Posts Tagged geriatrics

Do pill organizers help or hurt?

"Blister packs" help people take their medication on the correct schedule.

“Blister packs” help people take their medication on the correct schedule.

In order for medication to work, getting a prescription filled isn’t enough. You have to actually take the medication. And that’s where you (the patient) come in. Estimates vary based on the population and the medication, but a reasonable assumption is that 50% of people given a prescription don’t take their medication as prescribed. In pharmacy terminology we usually call this medication compliance, but because that sounds a bit paternalistic, the term medication adherence is also used. People forget doses, deliberately skip doses, and sometimes even take more than directed. Often, the prescription isn’t finished completely. Perhaps not surprisingly, people are less likely to adhere to their prescribed medication schedule when the condition they are treating has no symptoms. All things being equal, you’re more likely to take your pain control medicine than your hypertensive medications: Pain medications have side effects, but should help you feel better right now. Hypertension medications can only make you feel worse. Statins (as a group of medications) are another good example. We treat high cholesterol to lower the risk of heart disease: heart attacks, strokes, and death. It has no obvious benefit now, nor will we ever be able to point to the benefit we received. We’re taking the medication to reduce the risk of something happening in the future. If the drug isn’t taken regularly (or at all) then you’re not going to get the expected benefits of statin therapy. The “value” that treatment delivers is reduced (or eliminated). And if you stop a medication periodically, then restart it, you might get more side effects than you would have if you just took it regularly. (more…)

Posted in: Medical devices, Pharmaceuticals, Quality Improvement, Science and Medicine

Leave a Comment (0) →

How do we avoid harming the elderly with prescription drugs?

Is the best medicine no medicine at all? Sometimes. My past posts have emphasized that the appropriateness of any drug depends on an evaluation of benefits and risks. There are no completely safe interventions, and no drug is free of any side effects. Our choice is ideally informed by high-quality data like randomized controlled trials, with lots of real-world experience so we understand a drug’s true toxicity. But when it comes down to a single patient, treatment decisions are personalized: we must consider individual patient characteristics to understand the expected benefits and potential harms. And in a world with perfect prescribing and drug use, harms wouldn’t be eliminated, but they would be minimized. Unfortunately, we’re not there yet. There is ample evidence to show that the way in which prescription drugs are currently used causes avoidable harms to patients.

The art and science of medicine is a series of interventions to improve health. In making these treatment decisions, we strive to minimize iatrogenic harm — that is, harms caused by the intervention itself. High up on the list of of avoidable harms are adverse events related to drug treatments. Audits of adverse events are astonishing and shameful. Studies suggest 28% of events are avoidable in the community setting, and 42% are avoidable in long-term care settings.  That’s a tremendous amount of possible harm resulting from treatments that were prescribed to help. And the group that is harmed the most? The elderly. (more…)

Posted in: Pharmaceuticals

Leave a Comment (22) →