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We Have to Draw the Line Somewhere

Passive acceptance of Alternative Medicine has eroded the quality of medical care in this country. With the DSHEA of 1994 and political correctness, we have lost the reverence afforded to us in times past. Our professional knowledge is called into question as our standards deteriorate. There no longer exists a line separating proven fact from speculation. There is no border separating reality from mythology. Our colleagues treat with antibiotics and homeopathy. With beta-blockers and energy fields. Qi and narcotics.

For many years, it has seemed that I was nearly alone in my skepticism. Anytime I would bring up an alternative medicine topic, (in reality: criticize it) others in my field would have a ho-hum reaction to it. It was politically incorrect to rant about the growth of alternative medicine, the growing use of herbs, and how something should be done about it. We family and internal medicine doctors are a generally easy lot to live with. We accept patients and their faults, and it is hard to suddenly become judgmental when it comes to our colleagues. I had no idea as a resident that there was so much woo in Colorado. Specifically, I had no idea how much there was at my academic institution. This was in the late 80s, early 90s! Oh my, how things have changed, and not for the better.

I was a naïve resident in 1990, when a nurse practitioner at my residency called me about one of my patients. She wanted to help a 20 year old woman stop smoking by… wait for it….Therapeutic Touch. I was post call, and had trusted this NP as she had been with the residency for many years. I said “yes, go ahead,” not knowing what exactly it entailed. When I did have time to look into it, I was appalled. I was guilty by association. The patient never returned to me, and I don’t blame her. She must have thought I believed in magic. It turns out that the School of Nursing at the University of Colorado had to be called out by the Rocky Mountain Skeptics on their aggressive promotion and advocacy of Therapeutic Touch.

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Posted in: Politics and Regulation, Science and Medicine

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