Articles

Posts Tagged Politics and Regulation

California Acupuncture Board: a Mockery of Consumer Protection

Many of the specific issues that the Governor and the Legislature asked the Commission to review have festered because the [California] Acupuncture Board has often acted as a venue for promoting the profession rather than regulating the profession.

– Little Hoover Commission, Regulation of Acupuncture: A Complementary Therapy Framework: September 2004, page 63.

On March 12, 2012, during a brief Sunset Review hearing, the California Senate Committee on Business, Professions and Economic Development asked the California Acupuncture Board (the Board) to respond to a set of harsh criticisms.

It is not the first time that the dysfunctional Board — which falls under the Department of Consumer Affairs — is being scrutinized by the legislator. The Board has a long history of operating in an inefficient manner, misreading its governing statutes, and potentially endangering the public by refusing to promulgate regulations concerning the sterilization of acupuncture needles or the wear of medical gloves by practitioners.

In the past, members and affiliates have even been investigated for taking bribes and selling licensing exam answers. The Board was replaced several times in order to clean up the quasi-anarchic and corrupt practice of acupuncture and Oriental medicine in California.

This time, the Senate Committee listed 10 major issues in a Background Paper, which is a worthwhile read for those interested in the regulation of acupuncture. The Senate expressed serious concerns about many administrative, educational, licensing, enforcement, consumer protection and budgetary matters. In response, the Board Chair and Executive Director offered little explanation. The Board now must respond to the Background Paper in specifics.
(more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Health Fraud, Politics and Regulation, Public Health

Leave a Comment (17) →

Not to worry! Chiropractic Board says stroke not a risk of cervical manipulation.

Back in January, the Connecticut Board of Chiropractic Examiners held a four-day hearing to decide whether chiropractors must, as a part of the informed consent process, (1)warn patients about the risk of cervical artery dissection and stroke following neck manipulation and (2) give patients a discharge summary listing the symptoms of stroke.1 On June 10th, the Board of issued a written opinion that stroke or cervical artery dissection is not a risk of cervical spine manipulation, so no warning is necessary. Presumably, although it is not specifically mentioned in the decision, no discharge summary is required because, if there is no risk of a stroke after neck manipulation, what would be the point?

Background

Janet Levy and Britt Harwe are two Connecticut women who suffered strokes resulting from neck manipulation by chiropractors. That’s not just their lay opinion, it’s the opinion of their respective treating physicians, right there in the medical records.

Each decided that some good should come of their unfortunate situations, so each formed a non-profit and began warning patients of the risk of stroke following manipulation. Victims of Chiropractic Abuse, Levy’s organization, put giant ads on the sides of busses in Bridgeport, CT., much to the chagrin of the folks at the University of Bridgeport. Within the hallowed halls of the University (Go Purple Knights!) is a College of Chiropractic, a College of Naturopathic Medicine, and the Acupuncture Institute. The chiropractors demanded that the ads be taken down, which got exactly nowhere.

Some chiropractors also began harassing Levy and Harwe, calling them Nazis and KKK members, for example, and threatening their personal safety and that of their families.(What is it with the pseudoscience crowd and calling people Nazis? Perhaps, having used up their entire supply of imagination creating their nostrums, they are reduced to these tired tropes.) The FBI recommended Levy and Harwe have one of the harassers arrested, which they did, and that calmed things down for a while. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Politics and Regulation

Leave a Comment (199) →