Search Results for "naturopathy"

  1. Naturopathy and science
    Naturopathy has been a recurrent topic on this blog. The reasons should be obvious. Although homeopathy is the one woo to rule them all in the U.K. and much of Europe, here in the U.S. homeopathy is not nearly as big a deal. Arguably, some flavor of naturopathy is the second most prevalent “al…
  2. Naturopathy for allergies
    Naturopathy is an unusual chimera.  It is basically a collection of old fashioned medical superstitions presented under a veneer of highly speculative, quasi-scientific assertions.  But given its popularity, it is important, from time to time, to evaluate specific claims made by this particular no…
  3. Modern shamanism—naturopathy for hypertension
    I’m a primary care physician. What I, other internists, pediatricians, and family medicine docs do is prevent and treat common diseases. When we get to diseases that require more specialized care, we refer to our specialist colleagues. There is a movement afoot to broaden the role of naturo…
  4. CAM on campus: Naturopathy
    The latest event sponsored by “integrative medicine” proponents on my medical school campus featured the naturopath “Dr.” PB, a 2003 graduate and valedictorian from Bastyr University. Advertisements all over campus billed the lecture as “Stress, nutrition, and the GI tract…
  5. Naturopathy and Liberal Politics: Strange Bedfellows
    Yesterday’s post by Wally Sampson and an offline discussion with David Gorski have moved me to post something that I wrote in 2001. At the time, I was a member of the Massachusetts Special Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medical Practitioners. I’ve previously mentioned that e…
  6. What naturopaths say to each other when they think no one’s listening
    The true test of a man’s character is what he does when no one is watching. — John Wooden   Regular readers might have gathered from reading this blog that we are not particularly fond of naturopaths. Actually, naturopaths themselves might be perfectly nice people; rather it’s naturopath…
  7. Connecticut “modernizes” naturopathic scope of practice
    Legislative Alchemy Naturopathy has been legal in Connecticut for almost 90 years, but with a scope of practice limited to counseling and a few treatments like physiotherapy, colonic hydrotherapy and “natural substances.” There was no specific authority to diagnose and treat. All of tha…
  8. Quackademia update: The Cleveland Clinic, George Washington University, and the continued infiltration of quackery into medical academia
    Quackery has been steadily infiltrating academic medicine for at least two decades now in the form of what was once called “complementary and alternative medicine” but is now more commonly referred to as “integrative medicine.” Of course, as I’ve written many times before, what “integra…
  9. Bad News and Good News from Down Under: Science-Based Medicine in Australia
    The bad news: in a disturbing attempt to woo customers, some Australian pharmacists are offering in-store consultations with naturopaths. The good news: Australian skeptics and supporters of science have had a lot of recent successes in combatting quackery. Non-Doc in a Box In an article in the Aus…
  10. Rationalizing the Ridiculous
    Pictured: Cutting-edge medicine I remain flummoxed. How do physicians and health care systems, trained in all the sciences that lie at the heart of medicine, justify the use of pseudo-medical interventions with no basis in reality? Rationalization. Making excuses: a defense mechanism in which cont…
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