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Posts Tagged Study Design

Why Do They Do Studies Like This?

A recently published study claims to have shown that a proprietary mixture of velvet bean and Chlorophytum borivilianum improves sleep quality. The journal, Integrative Medicine Insights, is online, peer-reviewed, PubMed indexed, open-access, and it charges authors $1848.00 to publish their article. It advertises editorial decisions in 3 weeks and publication in 2 weeks after acceptance. I can see two reasons why authors might be willing to pay that much for publication: to speed the process of getting important research results out to the public, or because their research is poor quality and they know it would be rejected by other journals.

The quality of this study is unfortunately typical of much of the research on alternative medicine.

Description of Study

The full text is available for download here.  The title is “A Dietary Supplement Containing Chlorophytum Borivilianum and Velvet Bean Improves Sleep Quality in Men and Women.” They gave a proprietary supplement mixture to 18 young healthy subjects with self-reported impairment of sleep quality (defined as routine difficulty falling asleep, waking more than twice during the night, and awaking in the morning feeling tired) and had them fill out a questionnaire about sleep quality before and after the trial. They also measured heart rate, blood pressure, CBC, metabolic panel, and lipid panels.
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Posted in: Clinical Trials, Herbs & Supplements

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Science-Based Medicine 101: How To Establish A Source’s Credibility

I thought I’d do a little SBM 101 series for our lay readers. Forgive me if this information is too basic… at least it’s a place to start for those who are budding scientists and critical thinkers. :)

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Which news source do you trust more: The New York Times or The National Enquirer? Which news reporter would you trust more: Charlie Gibson or Jerry Springer? As it turns out, medical journals and science researchers run the gamut from highly credible and respected to dishonest and untrustworthy. So as we continue down this road of learning how to evaluate health news, let’s now turn our attention to pillar number one of trustworthy science: credibility.

In medical research, I like to think of credibility in three categories:

1. The credibility of the researcher: does the researcher have a track record of excellence in research methodology? Is he or she well-trained and/or have access to mentors who can shepherd along the research project and avoid the pitfalls of false positive “artifacts?” Has the researcher published previously in highly respected, peer reviewed journals?

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Posted in: Science and Medicine, Science and the Media

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