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The 2nd Yale Research Symposium on Complementary and Integrative Medicine. Part I

March 4, 2010

Today I went to the one-day, 2nd Yale Research Symposium on Complementary and Integrative Medicine. Many of you will recall that the first version of this conference occurred in April, 2008. According to Yale’s Continuing Medical Education website, the first conference “featured presentations from experts in CAM/IM from Yale and other leading medical institutions and drew national and international attention.” That is true: some of the national attention can be reviewed here, here, here, and here; the international attention is here. (Sorry about the flippancy; it was irresistible)

I’ve not been to a conference promising similar content since about 2001, and in general I’ve no particular wish to do so. This one was different: Steve Novella, in his day job a Yale neurologist, had been invited to be part of a Moderated Discussion on Evidence and Plausibility in the Context of CAM Research and Clinical Practice. This was not to be missed.

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Posted in: Chiropractic, Clinical Trials, Health Fraud, Herbs & Supplements, Homeopathy, Medical Academia, Medical Ethics, Nutrition, Politics and Regulation, Science and Medicine

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A Welcome Upgrade to a Childhood Vaccine – PCV 13

Children aren’t supposed to die.  That so many of us accept this statement without a blink is remarkable and wonderful, but it is also a very recent development in human history.  Modern sanitation, adequate nutrition, and vaccination have largely banished most of the leading killers of children to the history books.  Just look at the current leading causes of childhood death in developing countries to see how far these relatively simple interventions have taken us.

As we have systematically removed the leading infectious killers of children from prominence, other organisms have naturally risen to the top of the list.  This has lead some to the fatalistic (and mistaken) conclusion that we are simply opening up niches to be inevitably filled by other virulent organisms.  This assumes that there is some mandated quota of say, meningitis, that children must suffer every year, and if one organism doesn’t meet this quota then another will fill it.  Were this the case, after vaccination we’d expect to see a shift in the causes of meningitis, but at best a transient drop in the total number of cases per year as other bugs step in to pick up the slack of their fallen, virulent, meningitis-inducing brethren.  Such is not the case.

Though new organisms are now the leading causes of invasive bacterial infections in children, and we have indeed seen some increases in non-vaccine targeted strains, as I’ll discuss below, the total number of such infections has dropped precipitously.  It’s fair to say that the vaccination program has done a remarkable job improving a child’s chance of surviving to adulthood in good health.  However, no one in their right mind would argue that the current state of affairs, as good as it is, is good enough, and so we have shifted our sights to the current leading cause of invasive bacterial infections in children, Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumo, or pneumococcus). (more…)

Posted in: Public Health, Science and Medicine, Vaccines

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Meet me in St. Louis?

I just thought I’d make a brief announcement that I’m currently in St. Louis attending the annual meeting of the Society of Surgical Oncology. If any of our St. Louis readers are attending the meeting, look me up. I’d be tickled to death to know whether any of my colleagues here are even aware of SBM, much less regular readers. (If no one is aware, though, I’ll be disappointed.) Heck, if you show me your mad skillz at writing and that you share our philosophy, maybe you can even join us as another blogger here!

Also, if anyone’s interested in attempting a meetup, let me know. I’ll be in St. Louis until Sunday morning. It may or may not be possible, given that the SSO meeting fills each day quite nicely and most evenings have something booked, including meeting up with a former postdoc of mine who happens to be at Washington University now, but you never know until you ask. Unfortunately, Saturday night probably out, unless it’s before 7 PM or after 10 PM. My mentor, Dr. Mitch Posner, is the incoming president of the SSO; so I want to go to the Presidential Banquet that evening.

Posted in: Announcements, Surgical Procedures

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Science-based Chiropractic: An Oxymoron?

I spent 43 years in private practice as a “science-based” chiropractor and a critic of the chiropractic vertebral subluxation theory. I am often asked how I justified practicing as a chiropractor while renouncing the basic tenets of chiropractic. My answer has always been: I was able to offer manipulation in combination with physical therapy modalities as a treatment for mechanical-type back pain—a service that was not readily available in physiotherapy or in any other sub-specialty of medicine.

