Posts Tagged Intercessory Prayer

Cochrane is Starting to ‘Get’ SBM!

This essay is the latest in the series indexed at the bottom.* It follows several (nos. 10-14) that responded to a critique by statistician Stephen Simon, who had taken issue with our asserting an important distinction between Science-Based Medicine (SBM) and Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM). (Dr. Gorski also posted a response to Dr. Simon’s critique). A quick-if-incomplete Review can be found here.

One of Dr. Simon’s points was this:

I am as harshly critical of the hierarchy of evidence as anyone. I see this as something that will self-correct over time, and I see people within EBM working both formally and informally to replace the rigid hierarchy with something that places each research study in context. I’m staying with EBM because I believe that people who practice EBM thoughtfully do consider mechanisms carefully. That includes the Cochrane Collaboration.

To which I responded:

We don’t see much evidence that people at the highest levels of EBM, eg, Sackett’s Center for EBM or Cochrane, are “working both formally and informally to replace the rigid hierarchy with something that places each research study in context.”


Well, perhaps I shouldn’t have been so quick to quip—or perhaps that was exactly what the doctor ordered, as will become clear—because on March 5th, nearly four months after writing those words, I received this email from Karianne Hammerstrøm, the Trials Search Coordinator and Managing Editor for The Campbell Collaboration, which lists Cochrane as one of its partners and which, together with the Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, is a source of systematic reviews:


Posted in: Clinical Trials, Energy Medicine, Medical Academia, Science and Medicine

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Prior Probability: the Dirty Little Secret of “Evidence-Based Alternative Medicine”—Continued

This is an addendum to my previous entry on Bayesian statistics for clinical research.† After that posting, a few comments made it clear that I needed to add some words about estimating prior probabilities of therapeutic hypotheses. This is a huge topic that I will discuss briefly. In that, happily, I am abetted by my own ignorance. Thus I apologize in advance for simplistic or incomplete explanations. Also, when I mention misconceptions about either Bayesian or “frequentist” statistics, I am not doing so with particular readers in mind, even if certain comments may have triggered my thinking. I am quite willing to give readers credit for more insight into these issues than might be apparent from my own comments, which reflect common, initial difficulties in digesting the differences between the two inferential approaches. Those include my own difficulties, after years of assuming that the “frequentist” approach was both comprehensive and rational—while I had only a cursory understanding of it. That, I imagine, placed me well within two standard deviations of the mean level of statistical knowledge held by physicians in general.


Posted in: Clinical Trials, Medical Academia, Science and Medicine

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