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Chronic Lyme Disease – Another Negative Study

Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete bacteria that causes Lyme disease.

Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete bacteria that causes Lyme disease.

While Lyme disease itself is a real and often serious infectious illness, the existence and proper treatment of so-called chronic Lyme disease is dubious, and some would say controversial. However, like many controversies we cover, the science itself is not very controversial, but the topic is made so by a persistent minority of outliers who refuse to accept the scientific consensus.

The issue has been raised yet again by a study published recently in The New England Journal of Medicine: “Randomized Trial of Longer-Term Therapy for Symptoms Attributed to Lyme Disease.” The study was negative, but I will get into the details below.

Lyme disease

Lyme in an infection caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi, and related species. In Europe the infecting species are B. afzelii and B. garinii. These bacteria are spirochetes, which refers to their spiral shape. They are related to the bacterium which causes syphilis, Treponema pallidum, which is also a spirochete.

Syphilis and Lyme both have three stages of illness – a primary infection, secondary symptoms, and then a persistent tertiary syndrome. With Lyme disease, stage 1 involves local infection, including headache, fever, chills, and local arthritis. Stage 2 is disseminated Lyme, including the classic target- or bullseye-shaped rash at the site of the bite, pain, weakness, fatigue, and diffuse arthritis. Stage 3 is persistent late stage infection, and includes ongoing stage 2 symptoms, heart involvement, and neurological involvement. (more…)

Posted in: Lyme

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Chiropractic and Stroke: No Evidence for Causation But Still Reason for Concern

neck adjustment
Can neck manipulation (by chiropractors or by other practitioners) cause strokes? Many of us think it can, but definitive proof is lacking. A recently published study looked at the available evidence. A systematic review found a small association between stroke and chiropractic care but concluded that the association was spurious and that there was no evidence for causation. My colleagues and I have written about this subject several times; some of the links are listed here. I certainly agree that there is no definitive evidence for causation, but I think there is evidence to support a strong enough probability of causation to constitute a good reason to avoid neck manipulation. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic

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NCCIH Strategic Plan 2016-2021, or: Let’s try to do some real science for a change

NCCIH
It’s no secret that we at Science-Based Medicine (SBM) are not particularly fond of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). Formerly known as the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and before that the Office of Alternative Medicine, NCCIH has been the foremost government agency funding research into quackery for the last 24 years, and, of course, that’s the reason we at SBM have been harshly critical of NCCIH since SBM’s inception. Basically, NCCIH not only funds studies of dubious “alternative” therapies, but it also promotes quackery by funding “fellowships” at various institutions to teach “integrative medicine,” or, as we like to call it, “integrating” quackery with real medicine.

Indeed, back in 2009, when President Barack Obama first took office, Steve Novella and I both suggested that the time was ripe for NCCIH to be defunded and its functions allowed to revert back to the already existing Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health. We were under no illusions that this would happen, given that NCCIH always had a powerful protector in the man who was arguably more responsible for creating NCCIH and guarding it against all attempts at defunding or, even worse, forcing it to do more rigorous science, woo-loving Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA). Harkin is no longer in the Senate, having retired at the end of 2014, but NCCIH is still with us, and the nature of government makes it very much that, unless someone with power is willing to expend serious political capital to eliminate it, NCCIH will be with us always, no matter how much it tries to change its name to eliminate anything implying pseudoscience.

So those of us who recognize that NCCIH was created to promote the “integration” of “outside of the mainstream” or “unconventional” treatments (the vast majority of which are quackery) into real medicine have to learn to live with NCCIH and, as much as it might gall us, to try make lemonade out of the lemon by prodding it to doing some actual rigorous science on “complementary and alternative medicine” that have at least a modicum of biological plausibility and avoid wasting taxpayer money on fairy dust treatments whose precepts either violate the laws of physics (e.g., reiki, homeopathy, and other “energy” medicine) or depend on nonexistent anatomy or physiology (e.g., reflexology, craniosacral, traditional Chinese medicine tongue diagnosis).

This brings me to something I saw on the NCCIH Director’s Blog late last week, a post by the director Josephine Briggs, Requesting Comments on NCCIH’s Draft Strategic Plan. Patriotic US citizen and advocate of SBM that I am, how could I turn down such a request? Kimball Atwood didn’t shirk from such a request back when Dr. Briggs was asking for comments on the NCCAM 2011-2015 strategic plan, nor did I.

In fact, you, too, can comment as well. The deadline is April 15.
(more…)

Posted in: Basic Science, Clinical Trials, Politics and Regulation

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April Fool Cannot Surpass SCAM

Stick some coffee up the tailpipe and you've got yourself some complementary and alternative auto care!

Stick some coffee up the tailpipe and you’ve got yourself some complementary and alternative auto care!