If I had it to do over again, however, I would study physical therapy rather than chiropractic. Considering the controversy that continues to surround the practice of chiropractic, I would not recommend that anyone spend the time, effort, and money required to earn a degree in chiropractic. Physical therapy, which is now beginning to include spinal manipulation in its treatment armamentarium, may offer better opportunity for those interested in manual therapy. Properly-limited, science-based chiropractors are now essentially competing with physical therapists who use manual therapy. Unfortunately, only a few chiropractors have renounced the vertebral subluxation theory, making it difficult to find a “good chiropractor.” I consider physical therapy to be more progressive and more evidence based. For this reason, I generally recommend the manipulative services of a physical therapist rather than a chiropractor.

There are some science-based chiropractors who use manipulation appropriately, but until the chiropractic profession abandons the implausible vertebral subluxation theory and is defined according to standards dictated by anatomy, physiology, and neurology, I would not describe it as a science-based profession.
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Posted in: Chiropractic

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Acupuncture for Depression

One of the basic principles of science-based medicine is that a single study rarely tells us much about any complex topic. Reliable conclusions are derived from an assessment of basic science (i.e prior probability or plausibility) and a pattern of effects across multiple clinical trials. However the mainstream media generally report each study as if it is a breakthrough or the definitive answer to the question at hand. If the many e-mails I receive asking me about such studies are representative, the general public takes a similar approach, perhaps due in part to the media coverage.

I generally do not plan to report on each study that comes out as that would be an endless and ultimately pointless exercise. But occasionally focusing on a specific study is educational, especially if that study is garnering a significant amount of media attention. And so I turn my attention this week to a recent study looking at acupuncture in major depression during pregnancy. The study concludes:

The short acupuncture protocol demonstrated symptom reduction and a response rate comparable to those observed in standard depression treatments of similar length and could be a viable treatment option for depression during pregnancy.

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Posted in: Acupuncture, Clinical Trials, Neuroscience/Mental Health, Obstetrics & gynecology

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Zeo Personal Sleep Coach

 Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care
The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath
Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course,
Chief nourisher in life’s feast.   
 -William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Zeo

The company that makes the Zeo Personal Sleep Coach  kindly sent me one of their devices to try out. It’s a nifty little gadget, and if you are a techno geek, you would probably love it. It’s a fascinating toy; but for insomnia, there’s no evidence that it provides any benefit over standard treatment with sleep logs and sleep hygiene advice.

Polysomnography is done overnight in a sleep lab and costs around $1000. It records multiple parameters: EEG, EKG, EMG, breathing, O2, CO2, and limb movements. It is most commonly used to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a serious condition that is linked to hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, stroke, and increased mortality. OSA can be effectively treated with CPAP and other measures. About 50% of snorers have sleep apnea. We typically think of it as a disease of obese, loudly snoring older men, but even young children can have it: snoring is probably never normal in children and should be investigated.

The Zeo is the first sleep monitor available for consumers to use at home. It doesn’t pretend to do what polysomnography does. It can’t diagnose sleep apnea. It is billed as an educational and motivational tool, not intended for the diagnosis or treatment of sleep disorders. A unit that looks sort of like an alarm clock sits on your bedside table and communicates wirelessly with a comfortable soft elastic headband that positions embedded sensors over your forehead to pick up your brain waves. (more…)

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In desperate times, what works, wins

When one of the worst natural disasters in history hit Haiti earlier this year I worried what sorts of  alternative medicine “help” the Haitians might have thrust upon them.  From around the world, health care workers with expertise in trauma and disaster relief offered their skills, realizing that anyone who came to Haiti must bring with them a lot of value—taking up valuable space, food, and water without providing significant benefit will hurt far more than help.

