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Did Facebook and PNAS violate human research protections in an unethical experiment?

Facebookfail

Ed. Note: NOTE ADDENDUM

I daresay that I’m like a lot of you in that I spend a fair bit of time on Facebook. This blog has a Facebook page (which, by the way, you should head on over and Like immediately). I have a Facebook page, several of our bloggers, such as Harriet Hall, Steve Novella, Mark Crislip, Scott Gavura, Paul Ingraham, Jann Bellamy, Kimball Atwood, John Snyder, and Clay Jones, have Facebook pages. It’s a ubiquitous part of life, and arguably part of the reason for our large increase in traffic over the last year. There are many great things about Facebook, although there are a fair number of issues as well, mostly having to do with privacy and a tendency to use automated scripts that can be easily abused by cranks like antivaccine activists to silence skeptics refuting their pseudoscience. Also, of course, every Facebook user has to realize that Facebook makes most of its money through targeted advertising directed at its users; so the more its users reveal the better it is for Facebook, which can more precisely target advertising.

Whatever good and bad things about Facebook there are, however, there’s one thing that I never expected the company to be engaging in, and that’s unethical human subjects research, but if stories and blog posts appearing over the weekend are to be believed, that’s exactly what it did, and, worse, it’s not very good research. The study, entitled “Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks“, was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), and its corresponding (and first) author is Adam D. I. Kramer, who is listed as being part of the Core Data Science Team at Facebook. Co-authors include Jamie E. Guillory at the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, University of California, San Francisco and Jeffrey T. Hancock from the Departments of Communication and Information Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. (more…)

Posted in: Clinical Trials, Computers & Internet, Neuroscience/Mental Health, Science and the Media

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The Great and Powerful Oz versus science and research ethics

That Dr. Mehmet Oz uses his show to promote quackery of the vilest sort is no longer in any doubt. I was reminded yet again of this last week when I caught a rerun of one of his shows from earlier this season, when he gazed in wonder at the tired old cold reading schtick used by all “psychic mediums” from time immemorial, long before the current crop of celebrity psychic mediums, such as John Edward, Sylvia Browne, and the “Long Island Medium” Theresa Caputo, discovered how much fame and fortune they could accrue by scamming the current generation of the credulous. Speaking of Theresa Caputo, that’s exactly who was on The Dr. Oz Show last week (in reruns), and, instead of being presented as the scammer that she is, never was heard even a hint of a skeptical word from our erstwhile “America’s doctor,” who cheerily suggested that seeing a psychic medium scammer is a perfectly fine way to treat crippling anxiety because, well, Caputo claims that it is. Even worse, apparently it wasn’t even the first time that Dr. Oz had Caputo on his show, and Caputo wasn’t even the first psychic whose schtick he represented as somehow being a useful therapeutic modality for various psychological issues. “Crossing Over” psychic John Edward was there first in a segment Oz entitled Are Psychics the New Therapists? I could have saved him the embarrassment and simply told him no, but apparently Oz is too easily impressed. As I said before, if he’s impressed by clumsy cold readers like Browne, Caputo, and Edward, it doesn’t take much to impress him. Also, apparently his producers aren’t above editing science-based voices beyond recognition to support their quackery.

I was further reminded how Dr. Oz promotes quackery by an article in Slate yesterday entitled Dr. Oz’s Miraculous Medical Advice: Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain. I suppose it would be mildly hypocritical of me to snark at the rather obvious “Wizard of Oz” jokes aimed at Dr. Oz. After all, I’ve used the same joke myself at one time or another and, in light of the Slate.com article, couldn’t resist using it in the title of my post. However, I wasn’t about to let that distract me from the article itself, which is very good. The reason is that there are two aspects to Dr. Oz’s offenses against medical science. There is the pure quackery that he features and promotes, such as psychic scammers like John Edward and Theresa Caputo, faith healing scammers like Dr. Issam Nemeh, and “alternative health” scammers like reiki masters, practitioners of ayruveda, Dr. Joe Mercola, who was promoted as a “pioneer” that your doctor doesn’t want you to know about. Never was it mentioned that there are very good reasons why a competent science-based physician would prefer that his patients have nothing to do with Dr. Mercola, who runs what is arguably the most popular and lucrative alternative medicine website currently in existence and manages to present himself as reasonable simply because he is not as utterly loony as his main competition, Mike Adams if NaturalNews.com (who has of late let his New World Order, anti-government, “Obama’s coming to take away your guns” conspiracy theory freak flag fly) and Gary Null.
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Posted in: Clinical Trials, Science and the Media

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