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Gulf War Illness

One-fourth of the veterans of the 1990-91 Gulf War complain of persistent memory and concentration problems, chronic headaches, widespread pain, gastrointestinal problems, and other chronic abnormalities not explained by well-established diagnoses. Treatments are ineffective and symptoms do not improve over time. Gulf War Syndrome or Gulf War Illness is a controversial diagnosis, and some have questioned whether it really exists. Now a new report from the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses has concluded that Gulf War Illness is real and that it is probably attributable to pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and pesticide exposures.

Its major conclusions:

  • Gulf War illness is a serious condition that affects at least one fourth of the 697,000 U.S. veterans who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War.
  • Gulf War illness fundamentally differs from trauma and stress-related syndromes described after other wars.
  • Evidence strongly and consistently indicates that two Gulf War neurotoxic exposures are causally associated with Gulf War illness: 1) use of pyridostigmine bromide (PB) pills, given to protect troops from effects of nerve agents, and 2) pesticide use during deployment.

The Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses was mandated by Congress and appointed in 2002. The report, published November 17, 2008, is an exhaustive review of all available data, including some that is unpublished. It runs to 454 pages, has multiple authors and consultants, lists 1840 references and has multiple appendices. I can’t pretend to have mastered all the information, but I have read enough to understand the basis of their conclusions. They are based on good evidence and logic, but they leave me with some doubts.
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Women in Medicine

Why aren’t there more women in science and medicine? Just because we lack certain anatomical dangly bits, does that mean we’re less capable? Apparently Harvard’s president Lawrence H. Summers thought so. In a classic case of foot-in-mouth disease, he suggested that innate differences between men and women might be one reason fewer women succeed in science and math careers. His comments (in 2005) predictably set off a media feeding frenzy. I won’t even attempt to get into that nature/nurture controversy. Whatever the statistical generalities, the fact is that individual women can and do succeed in those careers. What really matters is whether qualified women today have a fair opportunity to choose their profession and rise in it.

Something very interesting is happening in medicine. It’s happening slowly, quietly, and steadily, with no help from affirmative action programs.

At the beginning of the 20th century about 5 percent of the doctors in the United States were women. In 1970, it was still only 7 percent. By 1998, 23 percent of all doctors were women, and today, women make up more than 50 percent of the medical student population. In 1968 only 1.2% of practicing dentists were women. By 2003, 17% of dentists were women, and 35% of dentists in new active private practice were female. (more…)

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