Posts Tagged drug costs

R&D and the High Cost of Drugs

Would I lie to you?

Would I lie to you?

Until a year ago very few people had ever heard of Martin Shkreli. In 2015 the then-32-year-old CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC became the poster boy for Big Pharma eXXXcesses when Turing acquired rights to Daraprim, an antiparasitic drug used widely to treat toxoplasmosis. The acquisition itself wasn’t particularly controversial. Raising the price of Daraprim from $13.50 per pill to $750 per pill was.

And so another round of hand-wringing and teeth-gnashing over health care costs began. There was a Congressional hearing where Shkreli preened and smirked and refused to answer questions, later asserting that he had been subpoenaed “unethically” and that it is, “hard to accept that these imbeciles represent the people in our government.” Benjamin Brafman, Shkreli’s attorney, clarified afterward that, “he meant no disrespect…” He wouldn’t want to leave the wrong impression. (more…)

Posted in: Ethics, Pharmaceuticals, Science and Medicine

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Recombinant Human Antithrombin – Milking Nanny Goats for Big Bucks

Antithrombin deficiency is a hereditary disease causing low levels or defects of antithrombin, a blood protein required for controlling clot formation. Patients are at risk of blood clots, organ damage, and death. They usually have to take oral anticoagulant drugs like warfarin for life.

During high-risk procedures like surgery or childbirth, oral anticoagulants must be discontinued to minimize the chance of bleeding complications. While patients are off oral anticoagulants, they are given preventive treatment with antithrombin derived from pooled human blood. With any human blood product there is a small risk of infection with diseases like hepatitis C. And human antithrombin supplies are not plentiful.

Clever researchers found an ingenious solution. Put a human antithrombin gene in goats, milk them, isolate the human antithrombin protein from the milk, and voila! An udderly safe and plentiful source. A Brit might call it bleatin’ brilliant. (more…)

Posted in: Pharmaceuticals, Science and Medicine

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