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Archive for Naturopathy

The Quack Full Employment Act

Quacks, charlatans and snake oil salesmen are closely watching “The Colorado Natural Health Consumer Protection Act,” Senate Bill 13-215 (SB 215) as it wends its way through the Colorado Legislature. I imagine a few felons about to be released from prison are keeping tabs on the bill too, for reasons we’ll get to in a minute. SB 215 passed the Senate on Tuesday. It will now go on to the House, where it has the support of Rep. Joann Ginal, the mover and shaker behind a bill giving “naturopathic doctors” a right to practice, House Bill 13-1111 (HB 1111). That bill passed the House and is now parked in the Senate awaiting committee assignment.  Apparently, critical thinking skills have abandoned the state capital. Things are looking grim.

If the “Colorado Natural Health Consumer Protection Act” passes, Colorado will become one of a handful of states where anyone can practice medicine. Of course, these laws don’t come out and say that exactly. In fact, the Colorado bill states that if you don’t have a medical license you cannot practice medicine, which in Colorado is defined to include:

Holding out one’s self to the public within this state as being able to diagnose, treat, prescribe for, palliate, or prevent any human disease, ailment, pain, injury, deformity, or physical or mental condition, whether by the use of drugs, surgery, manipulation, electricity, telemedicine, the interpretation of tests, including primary diagnosis of pathology specimens, images, or photographs, or any physical, mechanical, or other means whatsoever; . . . Suggesting, recommending, prescribing, or administering any form of treatment, operation, or healing for the intended palliation, relief, or cure of any physical or mental disease, ailment, injury, condition, or defect of any person . . .

But, as we shall see, what SB 215 actually does is allow rank amateurs to diagnose and treat just about anyone for any disease or condition with means of no known safety or effectiveness. In other words, they can practice medicine, it’s just quack medicine. At the same time, the bill strips away important consumer protections. And guess who’s supporting it? The Colorado Medical Society, although I suppose we can be disappointed but not surprised. The Colorado Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics is remaining neutral. As I said, critical thinking skills have decamped from Denver.

Pay attention folks. Passage of this bill will energize the Health Freedom crowd. They’ll be in your state soon.

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Posted in: Energy Medicine, Health Fraud, Herbs & Supplements, Homeopathy, Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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Homeopathic regulation diluted until no substance left

Homeopathy is quackery but it is perfectly legal to prescribe homeopathic products and to sell them directly to consumers in the United States as well as other supposedly civilized countries such as the United Kingdom and Germany. This makes as much sense as allowing the sale of batteries that don’t produce electricity.

What makes this state of affairs even stranger is that homeopathic products are classified as drugs under U.S. law. Does this mean that they undergo the same pre-market approval process and are subject to the same post-market requirements as pharmaceutical drugs? No, not by a long shot. In fact, the federal government and the FDA have pretty much handed regulation of homeopathic products over to their manufacturers.

How did this happen?

In 1938, Congress passed the Food, Drugs and Cosmetics Act. The Act’s principle author was Senator Royal Copeland, a physician who practiced homeopathy. He managed to include all articles monographed in the Homeopathic Pharmacopeia of the United States (HPUS) in the definition of drugs within the FDCA, although why he did so remains in dispute. The HPUS is a source for monographs, identity, methods of manufacture, standards and controls and potency levels of homeopathic products, both prescription and OTC. (The vast majority of homeopathic products are OTC.) In short, if the product is in the HPUS, it’s legal.

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Posted in: History, Homeopathy, Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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What Does ND Mean?

Chronic Lyme disease almost certainly does not exist, but a growing number of doctors are diagnosing and treating it with long-term antibiotics and other remedies. They are known as LLMDs (“Lyme Literate” medical doctors). This subject has been covered repeatedly on Science-Based Medicine, here, here, here, here, and elsewhere.

I have a correspondent who joined a Yahoo group for Lyme disease (Northern VA Lyme). She shared with me a message to that group that listed the LLMDs in their area. On that list was Patricia Slusher, ND, CN (naturopath, certified nutritionist). Other messages confirmed that Slusher is treating patients for “chronic Lyme disease.” One message specifically described the treatments prescribed by Patricia Slusher:

For the first 3 weeks my Lyme protocol consist of taking 3 supplements from Percision [sic] Herbs, LLC; LYX, Spirex and Puricell and spending 30 minutes 2X a week getting a Quad Zapper treatment. After the 3 weeks, my test for Lyme was negative. But bartonella was still positive. She has changed my supplements to taking Drainage-tone and Amoeba-chord by energetix and 15 minutes 1x a week of the Quad Zapper to fight the bartonella. I have doing [sic] this protocol for approx. 3 weeks. Along with this protocol I am on several other homeopathic supplements to address some of my symptoms, swollen lymph nodes, nerve pain (feels like someone is stabbing me with an ice pick or bugs crawling on me), numbness, inflammation, low vitamin D, etc. Also, supplements to raise the functioning level of my adrenals and kidneys. [Note: the Quad Zapper is a version of one of the infamous (more…)

Posted in: Energy Medicine, Naturopathy

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Warts

As this is published I am finishing the last day of a 12 day stretch covering my partner while he is off trying to get MDRTB and typhoid fever.  He is in India. I may have to autoclave him when he returns before I let him in the hospital.  Double the work means double the fun, but free time goes down by the power.  Same thing happens with the kids.  If you have two kids, the work squares, three kids, the work cubes.  A linear change in one domain leads to exponential change in other domains.  I am sure that phenomena has a name that one of our readers will know.

I lack the mad typing skills of other contributors and it usually takes me at least a week to carefully construct the spelling errors and grammatical faux paux for which I am justly famous.  And then I have to come up with content to surround the faulty English.  This week I have little time and so a ‘fun’ post.

When I make rounds it is not unusual for people to ask questions about their health and their family.  I learned long ago to ask why they want an answer to a particular question so I do not inadvertently offend a colleague.  When I offend I like to be advertent.  Years ago I was asked what I thought of hyperbaric oxygen, and I replied that it is great for the bends but otherwise mostly serves to enrich the hyperbaric doctors.  Why do you ask?  I am the new director of the hyperbaric program, was the reply.  Open mouth and insert foot.

So recently a nurse asked me if duct tape would remove warts.  Wary, I asked why, and she showed me a huge wart on her hand.  I have used duct tape for many purposes; few home repairs cannot be (temporarily) accomplished with duct tape. But treating warts?  Do you use the tape as a way to yank the wart out by its roots?  Got me.  I gave my best Gallic shrug and went looking for information. (more…)

Posted in: Clinical Trials, Naturopathy

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Fighting Back

As I hope I demonstrated in Legislative Alchemy: Naturopathy 2013, below, licensing “naturopathic doctors,” especially as primary care physicians, is a bad idea.  Unfortunately, the only people usually interested in opposing their licensing efforts are medical doctors and their organizations.  Of course, this allows naturopaths to pretend they are the victims of the evil, Big Pharma-controlled medical-industrial complex which kills and maims vast numbers of people every year.  This distracts legislators from the real issues, such as whether they are qualified to do what they want to do (answer: no)  and whether people really want an ND to provide their care (answer: very, very  few).

I happen to think that legislators should be fully informed about things such as how naturopaths are educated, what they do in actual practice, and what thier beliefs  about medical care are.  So I created a website to inform them about these issues and to inform the public as well, so they too will be inspired to oppose naturopathic licensing.  It also has suggestions for opposing naturopathic licensing as well as addtional sources of information and downloads of materials you can use.  (I thank SBM’s Kimball Atwood, M.D., for permission to use some of the wonderful work he has done on naturopathy.)

The website is titled, most creatively, “Oppose Naturopathic Licensing!” And you can find it here: http://www.no-naturopaths.org/ If those who value science and the rational application of science to medical care don’t work to stop CAM provider licensing, the spread of pseudoscience and quackery will only increase.  And that demeans all scientific endeavors.

 

Posted in: Announcements, Naturopathy

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Legislative Alchemy: Naturopathy 2013

A fresh season of state legislative sessions is upon us and with it comes the ubiquitous attempts by purveyors of so called “complementary and alternative medicine” (or “CAM”) to join the health care provider fraternity. Via the magic of legislative alchemy, state legislatures transform pseudoscientific diagnoses (e.g., “chronic yeast overgrowth”) and treatments (e.g., homeopathy) into faux, but legal, health care. Once the imprimatur of legitimacy is bestowed by the state in the form of a health care practice act tailored to their special brand of quackery, these newly licensed health care providers are free to foist their practices onto an unsuspecting public and charge them for the privilege. All of this is done under the false assumption that such legislation is necessary to protect the public health, safety and welfare.