But others have used this disaster to benefit themselves and their own quasi-medical cults.   There have been many reports of the Church of Scientology’s faith healers walking around in yellow t-shirts trying to “assist” people’s nervous systems.  Homeopaths, the folks who sell water panaceas, have been offering to “help” as well.

Poor and less-industrialized countries are a target-rich environment for alternative medicine cults, but may conversely be a tough nut to crack.  Since many alternative medicines don’t require an industrial base, they can be made readily available anywhere.  Homeopathy is just water;  if a homeopath can simply provide a water remedy that contains fewer fecal coliforms than the local water, they can get away with quite a bit before people realize they’ve been duped.  In fact, unless a population has had exposure to real medicine, the altmed folks can fool people for a very long time. But hungry people can also be very pragmatic, and they know that eating grass will only give a false satiety.  The same may be true of medical help.

When face with an immediate threat to life and limb,  most people find out rather quickly the difference between real and fake medicine.  In rich countries such as the U.S., people have the luxury of indulging in alternative remedies.  We have good public sanitation and vaccination and so suffer more from diseases of excess rather than those of desperate poverty.  If you have access to food and clean water, so much that you even consume to excess, then you may have time to explore fake cures.  But when the feces hits the rotating blades… (more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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The future of the Science-based Medicine blog: SBM is recruiting new bloggers

It’s been a rather eventful week here at Science-Based Medicine. I apologize that I don’t have one of my usual 4,000 word epics ready for this week. I was occupied all day Saturday at a conference at which I had to give a talk, and Dr. Tuteur’s departure produced another issue that I had to deal with. Fortunately, because Dr. Lipson is scheduled to do an extra post today, I feel less guilty about not producing my usual logorrhea. Who knows? Maybe it will be a relief to our readers too.

This confluence of events makes this a good time to take a break to take care of some blog business and make formal what I alluded to on Thursday in the comments after I announced Dr. Tuteur’s departure, namely that it’s time for us at SBM to start recruiting. Our purpose in recruiting will be to make this blog even better than it is already. We have an absolutely fantastic group of bloggers here, and it is due to their hard work and talent that SBM has become a force to be reckoned with in the medical blogosphere. Our traffic continues to grow, and reporters and even on occasion governmental officials have taken notice. That’s why Dr. Tuteur’s departure makes this a perfect opportunity to build on that record and make SBM even better and a more essential as a source of medical commentary than it is already. To accomplish this goal, it’s clear that any recruitment cannot be simply to fill in a gap in our posting schedule. I would much rather have a weekday go without a post every now and then than to recruit the wrong person to take over Dr. Tuteur’s spot. As a result, I hope to make this recruitment more strategic and to do it in a more formal manner than we have perhaps done in the past. We also plan on taking our time and therefore ask your patience.

To this end, I’m going to ask for nominations, either self-nominations or nominations of others, as suggested bloggers for SBM. Please also include a link to the nominee’s blog or, if the nominee is not a blogger or otherwise known for skeptical writings regarding medicine elsewhere (such as R. Barker Bausell), samples of his or her writing about topics relevant to SBM. I will compile the list over the next couple of weeks; our bloggers will discuss and vet the candidates; and we will decide whom we want to try to persuade to join us, either as a regular weekly blogger (currently Harriet Hall, Steve Novella, and me), an every-other-week blogger (currently Peter Lipson, Mark Crislip, Val Jones, and Joe Albietz), a monthly blogger (currently Kim Atwood), or an occasional contributor (currently Wally Sampson, David Ramey, John Snyder, Tim Kreider, and David Kroll). Finally, if you’re nominating yourself, please specify how often you are interested in contributing and tell us a bit about yourself and your background. Also realize that we do require our bloggers to write under their own names. No pseudonyms will be permitted, at least not on this blog.

