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Archive for February 15th, 2013

Picking Cherries in Science: The Bio-Initiative Report

by Kenneth R. Foster & Lorne Trottier

Science-based medicine is great, but it all depends on how you evaluate the scientific evidence. A bad example is the  BioInitiative Report (BIR), an egregiously slanted review of health and biological effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) of the sort that are produced by power lines, cellular telephones, Wi-Fi, and other mainstays of modern life. When first released in 2007, the BIR quickly became a key document used by anti-EMF activists in their various campaigns. Early in January 2013, the BIR appeared in a major update, to extensive media coverage.

The BIR concerns possible biological effects and health hazards of electromagnetic fields in two very different frequency ranges: at extremely low frequencies ELF’s of the sort emitted by power lines and appliances, and at radiofrequencies (RFs) of the sort that are transmitted by mobile phones, Wi-Fi and a host of other technologies. Both ELF and RF fields (which are subsumed under the more general EMF) are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes infrared energy, light, ultraviolet energy, as well as X-rays.

ELF and RF fields are nonionizing, in that the energy of their photons is far too low to break chemical bonds, an effect that makes ionizing radiation such as X-rays so hazardous. Fields from power lines are at 50 or 60 Hz or cycles per second; those from mobile phones and other RF communications and broadcasting systems are in the range of hundreds or thousands of MHz (megahertz or million cycles per second). Simple physics tell us that a photon of 1GHz frequency has an energy of 6 millionths of an electron volt (eV), while the average thermal energy of a molecule is 0.03 eV and the ionization energy of a chemical bond is on the order of 1 eV

There are, of course, well-established hazards from excessive exposures to ELF and RF fields, which are mainly associated with electric shock (ELF) and excessive heating of tissue (RF). Such problems, however, require exposure to fields at vastly higher levels than anything that would be encountered in ordinary life. Most countries around the world have adopted roughly similar exposure limits that are designed to protect against these known hazards.

The possibility that the electromagnetic fields at much lower exposure levels can be bad for you has been a matter of public concern for many years. Countless public, scientific, and legal battles have been waged about possible health hazards produced by fields from power lines, cellular base stations, broadcasting facilities, and other technologies, despite the fact that public exposures from such technologies are invariably far below government exposure limits.
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Posted in: Science and Medicine

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