Posts Tagged Dr. Joe

Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules: A Chemist Separates Fact from Fiction


“Dr. Joe” (from the title of his radio show) has done it again. He keeps putting out books faster than I can take them in; this one is titled Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules. It is packed with pithy analyses of health-related subjects that should be of particular interest to SBM readers.

Dr. Joe is Joseph Schwarcz, a chemistry professor and science popularizer based at McGill University. I’ve reviewed two of his many previous books before, Is that a Fact? here on SBM and The Right Chemistry over at, as well as his free online chemistry lectures, “Food for Thought“, over at As usual, this new book is a compendium of short (four-page) articles on a variety of subjects, written in a humorous, accessible style, and larded with intriguing trivia like where to see the largest illuminated advertising sign in the world.

If you read this book, you will:

  • Learn that Mozart only had seven teeth when he died.
  • Learn what was the first synthetic drug ever given to a human, and who administered it.
  • Learn that Popeye really ate spinach for the vitamin A, not for the iron, and how myths about myths about spinach (no, that’s not a typo) led to ever-increasing misinformation.
  • Hear the story of American military experts in WWII who had the bright idea of turning bats into weapons by attaching small incendiary devices to them. In an experiment hilariously gone wrong, the flaming bats set fire to a general’s car. (Remember that saying about military intelligence?)
  • Learn the role of coprolites (fossilized animal poop) in the development of modern agriculture.
  • Learn why Greek yogurt is not friendly to the environment.

Dr. Joe is a packrat for tidbits like these. I wonder where he finds them all. He seems to have a bottomless supply. (more…)

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Dr. Joe Writes About Quackery

Not long ago I wrote about the free online “Food for Thought” course. Joe Schwarcz (“Dr. Joe”) was one of the three professors teaching that course. He also has a radio show, a blog, a podcast, and he writes books. His newest book will be of particular interest to SBM readers: Is That a Fact? Frauds, Quacks, and the Real Science of Everyday Life.


I reviewed an earlier book of his, The Right Chemistry, for Skeptic magazine. You can read my review online here. I called him “The Carl Sagan of Chemistry” for his ability to popularize science and make it not only palatable but fascinating and entertaining. In the new book, Dr. Joe turns his attention to exactly the kind of subjects we cover on this blog. He is a chemist and most of us are physicians, but we reach the same conclusions because we look at the evidence from the same rigorous scientific viewpoint.

In The Right Chemistry, Dr. Joe explains that “chemical” does not mean “bad stuff” — chemicals make up the entire world, and we are made of chemicals that our own body manufactures. He shares his encyclopedic store of obscure and intriguing scientific facts. Have you ever heard of kangatarians? Did you know asparagus can grow up to 10 inches a day? Can you explain why crystals of Epsom salts crumble if you yell at them? Do you think explosives can’t be made on a plane with small amounts of liquids? (Dr. Joe thinks they can, but for obvious reasons he’s not divulging the recipe.) You probably didn’t know that in World War II the U.S. military developed a mixture called “Who Me?” that smelled like feces and was dispensed with an atomizer. French Resistance fighters were supposed to surreptitiously spray it on German officers to embarrass them, but it wasn’t a great success since the sprayer ended up as stinky as the sprayee.

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