So where do we need the most help? A number of you, as well as a number of SBM bloggers, came up with excellent suggestions for priority areas where our readers what to see more material or where we are weak here at SBM. These areas include, in no particular order:
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Changing Climate, Changing Infections

I will state my bias up front.  I am convinced by the preponderance of data in favor of man made global warming.  At the most simplistic level, I can’t see how converting humongous tons of fossil fuel into C02 and dumping it into the the atmosphere cannot have effects on the climate.  To my mind its like determining vaccine efficacy or evolution.  Plausible mechanism(s), good basic science, multiple studies using different lines of evidence that all come to the same conclusion.  There are lots of fine points and nuances to be worked out, but the basic truth is reasonable and well defined. Infectious diseases lend some validation to the concept that world is warming, since with global warming will come a variety of infectious diseases.
It is one big IF THEN statement.  IF global warming, THEN infections.  Of course the if the IF is not true, then the THEN doesn’t follow.
There is the weather, which the Action Channel News never seems to get right, and I will spare you the Mark Twain quote even though I think he is our best writer ever,  and there is the climate, the summation of weather over time.
Interestingly, infections have probably altered climate for short periods of times.  Through history humans burned trees releasing C02, chopped down forests for agriculture and raised animals, releasing methane.  As humans populations increased, both C02 from burning and methane from animals increased as well.  Every now and then large numbers of people have died off.  It happen when Columbus et. al. brought infections to the New World and when plague came to the Old.  People died.  Maybe 90% in the Americas (estimates vary widely) and 2/3′s of Europe died.  As a result, burning and agriculture decreased, decreasing emissions and forests grew back, sequestering C02.  And temperature rise slowed or decreased (http://stephenschneider.stanford.edu/Publications/PDF_Papers/Ruddiman2003.pdf).
“Abrupt reversals of the slow CO2 rise caused by deforestation correlate with bubonic plague and other pandemics near 200-600, 1300-1400 and 1500-1700 A.D. Historical records show that high mortality rates caused by plague led to massive abandonment of farms. Forest re-growth on the untended farms pulled CO2 out of the atmosphere and caused CO2 levels to fall. In time, the plagues abated, the farms were reoccupied, and the newly re-grown forests were cut, returning the CO2 to the atmosphere…Moreover, if plague caused most of the 10-ppm CO2 drops… it must also have been a major factor in the climatic cooling that led from the relative warmth of 1000 years ago to the cooler temperatures of the Little Ice Age.”
Like all good scientists, he notes the problems with his conclusions
“A more complete assessment of the role of plague- driven CO2 changes in climate change during the last millennium would require a narrowing of uncertainties in both the spatial and temporal occurrence of plague and in the amount of farm abandonment (and reforestation), as well as a resolution of the inconsistencies among the CO2 trends from different Antarctic ice cores.”
This kind of study will never be reported in the Atlantic; too much nuance.
It is not the correction for global warming I would suggest, an Earth Abides die off of humans.  But it is an fascinating association between infectious human deaths and global warming.
As the weather changes, for a week, a season, or a over longer period of time, the incidence and distributions of  infections change.  Infections could increase or decrease due to something as simple as temperature or humidity.
Or it could be more complex.  Increase rainfall could lead to more food, which could lead to a boom in the rodent population leading to more interactions of humans and mice and the next thing you know you have bubonic plague in India or Hanta virus outbreak in the four corners of the US.
The daily weather makes a difference in infection risk.  My favorite example is Legionella pneumonia, which increases shortly after thundershowers and humid weather.  It explains why we do not have a lot of Legionella in the NW despite all the rain; it is rarely hot and humid.
In Philadelphia  Legionella
“Cases occurred with striking summertime seasonality. Occurrence of cases was associated with monthly average temperature (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per degree Celsius, 1.07 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.09]) and relative humidity (IRR per 1% increase in relative humidity, 1.09 [95% CI, 1.06-1.12]) by Poisson regression analysis. However, case-crossover analysis identified an acute association with precipitation (odds ratio [OR], 2.48 [95% CI, 1.30-3.12]) and increased humidity (OR per 1% increase in relative humidity, 1.08 [95% CI, 1.05-1.11]) 6-10 days before occurrence of cases.”
I ask the housestaff to look for Legionella after thundershowers and I usually get a case or two, although it may just be due to increased diagnostic testing.
Can you catch a cold when the weather is cold? Maybe.  It has been a topic of interest for years (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2279651/)
“The average outdoor temperature decreased during the preceding three days of the onset of any RTIs, URTI, LRTI or common cold. The temperature for the preceding 14 days also showed a linear decrease for any RTI, URTI or common cold.  (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18977127).”
More interesting are the infections associated with El Nino oscillations, where the ocean temperatures vary on a 3 to seven to year cycle, leading to alternating wet and dry weather.  As a result
“In North America, El Niño creates warmer-than-average winters in the upper Midwest states and the Northwest, thus reduced snowfall than average during winter. Meanwhile, central and southern California, northwest Mexico and the southwestern U.S. become significantly wetter while the northern Gulf of Mexico states and Southeast states (including Tidewater and northeast Mexico) are wetter and cooler than average during the El Niño phase of the oscillation. Summer is wetter in the intermountain regions of the U.S. The Pacific Northwest states, on the other hand, tend to experience dry, mild but foggy winters and warm, sunny and early springs.”
