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Tonsillectomy Indications and Complications

Tonsillectomy remains a common surgical procedure with over half a million cases in the US per year, the most common surgical procedure in children. The indications and effects of tonsillectomy remain a matter of research and debate, as is appropriate. It is also a subject of popular misinformation and alarmism.

A recent article by Seth Roberts raises many of the issues with tonsillectomy, but also reveals the pitfalls of non-experts trying to understand the clinical literature and the effects of bias on evaluating a complex medical question. Throughout the article Roberts displays a persistent bias toward downplaying the benefits and exaggerating the risks of tonsillectomy, while accusing the medical establishment of doing the exact opposite.  The purpose of this post is not to defend the practice of tonsillectomy but to review some of the relevant issues and explore how bias can affect an assessment of the evidence.

Indications for Tonsillectomy

Roberts tells the story of Rachael who was offered tonsillectomy for her son and so did some research on her own. She looked on Pubmed (a good place to start) and found a Cochrane review from 2009.

The Cochrane Review that Rachael found (“Tonsillectomy or adeno-tonsillectomy versus non-surgical treatment for chronic/recurrent acute tonsillitis”) was published in 2009. It describes four experiments that compared tonsillectomy to the care a sick child would otherwise receive. All four involved children like Rachael’s son, and all four had similar results: Tonsillectomies had only a small benefit. (Contrary to what Rachael was told.) During the year after random assignment to treatment — the point at which some children had their tonsils removed, other children did not — children whose tonsils were removed had one less sore throat than children who were not operated on (two instead of three for children like Rachael’s son).

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Posted in: Clinical Trials, Surgical Procedures

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