, as long as the problem is defined in terms of the patient’s having one or more subluxations stopping up the “flow” of “nerve energy.” Asthma, allergies, ADHD, painful periods and earaches are a few of the many conditions widely advertised as treatable by chiropractic adjustment.

You might think it would cause the chiropractic industry some alarm that legislators might wake up to the fact that subluxations don’t exist. And apparently that is the case. In a few states chiropractors are attempting to expand the chiropractic scope of practice by including authority to prescribe that former anathema to chiropractic: drugs. For years chiropractors branded themselves as doctors who treat patients “without drugs or surgery.”
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Posted in: Chiropractic, Legal, Politics and Regulation

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Some Encouraging Backlash Against Nonsense

One of the themes of SBM is that modern health care should be based upon solid scientific ground. Interventions should be based on a risk vs benefit analysis using the best available scientific evidence (clinical and basic science).

As an extension of this, the standard of care needs to be a science-based standard. Science is (or at least should be) objective and transparent, and without such standards there is no way to have meaningful quality control. Without the filter of science there is no limit to the nonsense and magical thinking that can flow into the health care system. Increasingly we cannot afford the waste of fanciful and ineffective interventions, and even if limited resources were not an issue – individual patients deserve better.

It is for these reasons that we oppose the attempts by proponents of so-called complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to erode or eliminate the science-based standard of care in medicine. Proponents differ mostly on how open they are about this goal, but there is no escaping the reality that at the heart of the very concept of CAM is at least a double standard – one in which the science-based bar for inclusion is lowered for some favored modalities.

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Posted in: Science and Medicine

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Scientific American Mind Is Not So Scientific

When Scientific American first announced that they would publish Scientific American Mind, I hurried to subscribe, thinking it would keep me informed about new developments in a field I am passionately interested in. I have enjoyed the magazine, particularly the regular columns, the news items about research findings, the reviews that alert me to books I will want to read, the “Ask the Brains” Q and A, the challenging “Head Games” quiz, and the presentation of many intriguing ideas. The board of advisers is impressive, and the columns by Christof Koch, Scott Lilienfeld, Hal Arkowitz, the Ramachandrans and others have been consistently excellent. Unfortunately, some of the other articles have descended into pop psychology, speculation, poor science and even pseudoscience. Contributing editor Robert Epstein’s articles have particularly raised my blood pressure.

Love-Building Exercises

In December 2009 I was annoyed enough to write this letter to the editor:

After reading Robert Epstein’s article in the last issue, I had to go back to the cover and verify that the word “scientific” was indeed part of the title of your magazine. The Love Building Exercises he recommends are more appropriate to a magazine of fantasy and science fiction.

Two as One — feeling that the two of you have merged?
Soul Gazing — looking into the very core of your beings?
A Mind-Reading Game — wordlessly trying to broadcast a thought to another person?
Love Aura — feeling “eerie kinds of sparks” when your palm is close to another’s?

Thought transfer? Auras? Come on! Shame on you for publishing such metaphysical pseudoscientific psychobabble!

They published my letter to the editor with the heading “Hating ‘Love’.” There was no response from the author.

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Posted in: Neuroscience/Mental Health, Science and the Media

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Survey says, “Hop on the bandwagon of ‘integrative medicine’!”

A Brief Clinical Vignette

In researching this post, I found an article published nearly two years ago in The Hospitalist entitled Growth Spurt: Complementary and alternative medicine use doubles, which began with this anecdote:

Despite intravenous medication, a young boy in status epilepticus had the pediatric ICU team at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison stumped. The team called for a consult with the Integrative Medicine Program, which works with licensed acupuncturists and has been affiliated with the department of family medicine since 2001. Acupuncture’s efficacy in this setting has not been validated, but it has been shown to ease chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, as well as radiation-induced xerostomia.

Following several treatments by a licensed acupuncturist and continued conventional care, the boy’s seizures subsided and he was transitioned to the medical floor. Did the acupuncture contribute to bringing the seizures under control? “I can’t say that it was the acupuncture — it was probably a function of all the therapies working together,” says David P. Rakel, MD, assistant professor and director of UW’s Integrative Medicine Program.

The UW case illustrates both current trends and the constant conundrum that surrounds hospital-based complementary medicine: Complementary and alternative medicine’s use is increasing in some U.S. hospitals, yet the existing research evidence for the efficacy of its multiple modalities is decidedly mixed.

My jaw dropped in horror when I read this story. Acupuncture for status epilepticus? There’s no evidence that it works and no scientific plausibility suggesting that it might work. And what does the questionable research suggesting that acupuncture might ease chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting or radiation-induced xerostomia (which, if you look more closely at the studies, it almost certainly does not, but that’s a post for another time) have to do with this case, anyway? Nothing. Worse, Dr. Rakel fell for the classic post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy; i.e., despite his disclaimer, he appears to be implying that, because the child recovered, acupuncture must have contributed to his recovery. He also repeats the classic fallacy that I’ve written about time and time again in the context of cancer therapy, namely that if a patient is using quackery as well as science-based medicine, then either it was the quackery that cured him or the quackery somehow made the conventional medical care work better.

I expect better from an academic medical center like the University of Wisconsin. Unfortunately, increasingly I’m not getting it. Quackademic medicine is infiltrating such medical centers like kudzu.
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Posted in: Faith Healing & Spirituality, Medical Academia, Science and the Media

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Dummy Medicine, Dummy Doctors, and a Dummy Degree, Part 2.1: Harvard Medical School and the Curious Case of Ted Kaptchuk, OMD (cont.)

Rave Reviews

In 1983, Ted Kaptchuk, the senior author of the recent “albuterol vs. placebo” article, and soon to become the long-time Second-in-Command of the Harvard Medical School “CAM” program, published The Web that Has No Weaver:

The book received rave reviews:

A major advance toward the synthesis of Western and Eastern theory. It will stimulate all practitioners to expand their understanding of the causes and treatment of disease.

–Paul Epstein, MD, Harvard Medical School

A lucid and penetrating exposition of the theory and practice of Chinese medicine. While the book’s rich detail makes it of great use to practicing healers, it is in its entirety very simply written, enjoyable reading for the layman…it brings a demystifying balance…Instructive, profound, and important!

Professor Martin Schwartz, University of California, Berkeley

…demystifies Oriental medicine in a remarkably rational analysis…

—Science Digest, Nov. 1982

…an encyclopedia of how to tell from the Eastern perspective ‘what is wrong.’

Larry Dossey

Dr. Kaptchuk has become a lyricist for the art of healing…

—Houston Chronicle

Although the book is explicitly detailed, it is readable and does not require previous knowledge of Chinese thought…

—Library Journal

The 2nd edition was published in 2000, to more acclaim:

…opens the great door of understanding to the profoundness of Chinese medicine.

—People’s Daily, Beijing, China

…weaves a picture…that is eminently understandable from a Westerner’s point of view…adds a valuable analysis of the current scientific understanding of how the therapies work and their effectiveness.

Brian Berman

Ted Kaptchuk’s book was inspirational in the development of my acupuncture practice and gave me a deep understanding of traditional Chinese medicine…

Dr. George T. Lewith

…a gift for all who share an interest in deep understanding of healing. This new edition is essential reading…

Michael Lerner, President, Commonweal

Even Edzard Ernst, still in his foggy period, called the 2nd edition “a brilliant synthesis of traditional and scientific knowledge…compulsory reading…”

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Posted in: Acupuncture, Book & movie reviews, Health Fraud, Medical Academia, Science and Medicine

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