Changes due to the El Nino lead to changes in the incidence of a huge variety of infections: an example, I think, from WHO.
Climate change will affect the distribution of disease vectors such as insects and snails.  Vectors may thrive with increased temperatures or they may die off, but more likely the vectors, like mosquitos, will move.  It has been estimated that half of everyone who has every died has died from a mosquito borne illness (I admit I heard this numoerous times at ID lectures but do not have reference, at least there is a solution . http://mashable.com/2010/02/12/mosquito-death-ray-video/).  As it gets warmer, mosquitos can either go up in elevation or North.  It seems that they are doing both.
- Dengue has appeared at higher altitudes than previously reported in Costa Rica (at 1,250m),and in Colombia and India (at 2,200m).The previous range was temperature limited to approximately 1,000 metres above sea level.
- In Mexico, the dengue vector (Aedes aegypti) has been detected at 1,600 metres; transmission of dengue was unknown above 1,200m before 1986. There have been cases of dengue near or above the altitude or latitude limit of transmission and would be vulnerable to the small increases in temperature that have occurred across these regions.
- Other examples of climate-related changes in the prevalence or distribution of pathogens and their vectors include the resurgence of Mediterranean spotted fever in Spain and Italy, the recent epizootic of African horse sickness in Iberia,the resurgence of plague in parts of southern Africa,increased incidence and geographic spread of algal blooms, outbreaks of opportunistic infections among seals,and the spread and establishment of pathogens and vectors in Switzerland.  http://archive.greenpeace.org/climate/impacts/erwin/3erwin.html
- Dengue has, by serology, infected 40% of the populations of Brownsville Texas, as the disease slowly moves north.
“In the fall of 2004, during a period of endemic dengue transmission, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in these two cities,4 and dengue incidence and prevalence were measured. In Brownsville, the incidence was 2%, which, if extrapolated to the 2005 population of the city (using the 95% confidence interval), projected between 837 and 5,862 recent infections. Similarly, the prevalence was 40%, with a range from 56,948 to 75,372; these values are relatively similar to those obtained from Brownsville in 2005. http://www.ajtmh.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/361″
More than mosquito born illnesses are changing in prevalence.  Hanta is increasing in Belgium.  There has been increased temperature which has lead to increased broadleaf trees, with increased seeds, with increased voles, which carry Hanta, which infected humans to cause renal failure (http://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/8/1/1).
Oceans are getting warmer and supporting infections.  Vibrio was not found in Alaskan oysters as the water was too cold.  The water temperature was always less than 15 C.  No longer.  The mean temperature has increased each year since 1997  and now supports the growth of V. parahaemolyticus with resultant outbreaks (http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/353/14/1463).  Many other infectious diseases are increasing as well http://www.thebulletin.org/web-edition/columnists/laura-h-kahn/the-threat-of-emerging-ocean-diseases.
However, not all is doom and gloom.  Some infections may fade with global warming. For example, RSV may be disappearing as England warms.
“The seasons associated with laboratory isolation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (for 1981–2004) and RSV‐related emergency department admissions (for 1990–2004) ended 3.1 and 2.5 weeks earlier, respectively, per 1°C increase in annual central England temperature ( and .043, respectively). Climate change may be shortening the RSV season. http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/500208.”
Diseases that may increase in the US or become endemic again include malaria, dengue, and Leishmaniasis.  A 4 degree rise in temperature could allow dengue to exist as far north as Winnipeg and malaria to be in all of Europe. Seems to be a good trade off to me: more dengue and malaria, less RSV.
Good times for an infectious disease doctor.
These studies are representative of the literature, not a comprehensive review of the topic.  Personally, I find this adjunctive data compelling  support of global warming, at least over recent times (deliberately worded to not commit to the meaning of recent.)  This does not include all the other potential interactions between human behaviors and changes in the weather to result in an increase in infectious diseases.  Even simple local changes can lead to the unexpected increase in the risk of diseases.
“Adjustable rate mortgages and the downturn in the California housing market caused a 300% increase in notices of delinquency in Bakersfield, Kern County. This led to large numbers of neglected swimming pools, which were associated with a 276% increase in the number of human West Nile virus cases during the summer of 2007.”   http://www.cdc.gov/eid/content/14/11/1747.htm
All the neglected pools became mosquito breeding grounds, and the disease spread was exacerbated in part by a drought that altered bird populations from resistant finches to susceptible sparrows that were not immune to west nile, allowing the disease to spread.  The result, I suppose, of failed flock immunity.
Imagine how war, human migration, starvation will interact with climate change to increase or alter the spread of malaria, Tb and some infection that no one can predict.  If H1N1 proved anything, it is whatever new infection will sweep  across the county, it will not be the infection we predict. Who would have thought in 1989 that the next decade would see West Nile virus, never seen the the US, arrive to the continent in a migrating goose and become endemic.
Maybe its just the weather, the season, or the climate.  I think these are a few interesting infectious disease associations that lend credence to climate change.

