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SBM Live Event – April 17th

A panels of bloggers from SBM will be taking part in the Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism – NECSS 2010, April 17th beginning 10:00AM in New York.

There will be a 70 minute panel discussion moderated by John Snyder and featuring David Gorski, Kimball Atwood, Val Jones, and myself – Steven Novella. The topic of discussion will be the infiltration of pseudoscience into academic medicine.

This will be part of a full day of science featuring other excellent speakers, including James Randi, D. J. Grothe, Steve Mirsky, George Hrab, and Julia Galef. There will also be a live recording of the wildly popular science podcast, The Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe.

Go to www.NECSScon.org to register.

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An update on our search for new SBM bloggers

Three and a half weeks ago, Amy Tuteur announced her departure from SBM. Three weeks ago, I announced that we were recruiting new bloggers to replace Amy, to bolster areas of weakness among our bloggers, and expand our repertoire. I thank those of you who have responded.

Given that none of you have heard anything from us other than perhaps an acknowledgment of receiving your application, I thought it reasonable to give a brief update. Due to a combination of the death crud (of which those of you who are my Facebook friends may be aware), a challenging couple of weeks at work, and various other concerns, I haven’t made as much progress in evaluating potential new bloggers as I had hoped. I had hoped that we would have at least been able to start sending out an offer or two by now. All I can ask is: Be patient. And, if you know of any quality bloggers who haven’t been proposed already, please let me know. We are evaluating candidates, and it shouldn’t be long before I start communicating with the top applicants.

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Meet me in St. Louis?

I just thought I’d make a brief announcement that I’m currently in St. Louis attending the annual meeting of the Society of Surgical Oncology. If any of our St. Louis readers are attending the meeting, look me up. I’d be tickled to death to know whether any of my colleagues here are even aware of SBM, much less regular readers. (If no one is aware, though, I’ll be disappointed.) Heck, if you show me your mad skillz at writing and that you share our philosophy, maybe you can even join us as another blogger here!

Also, if anyone’s interested in attempting a meetup, let me know. I’ll be in St. Louis until Sunday morning. It may or may not be possible, given that the SSO meeting fills each day quite nicely and most evenings have something booked, including meeting up with a former postdoc of mine who happens to be at Washington University now, but you never know until you ask. Unfortunately, Saturday night probably out, unless it’s before 7 PM or after 10 PM. My mentor, Dr. Mitch Posner, is the incoming president of the SSO; so I want to go to the Presidential Banquet that evening.

Posted in: Announcements, Surgical Procedures

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The future of the Science-based Medicine blog: SBM is recruiting new bloggers

It’s been a rather eventful week here at Science-Based Medicine. I apologize that I don’t have one of my usual 4,000 word epics ready for this week. I was occupied all day Saturday at a conference at which I had to give a talk, and Dr. Tuteur’s departure produced another issue that I had to deal with. Fortunately, because Dr. Lipson is scheduled to do an extra post today, I feel less guilty about not producing my usual logorrhea. Who knows? Maybe it will be a relief to our readers too.

This confluence of events makes this a good time to take a break to take care of some blog business and make formal what I alluded to on Thursday in the comments after I announced Dr. Tuteur’s departure, namely that it’s time for us at SBM to start recruiting. Our purpose in recruiting will be to make this blog even better than it is already. We have an absolutely fantastic group of bloggers here, and it is due to their hard work and talent that SBM has become a force to be reckoned with in the medical blogosphere. Our traffic continues to grow, and reporters and even on occasion governmental officials have taken notice. That’s why Dr. Tuteur’s departure makes this a perfect opportunity to build on that record and make SBM even better and a more essential as a source of medical commentary than it is already. To accomplish this goal, it’s clear that any recruitment cannot be simply to fill in a gap in our posting schedule. I would much rather have a weekday go without a post every now and then than to recruit the wrong person to take over Dr. Tuteur’s spot. As a result, I hope to make this recruitment more strategic and to do it in a more formal manner than we have perhaps done in the past. We also plan on taking our time and therefore ask your patience.

To this end, I’m going to ask for nominations, either self-nominations or nominations of others, as suggested bloggers for SBM. Please also include a link to the nominee’s blog or, if the nominee is not a blogger or otherwise known for skeptical writings regarding medicine elsewhere (such as R. Barker Bausell), samples of his or her writing about topics relevant to SBM. I will compile the list over the next couple of weeks; our bloggers will discuss and vet the candidates; and we will decide whom we want to try to persuade to join us, either as a regular weekly blogger (currently Harriet Hall, Steve Novella, and me), an every-other-week blogger (currently Peter Lipson, Mark Crislip, Val Jones, and Joe Albietz), a monthly blogger (currently Kim Atwood), or an occasional contributor (currently Wally Sampson, David Ramey, John Snyder, Tim Kreider, and David Kroll). Finally, if you’re nominating yourself, please specify how often you are interested in contributing and tell us a bit about yourself and your background. Also realize that we do require our bloggers to write under their own names. No pseudonyms will be permitted, at least not on this blog.

So where do we need the most help? A number of you, as well as a number of SBM bloggers, came up with excellent suggestions for priority areas where our readers what to see more material or where we are weak here at SBM. These areas include, in no particular order:
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Posted in: Announcements, Science and Medicine

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Dr. Amy Tuteur has decided to leave Science-Based Medicine

The editors and crew at SBM have an announcement that needs to be made. This morning, Dr. Amy Tuteur tendered her resignation and will therefore no longer be a blogger at SBM. Some of you might already be aware of this development because Dr. Tuteur has already announced her decision on her own blog. That is why we considered it important to post an announcement here on SBM as soon as possible.