It’s April Fools’ day in the US of A. One of the internet traditions is to come up with a story that is weird or unlikely, but not so weird or unlikely that it is not believable, in order to fool people that the story is real.

I gave it the old SBM try, I really did, but I couldn’t do it. I wanted to come up with a SCAM therapy so weird, so unlikely, that I could not find an example of it actually being practiced.

It can’t be done. Like a Trump utterance*, you can’t invent a SCAM (Supplements, Complementary and Alternative Medicine) that someone, somewhere, has already pulled out of, er, well, thin air and are using it on patients.

Of course, what would you expect given that many SCAMs were in fact, pulled out of, er, well thin air. Think chiropractic and DD Palmer, iridology by August von Peczely, and reiki by Mikao Usui. Making up fantastical stuff is what they do.

But even within the spectrum of pseudo-medicine there are those are practices and papers that are so bizarro they should be an April Fools’ joke. But are not. It may be a matter of taste, what one person considers wack-a-loon another would find imminently reasonable. There are certainly assigned delegates that prove that assertion. But even within the wack-a-loon world of SCAM, there are those practices and papers that are more wack-a-loon than others and should be April Fools’ jokes. Maybe it is like more unique. Unique is one of a kind, so something can’t be more one of a kind. More wack-a-loon? Such is the world of SCAM. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Energy Medicine, Homeopathy, Medical devices, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation, Science and Medicine

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Regulating CAM Aussie Style

640px-Flag_of_Australia.svg
CAM proponents view National Health Interview Surveys recording the supposed popularity of CAM, an amorphous conflation of anything from conventional medical advice to mythical methods, as an invitation to unleash even more unproven remedies on the public. My interpretation is quite different. I see the same figures as proof that we are doing too little to protect the public from pseudoscience.

In fact, state and federal governments are acting as handmaidens to the CAM industry by legalizing practices and products that have insufficient proof of safety and efficacy and, in some cases, are so scientifically implausible that they can never meet that standard. The federal government keeps “integrative” medicine centers at major academic institutions and private foundations afloat with taxpayer money by funding research that has failed to improve public health or the treatment of disease, despite seemingly endless trials, because “more research is needed”.

As we shall see, Australia has a more effective regulatory system for dealing with CAM. And the advocacy group Friends of Science in Medicine (FSM), an organization with goals similar to our own Society for Science-Based Medicine, is keeping the government on its toes, investigating violations of the law on its own and reporting them. We in the US could learn something from their two recent successful campaigns attacking misleading health claims. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Diagnostic tests & procedures, Guidelines, Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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What Not To Say When Someone Is Sick

If your friend is getting chemotherapy, they need sympathy and support - not advice.

If your friend is getting chemotherapy, they need sympathy and support – not advice.

I understand the impulse, but you are well-advised to resist it. When someone you know has a serious illness, maybe even dying, you want to say something to them that is helpful, positive, and hopeful. The hopeful tone takes away some of the sting and the awkwardness of not knowing what to say to someone who just told you they are dying.

The problem with this approach is that you risk making the other person feel worse just so you can make yourself feel temporarily better, to ease the discomfort of that one encounter. It is really easy to rationalize this behavior to yourself; you are just trying to be helpful.

Sick shaming

There are multiple problems with this approach, however. The first is that it makes the person with an illness feel terrible. As Steven Thrasher said in a recent excellent editorial (which you should read in full): (more…)

Posted in: Commentary

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Carotid Artery Stenosis: Surgery, Stent, or Nonsurgical Stroke Prevention?

One treatment for carotid artery stenosis: stent placement

One treatment for carotid artery stenosis: stent placement

The carotid artery in the neck is a common site of atherosclerosis. As plaque builds up, it leaves less room for blood flow and can cause strokes through clotting or embolization. Carotid stenosis is defined as a greater than 70% narrowing of the lumen (the space through which the blood flows in an artery). It can cause symptoms, including transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and minor strokes; but it is frequently asymptomatic. It can be treated with carotid endarterectomy (CEA) or carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAAS). There has been much discussion about which procedure is better and when it is better not to do either. (more…)

Posted in: Diagnostic tests & procedures, Surgical Procedures

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Vaxxed and the Tribeca Film Festival: How Robert De Niro learned the hard way about Andrew Wakefield and the antivaccine movement

Robert De Niro made a massive mistake last week.

Robert De Niro made a massive mistake last week. Fortunately, he started to make up for it.

One of the disadvantages of only doing one blog post a week here at Science-Based Medicine is that sometimes stuff happens at too fast a pace for me. If something happens on Tuesday, by the time Sunday rolls around and it’s time for me to do my weekly post, it’s often old news, too old to bother with. That’s why it’s a good thing that I have my not-so-super-secret other blog, where I can keep up with such events. On the other hand, the advantage of a once-a-week posting schedule is that there are times I can look back at a story that evolved over the last week and, instead of blogging about it in daily chunks, I can put together a post that tells the whole story and puts it in context. Something like that happened last week. The beauty of it is that I played a major role in bringing the story to public consciousness, followed the story as it evolved, and now can provide a fairly complete recounting. Or so I hope.