“Conversation about the weather is the last refuge of the unimaginative.” – Oscar Wilde

I will state my bias up front.  I am convinced by the preponderance of data in favor of man made global warming.  At the most simplistic level, I can’t see how converting humongous tons of fossil fuel into CO2 and dumping it into the the atmosphere cannot have effects on the climate.  To my mind its like determining vaccine efficacy or evolution.  Plausible mechanism(s), good basic science, multiple studies using different lines of evidence that all come to the same conclusion.  There are lots of fine points and nuances to be worked out, but the basic truth is reasonable and well defined. Infectious diseases lend some validation to the concept that the world is warming, since with global warming comes a variety of infectious diseases.

It is one big IF:THEN statement.  IF global warming, THEN infections.  Of course  if the IF is not true, then the THEN doesn’t follow.

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Why You Can’t Depend On The Press For Science Reporting

I admit that the title of this post is a little inflammatory, but it’s frustrating when reporters call for input and then proceed to write unbalanced accounts of pseudoscientific practices. A case in point – my last post described a conversation I had with a reporter about energy medicine. My interviewee was very nice and seemed to “track” with me on what I was saying. I did my level best to be compelling, empathic, and fair – but in the final analysis, not a single word of what I said made it into her article. For fun, I thought you’d like to compare what I said, with the final product.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Disease has always been with us, but modern, Western medicine is only a few hundred years old.

Before germ theory and pharmaceutical research, the human race devised countless strategies to relieve pain, banish illness and prolong life. Southern Marylanders are keeping a few of these ancient disciplines alive, insisting they have much to teach us, even in a scientific age. (more…)

Posted in: Energy Medicine, Science and the Media

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