While we are sorry to see Dr. Tuteur go and wish her well in whatever future endeavors she decides to pursue, over the last several weeks it had become clear to both the editors of SBM and Dr. Tuteur herself that, although Dr. Tuteur had routinely been able to stimulate an unprecedented level of discussion regarding the issues we at SBM consider important, SBM has not been a good fit for her and she has not been a good fit for SBM. Over the last few days mutual efforts between the editors and Dr. Tuteur to resolve our differences came to an impasse. Unfortunately for all parties, that impasse appeared to be unresolvable and resulted in Dr. Tuteur’s decision to leave SBM.

As a result of Dr. Tuteur’s departure, we will be adjusting the posting schedule in order to cover her normal Thursday slot. Final decisions have not been made yet, but we expect that every weekday will continue to be covered, with at least one post per weekday. 

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The Institute for Science in Medicine enters the health care reform fray

I’ve been writing about the attempts of proponents of various pseudoscience, quackery, and faith-based religious “healing” modalities to slip provisions friendly to their interests into the health care reform bill that will be debated in the Senate beginning today. If you want to know what’s at stake, check out the first press release of a newly formed institute designed to promote science-based medicine in academia and public policy, the Institute for Science in Medicine.

It’s an embryonic institute, only recently formed by 42 physicians and scientists, several of whose names will be quite familiar to regular readers of SBM, but it’s jumping right into the fray. This is what the ISM is:

The ISM is a non-profit educational organization dedicated to promoting high standards of science in all areas of medicine and public health. We are a watchdog group of medical professionals who believe the best science available should be used to determine health policy and establish a standard of care that protects and promotes the public health. We oppose legislation that seeks to erode the science-based standard of care and expose the public to potentially fraudulent, worthless, or harmful medical practices or products.

Given how when faced with science going against them purveyors of unscientific medicine and medical beliefs try to win in politics where they can’t win in science (as my earlier post today describes for naturopaths in Ontario and the anti-vaccine movement in Oregon), just as we do on SBM, those of us who have helped to form the ISM have our work cut out for us.

Steve Novella has more.

Posted in: Announcements, Herbs & Supplements, Politics and Regulation, Public Health

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H1N1 Pandemic Update

In a special episode of the Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe podcast, I host a discussion with David Gorski, Mark Crislip, and Joe Albietz about the flu, the H1N1 “swine” flu pandemic, and the controversies surrounding the flu vaccine.

You can download or stream the episode here. You can also subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or other popular aggregators.

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Guess Who’ll Win A Nobel Prize, Win An 8GB iPod Touch

The following is an announcement from my friends at Medgadget.com:

Next Monday, the Nobel Foundation will announce the winner(s) of this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. In the following two days, two more Nobels will be revealed: in Physics and in Chemistry. Because of the success of last year’s inaugural Guess-A-Nobel Contest, we decided we’ll repeat this event annually until there is no more science worthy of the prize. This year we’re giving out three 8GB Apple iPod Touch devices to those who correctly guess in each of the three science categories. Because we profile a good deal of apps for the iPhone/Touch platform, we thought this might be a useful tool beside all the fun it can provide on the off time. Furthermore, if someone does manage to guess all three correctly, he or she will be getting the souped-up 64 GB version of the iPod device with all the trimmings.


Here are the rules of the game: (more…)

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New SBM Resource – and a Word on Vaccines

We frequently receive requests from readers, our colleagues in medicine or fellow science bloggers for the best reference site that has all the information they need on a specific topic. There are many excellent resources on the net, but nothing I know of that quite puts it all together in that way – one-stop shopping for up-to-date information on the topics we are most concerned with.

So we decided to create just such a resource.

You will now see at the top of this page a new link for SBM Topic-Based Reference which leads to our new section by that name. There you will see the list of topics we are currently working on, and once they are complete more will be added. As of today only one topic is reasonably complete, Vaccines and Autism.

The format (which is subject to change as we build and use the resource) is as follows: We start with a brief topic overview. This is not meant to be a thorough discussion of the topic, but a quick summary to get people started. This is followed by an index of all SBM posts on that topic and then links to outside resources that we recommend.

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Posted in: Announcements, Science and the Media, Vaccines

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Dr. Joe Albietz joins SBM!

One month ago, I was honored to take part not just in the Science-Based Medicine Conference at TAM 7 in Las Vegas but to be a part of the Anti-Anti-Vax Panel. I was even more honored to be on the same panel as Dr. Joe Albietz, a pediatric intensivist from the University of Colorado who organized a fund-raising drive to benefit the Southern Nevada Health District and contribute to the vaccination of children in a region where the vaccination rate is, unfortunately, low. I’m even more pleased that Dr. Albietz has agreed to join SBM as a regular blogger. Here’s a little bit about Joe:

Joseph Albietz, M.D. is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado, Denver, and The Children’s Hospital. In addition to his service in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, his time is divided between translational research in the field of pediatric pulmonary hypertension and medical education where he acts as the pediatric intensive care associate fellowship director. Dr. Albietz graduated from the University of Missouri at Kansas City and completed his residency training in pediatrics and a fellowship in pediatric critical care at the University of Colorado, Denver. He is board certified in Pediatrics and Pediatric Critical Care.

In addition to writing for Science Based Medicine Dr. Albietz also periodically contributes to the James Randi Educational Foundation’s (JREF) Swift Blog and coordinated JREF’s vaccine drive to benefit the Southern Nevada Health District.

Dr. Albietz’s first blog post is scheduled for Friday, August 21. In the meantime, please welcome him to the fold. He’s a great addition to our crew of bloggers.

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