Search Results for "dshea"

  1. The Dietary Supplement Safety Act of 2010: A long overdue correction to the DSHEA of 1994?
    BACKGROUND: A BAD, BAD LAW One of the themes of this blog has been how, over the last couple of decades, the law has been coopted by forces supporting “complementary and alternative” medicine (CAM) in order to lend legitimacy to unscientific and even pseudoscientific medical nonsense. Wh…
  2. DSHEA: a travesty of a mockery of a sham
    In 1994, Congress enacted the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA). This act allows for the marketing and sales of “dietary supplements” with little or no regulation. This act is the work of folks like Tom Harkin (who took large contributions from Herbalife) and Orrin Hatc…
  3. Supplements, Lies, and a Lengthy Transcript
    Thanks, Congress, for making bull testicles available as a dietary supplement! On October 21, 1993, there was a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee for Labor and Human Resources, with the long-winded title: Examining How the Federal Government Should Regulate the Marketing and Use of Dietary …
  4. Where science meets supplements
    Various herbal remedies and supplements. For those of you that missed the Science-Based Medicine day at NECSS last week, I’ve put the highlights in the following post: The supplement industry is big business, and the popularity of these products seems to keep growing. I once worked at a sma…
  5. A Harris Poll on “Alternative Medicine”
    One can only imagine how annoyed Twain would have been had he known about opinion polls. Mark Twain popularized the phrase, “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and polls and surveys.” (He may have said “statistics” at the end, but I think this version works a…
  6. Separating Fact from Fiction in the Not-So-Normal Newborn Nursery: Chiropractic and Brachial Plexus Injury
    Newborn demonstrating a classic brachial plexus injury Thanks to a hot tip from a follower on Twitter, I’ve once again found myself neck deep in chiropractic propaganda involving the care of a pediatric patient. The case as presented involves, among numerous specious assumptions, claims of s…
  7. Regulating CAM Aussie Style
    CAM proponents view National Health Interview Surveys recording the supposed popularity of CAM, an amorphous conflation of anything from conventional medical advice to mythical methods, as an invitation to unleash even more unproven remedies on the public. My interpretation is quite different. I se…
  8. Is it ethical to sell complementary and alternative medicine?
    Legal to sell, yes. But ethical to sell? Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is no longer fringe, and anything but the mom-and-pop image that manufacturers carefully craft. CAM is big business, and most Americans today take some sort of supplement. The impetus for my blogging (and tilting…
  9. Puritan’s Pride Vitamin Advisor Gives Questionable Advice
    The Puritan’s Pride website has a Vitamin Advisor that claims to provide a personalized supplement plan, with expert recommendations chosen just for you. In my opinion it is deceptive, designed not to provide evidence-based personalized health advice, but to sell their products; and one can o…
  10. The consumer lab rat: More questions about supplement safety
    Do you take a vitamin or dietary supplement? Over half of all American adults do, making this a $30 billion dollar business. Many of us even take supplements in the absence of any clear medical or health need. I’m often told it’s a form of nutritional “insurance” or it’…
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