Search Results for "dshea"

  1. The Dietary Supplement Safety Act of 2010: A long overdue correction to the DSHEA of 1994?
    BACKGROUND: A BAD, BAD LAW One of the themes of this blog has been how, over the last couple of decades, the law has been coopted by forces supporting “complementary and alternative” medicine (CAM) in order to lend legitimacy to unscientific and even pseudoscientific medical nonsense. Wh…
  2. DSHEA: a travesty of a mockery of a sham
    In 1994, Congress enacted the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA). This act allows for the marketing and sales of “dietary supplements” with little or no regulation. This act is the work of folks like Tom Harkin (who took large contributions from Herbalife) and Orrin Hatc…
  3. Phenibut Is Neither Proven Nor Safe As A Prosocial Wonder Drug
    Editor’s note: With Mark Crislip away on yet another vacation, we present an inaugural guest post from Abby Campbell, a practicing MD, Ph.D and contributor at HealthyButSmart.com. Welcome Abby! Ball-and-stick diagram of the phenibut molecule On average for the past year, phenibut has been ty…
  4. What are health professionals telling consumers about dietary supplements?
    Is that pharmacist making an evidence-based recommendation? The popularity of dietary supplements continues to grow. A few weeks ago I described how dietary supplements have become a $34 billion industry, despite the fact that there’s very little evidence to support their use. While there are ab…
  5. FTC Homeopathy Win
    I love to see a regulatory agency actually do its job. Especially within medicine, where it is most important, the lack of political will seems to get in the way of properly regulating health care products and services in the way that most consumers assume they are regulated. Homeopathy is perhaps …
  6. Supplements: Still popular despite little evidence they’re useful
    Despite the marketing, there is no need for you to take most supplements. And no-one needs coconut oil chews. As healthcare systems struggle to cope with growing and aging populations, there is renewed interest in eliminating wasteful, and possibly harmful, care. The Choosing Wisely campaign sugge…
  7. Natural Health Products: Loosely regulated, little evidence of benefit, and an industry intent on preserving the status quo
    Shouldn’t you know that the pills you are paying for are safe, and actually do something? This week’s post will revisit a topic I recently covered, but it’s time-sensitive and needs your input. Health Canada, the Canadian equivalent to the US Food and Drugs Administration, is con…
  8. Fixing the supplement market for consumers
    Unsubstantiated claims could be on their way out in Canada When it comes to regulating and selling dietary supplements, should consumer interests be higher priority than those of manufacturers? While regulations are seemingly created to protect consumers, governments around the world have consiste…
  9. Kratom: another dangerous “natural” remedy
    Kratom (Mitragyna speciose) is a tropical tree from Southeast Asia whose leaves are traditionally chewed or prepared as a powder. Native populations chew the leaves to reduce fatigue when doing manual labor, such as working on rubber plantations. It is also used in cultural performances and consume…
  10. Supplements, Lies, and a Lengthy Transcript
    Thanks, Congress, for making bull testicles available as a dietary supplement! On October 21, 1993, there was a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee for Labor and Human Resources, with the long-winded title: Examining How the Federal Government Should Regulate the Marketing and Use of Dietary …
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