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Taxpayers Fund Scientology Research on Gulf War Veterans

Church_of_Scientology, Fountain Avenue, Los Angeles

The “Hubbard protocol” is Scientology’s religion-based, pseudoscientific “detoxification” treatment used in its Narconon program to treat drug addiction. It was dreamed up by a science fiction writer with no medical training. Now it is being studied as a treatment for veterans suffering from Gulf War illness. Our limited public money for research is being wasted on a study with no scientific merit. Whether or not you consider this a church/state conflict, the study is clearly ill-advised.

The study: $600K worth of sweat

A description of the study is available online in the government’s clinical trials registry. The DOD funded this study to the tune of $633,677. The subjects are veterans with Gulf War illness characterized by persistent memory and concentration problems, headaches, fatigue, and muscle and joint pain. The illness has not been well defined, and its cause has not been determined; but the researchers are working on the assumption that toxins are the cause and that the treatment will relieve symptoms by removing toxins from the body.

The control group will get only “usual care.” The experimental group will get:

A four to six week regimen consisting of daily, supervised, mild-moderate exercise as tolerated for 20 minutes, supervised, intermittent Finnish saunas (at about 140’F) sauna time with breaks and showers, gradually increased as tolerated to approximately 4 hours, dietary supplements including immediate release niacin in gradually increasing doses from 100 mg to a maximum of 5000 mg per day, salt and water, other vitamins, minerals and oils per Hubbard protocol.

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Posted in: Clinical Trials, Religion

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Gulf War Illness

One-fourth of the veterans of the 1990-91 Gulf War complain of persistent memory and concentration problems, chronic headaches, widespread pain, gastrointestinal problems, and other chronic abnormalities not explained by well-established diagnoses. Treatments are ineffective and symptoms do not improve over time. Gulf War Syndrome or Gulf War Illness is a controversial diagnosis, and some have questioned whether it really exists. Now a new report from the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses has concluded that Gulf War Illness is real and that it is probably attributable to pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and pesticide exposures.

Its major conclusions:

  • Gulf War illness is a serious condition that affects at least one fourth of the 697,000 U.S. veterans who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War.
  • Gulf War illness fundamentally differs from trauma and stress-related syndromes described after other wars.
  • Evidence strongly and consistently indicates that two Gulf War neurotoxic exposures are causally associated with Gulf War illness: 1) use of pyridostigmine bromide (PB) pills, given to protect troops from effects of nerve agents, and 2) pesticide use during deployment.

The Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses was mandated by Congress and appointed in 2002. The report, published November 17, 2008, is an exhaustive review of all available data, including some that is unpublished. It runs to 454 pages, has multiple authors and consultants, lists 1840 references and has multiple appendices. I can’t pretend to have mastered all the information, but I have read enough to understand the basis of their conclusions. They are based on good evidence and logic, but they leave me with some doubts.
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Posted in: Politics and Regulation

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