First, however, let’s take advantage of another good thing about waiting to blog about a story, namely getting to see the reactions of quacks to what happened. No one can do it better than everybody’s favorite all around quack, crank, and all-purpose conspiracy theorist Mike Adams, who greeted me yesterday morning with this headline: VAXXED film pulled from Robert De Niro’s Tribeca Film Festival following totalitarian censorship demands from pharma-linked vaccine pushers and media science trolls. What on earth is Adams talking about, you might wonder? In case you haven’t been following the news, here’s a link to the New York Times story on the same incident: “Robert De Niro Pulls Anti-Vaccine Documentary From Tribeca Film Festival.” Basically, the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival selected an antivaccine documentary directed by Andrew Wakefield for screening and then thought better of it after a major uproar and a whole boatload of bad press.

I’ll deal with Adams’ post a bit later because it’s so hilariously nutty but also because it is basically the propaganda line that antivaccinationists are putting on this PR debacle brought about by Andrew Wakefield and Robert De Niro. (I never thought I’d use those two names in the same sentence.) Let’s go back a week and see what I mean. (more…)

Posted in: Book & movie reviews, Science and the Media, Vaccines

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Audio Therapy for Postoperative Pediatric Pain: Randomized Controlled Nonsense

For 10/10 pain I recommend two Rihannas and a Captain and Tennille!

For 10/10 pain, I recommend two Rihannas and a Captain and Tennille

In January of 2015, a study on “the effect of audio therapy to treat postoperative pain in children” performed at Lurie Children’s Hospital and published in Pediatric Surgery International made the media rounds. It was the typical story where numerous news outlets further exaggerated already exaggerated claims made in a university press release, in this case Northwestern University in Chicago. Some of the reporting was quite silly.

The study authors, the chair of pediatric anesthesiology at the hospital and his daughter, a biomedical engineering student at Northwestern who is now a fourth year medical student at Johns Hopkins, make some reasonable points in the introduction. Fear of opioid-related side effects, in particular respiratory suppression, does often result in poorly managed postoperative pain in kids. And there isn’t great data on the safety and efficacy of non-opioid medications for this purpose. (more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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More drugs, more supplements, and potentially more problems

drugs and supplements

Early in my career I was fortunate to be offered a role as a hospital pharmacist, working on an inpatient ward along with physicians, nurses, and a number of other health professionals. My responsibilities included conducting a detailed medication review with each newly admitted patient. We would sit together, often with family members, going through what was sometimes a literal garbage bag full of medications, and documenting the drug, the dose, and the reason for use. I can’t remember the most medications I ever counted, but a dozen or more was normal. Some were taking medications four or five times per day, every day. Were all these drugs necessary? In many cases, no. They’d been started at different times, often by different physicians. Some drugs treated the side effects of other medications. Few had ever had a health professional document them all in a single list. There had rarely been an overall review for safety and appropriateness. Few patients knew the treatment goals of their medications. Often, they’d never been asked about their treatment preferences.

In addition to auditing every prescribed medication, I asked about vitamins, supplements and over-the-counter drugs. I usually encountered the same scenario – multiple products, often without any clear medical need. There were vitamins for “eyes”, tonics for “the blood”, and supplements believed to treat or prevent illness. There was regular (and sometimes dangerous) over-the-counter painkiller consumption. Sometimes all of these combinations were clearly antagonistic: concurrent laxatives and treatments for diarrhea, or sleeping pills taken along with stimulants. Worryingly, few had disclosed the use of many of these products to their physician beforehand.

Medication reviews were a tremendous amount of work – but enormously rewarding. It was not difficult to find one or more cases of drugs potentially causing harm, or situations with clear drug-drug or drug-supplement interaction. In some cases, it was the medications that had put them in the hospital in the first place. Working with the residents and medical staff we could usually find ways to simplify their regimen, often discontinuing one or more drugs, reducing the doses of others, and suggesting ways to cut their supplement and over-the-counter drug use – or at a minimum, reduce the risk that these products could cause problems. Not only did patients end up with simpler medication schedules, we were helping them feel better, too. Before every patient was discharged, they’d get a follow-up visit from me. I’d provide a detailed list of current medications with a simplified schedule designed to make medication use easier. We’d provide copies for them to take to the pharmacy and to any specialist. In many cases, patients were still on a long list of drugs. But we’d cleaved away the most harmful and unnecessary, trying to leave only the medications that were appropriate. (more…)

Posted in: Herbs & Supplements, Pharmaceuticals, Science and Medicine

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