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Posts Tagged Fibromyalgia

How not to report about vaccine safety issues, Toronto Star edition

This is the original headline of the Toronto Star's scientifically incompetent and fear mongering Gardasil story. It was later changed to "Families seek more transparency on HPV vaccine."

This is the original headline of the Toronto Star‘s scientifically incompetent and fear mongering Gardasil story. It was later changed to “Families seek more transparency on HPV vaccine.”

I remember it well, because several of my readers forwarded it to me not long after it appeared on the website of the Toronto Star: An eye-catching headline proclaiming a “wonder drug’s dark side,” that “wonder drug” being Gardasil, one of two vaccines against the human papilloma virus (HPV) designed to prevent cervical cancer by preventing infection with the HPV virus. The story’s caption blared:

Hundreds of thousands of teen girls in Canada have safely taken Gardasil, a vaccine shown to prevent HPV. But a Star investigation has found that since 2008 at least 60 Canadians have experienced debilitating illnesses after inoculation. Patients and parents say the incidents point to the importance of full disclosure of risks.

There was even a video that would have been right at home on a variety of antivaccine websites, such as Age of Autism, SafeMinds, or VaxTruth:

Indeed, the video above reminded me more than anything else, of a segment from the antivaccine “documentary” that functions as antivaccine propaganda, The Greater Good, which portrays as one of its vaccine “victims” Gabi Swank, a girl whose story is not unlike that of Kaitlyn Armstrong, the teen profiled by the Star. Both girls had a deterioration of their health that appears to have happened sometime after receiving Gardasil. Both attribute their health issues to Gardasil. Neither story was examined with even a modicum of skepticism or critical thinking. In fact, part of the reason I recognized immediately how bad the Star story was derives from my previous experience examining similar stories promoted by the particularly vociferous wing of the antivaccine movement that focuses on the perceived “evils” of Gardasil. That’s something we expect from an antivaccine propaganda film like The Greater Good. We expect better from investigative journalists like David Bruser and Jesse McLean. We don’t get it.

I had meant to blog about this incident because the Star story was such a horrendously bad story from a scientific perspective, but, blogging being what it is, other topics intruded and for some reason I never got back to this topic. Over the last 11 days, however, the criticism and inept responses kept percolating along, as you will see, involving a clueless editor who lashed out at critics, a public editor who just didn’t “get it,” and a newspaper that took far too long to admit that it had screwed up epically and only then after sliming its critics. Fortunately, an excellent analysis in the Los Angeles Times by Michael Hiltzik provided me with an “in” to do the post I had wanted to do before. How the Toronto Star wrote the story is an object lesson in how not to do a vaccine safety story, and how it responded to reasonable criticism was an even more pointed lesson in how not to deal with scientific critics.

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Posted in: Science and the Media, Vaccines

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Tai chi and fibromyalgia in the New England Journal of Medicine: An “alternative” frame succeeds

It never seems to fail. I go away for a few days, in this case to combine fun with pleasure and pleasure with fun by giving a talk to the Chicago Skeptics and at the same time meeting my brand new (well, by this time three weeks old) nephew for the first time, and something always happens. Before I get to what happened, I just want to point out that the talk actually went pretty darned well. I was utterly shocked that it was pretty much standing room only, with perhaps 50 people there to hear me. Honestly, don’t you people have anything better to do on a beautiful Saturday afternoon in August? But, seriously, the whole thing was a blast, and the assembled skeptics there didn’t even let me off the hook, as at least a couple of them asked some fairly challenging questions, one of which, I must admit, I wasn’t prepared for. In any case, my thanks go out to Dr. Jennifer Newport, skeptical Chicago pediatrician extraordinaire and organizer of my talk and the party at her apartment afterward. Between the two events she raised hundreds of dollars for the vaccination drive going on at DragonCon this weekend, Chicago Skeptics, the Women Thinking Free Foundation, and CFI-Chicago for inviting me and being such fantastic hosts.

Back to business. Science-based medicine (SBM) business, that is.

What happened while I was away could almost be characterized by the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) singing “Oops, I did it again.” Three weeks ago, the hallowed pages of the NEJM hosted a truly execrably credulous review article about acupuncture. So bad was the article that it “merited” the incredibly rare triple beat-down from this very blog, with posts by Steve Novella, the ever-irascible Mark Crislip, and myself in rapid succession applying the clue-by-four. As I was preparing to leave for Chicago on Thursday, I happened to look at the very latest issue of the NEJM hot off the presses, and what to my wondering (and watering–it is ragweed season) eyes should appear but an article reporting a study on the use of tai chi in treating fibromyalgia. Entitled A Randomized Trial of Tai Chi for Fibromyalgia, the study comes out of the Tufts University School of Medicine and the Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Boston and was carried out by a team led by Chenchen Wang, MD, MPH. Not surprisingly, the study has gotten a lot of play in the media, for example, in this story in the L.A. Times, which is at least reasonably restrained, probably because it an AP wire story by Marilynn Marchione, who has written some excellent articles about “alternative” medicine before. Even the usually reliable GoozNews seems smitten with this study beyond what it rates, characterizing it as “rare victory for the National Institute of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA), who routinely comes under fire for pushing funding for these types of studies.”

I’m less impressed. You’ll see what I mean in a few minutes, I hope. First, however, let’s look at the study itself.
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Posted in: Clinical Trials, Medical Academia, Science and the Media

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