We might well want to consider how far this whole thing is going. Will practitioners of CAM split into an ever-expanding number of CAM provider guilds, all with their own practice acts? First, chiropractors were the only CAM practitioners who managed to get themselves licensed in all 50 states. Then along came acupuncturists, who are now licensed to practice in over 40 states. A few states license homeopaths. Some states licensed naturopaths early on. Now the naturopaths, licensed in 16 states, are in a full court press to catch up and legitimize themselves with licenses to practice “naturopathic medicine.”

Why? Because, according to Lorilee Schoenback, ND, a Vermont practitioner and American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP) Board member:

If the law [the Affordable Care Act, or ACA] is implemented as intended NDs in 16 states will immediately be covered by insurance.

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Posted in: Herbs & Supplements, Homeopathy, Legal, Naturopathy, Pharmaceuticals, Politics and Regulation, Public Health

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Here we go again: A bill licensing naturopaths rears its ugly head in Michigan

If I’ve pointed it out once, I’ve pointed it out a thousand times. Naturopathy is a cornucopia of almost every quackery you can think of. Be it homeopathy, traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurvedic medicine, applied kinesiology, anthroposophical medicine, reflexology, craniosacral therapy, Bowen Technique, and pretty much any other form of unscientific or prescientific medicine that you can imagine, it’s hard to think of a single form of pseudoscientific medicine and quackery that naturopathy doesn’t embrace or at least tolerate. Indeed, as I’ve retorted before to apologists for naturopathy who claim that it is scientific, naturopathy can never be scientific as long as you can’t have naturopathy without homeopathy and naturopaths embrace homeopathy. Unfortunately, naturopaths have over the years been having some success in persuading state legislatures to license naturopaths, in some cases even giving them the privilege of being considered primary care practitioners. It’s part of an organized effort, too, and I don’t expect that effort to let up. True, the governor of Massachusetts did veto a naturopathic licensing bill that came across his desk recently, but no one following this issue expects the naturopaths to let up. As Jann Bellamy put it, the naturopaths will be back. They always are.

Indeed, in the wake of the failure to pass a naturopathic licensing bill in Massachusetts, Michael Cronin, the president of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP) lamented:
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Posted in: Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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Naturopaths push for licensing in Massachusetts (again)

I have some good news and some bad news about a Massachusetts naturopathy practitioner licensing bill.

First the bad news: the bill passed both the Massachusetts House and Senate in December of last year.

Now, I am certainly no expert in the arcane workings of the Massachusetts legislature, but after doing a bit of research I’ve come to wonder if the way the bill passed was entirely above board. I’ll spare you most of the details, but here’s what I found out. See if you don’t agree with me that the whole thing smells a bit fishy.

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Posted in: Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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SCAMlandia

I quite like Portlandia. I find it funny and it captures a part of Portland. I recognize large swaths of the city’s culture in the show. Other representations of the city I recognize less. Sunset publishes beautiful photographs of the NW, but when I look at the photos I think, that section of the city never looks that good. It is quite wonderful how Photoshop can improve on reality.

Like most major cities, Portland has a monthly magazine, Portland Monthly. The city represented in that magazine is mostly alien to me. I look at the advertisement, the articles, the photographs, and wonder when did Portland become a city with an average 7 figure income? The Portland in which I grew up and currently live is rarely found in the pages of Portland Monthly. If you are extremely well to do, I suppose you are in the demographic Portland Monthly. But when I flip through the pages of the magazine, I see little I recognize, but I have never completely abandoned the hippie/grunge aesthetic of my younger days.

Every January they have the best Doctors issue* and this year, for the first time, they offer The Portland Alternative Medicine Guide. Well, less a guide and more an extended infomercial filled with ‘facts’ that deserve the quotes. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Dentistry, Energy Medicine, Homeopathy, Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation, Science and Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine

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Naturopathy Embraces the Four Humors

The ancient Greeks posited a system of health and disease based on the four humors: blood, phlegm, black bile and yellow bile. According to this system, health is defined as a harmony of these four humors and disease is caused by an imbalance among them. Restore the balance, and health is restored. Bleeding is a familiar example of humoral medical treatment based on a diagnosis of an “excess” of blood. Fortunately, the humoral system of diagnosis and treatment died out with the advent of modern scientific medicine.

But as David Gorski asked (sarcastically, of course) in his presentation on quackademic medicine at CSICon in October, if supposedly ancient philosophies of diagnosis and treatment such as Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda are so beloved by CAM proponents, despite their implausibility and lack of evidence of effectiveness, why not the humoral model of health and disease? Why not include humorism in the CAM practitioner armamentarium?

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Posted in: Faith Healing & Spirituality, History, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation, Religion, Traditional Chinese Medicine

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