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Archive for October 10th, 2013

Acetaminophen: Still the pain reliever you should trust?

Recently ProPublica and This American Life (TAL) released the results of an investigation into acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol. TAL devoted an entire episode to the issue, and ProPublica has published several stories on acetaminophen’s toxicity, how it can cause harm, and how it is regulated.

The investigation summarizes the key “Takeaways” as follows:

  • 150 Americans die per year from accidental acetaminophen overdoses
  • The safety margin (safe dose vs. toxic dose) with acetaminophen is small
  • Both the FDA and the manufacturer, McNeil, have known about the toxicity for years
  • For over 30 years the FDA has failed to implement measures to reduce the risk of harms it knew existed
  • The manufacturer has taken steps to protect consumers but has also opposed other safety measures

While Tylenol is a single brand out of hundreds of prescription and non-prescription products that contain acetaminophen as an active ingredient, it is the brand most closely associated with the chemical. Amazingly for a drug that has no patent and lots of competition, Tylenol products are estimated to make up half of all non-prescription acetaminophen sales in the US, a testament to the power and effectiveness of marketing. (It’s also a clear refutation to alt-med arguments that unpatented products can’t be profitable, or aren’t of interest to the pharmaceutical industry.) While much of the focus of the investigation centers on the corporate behavior of Tylenol’s manufacturer, McNeil, (a division of Johnson & Johnson), it is important to keep in mind that no single company is responsible for acetaminophen sales and marketing. (more…)

Posted in: Pharmaceuticals, Politics and Regulation, Science and Medicine

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Licensing Naturopaths: the triumph of politics over science

Naturopaths shouldn’t get too excited about having a special week in their honor. The U.S. House of Representatives gave watermelons a whole month. As between naturopathy and watermelons for my good health, I’ll go with the watermelons any day. You’ll soon understand why.

Today is not my usual blogging day. But when David Gorksi announced SBM’s celebration of Naturopathic Medicine Week, I volunteered an extra post to answer the question I am sure is on everyone’s mind: How in the heck do they get away with this stuff?

The answer lies in the creation of Naturopathic Medicine Week itself: politics. Just as Sen. Barbara Mikulski turned her credulous acceptance of naturopathy into a Senate Resolution and slipped it by her Senate colleagues, clueless legislators around the country are sponsoring bills to license naturopaths, in some cases as primary care physicians. And it’s not as if these legislators don’t know they are incorporating quackery into primary care. Practices such as naturopathic “organ repositioning” (an anatomical impossibility) and Mark Crislip noted, what little data there is suggests that naturopathic primary care is associated with worse outcomes. But evidence is not necessary in the political realm. And now the political process has given naturopaths an additional incentive for licensure. They argue that the Affordable Care Act mandates reimbursement for their services. (more…)

Posted in: Cancer, Energy Medicine, Herbs & Supplements, Homeopathy, Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation, Traditional Chinese Medicine

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