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Posts Tagged Tourette Syndrome

Use of Dental Appliances in the Management of Tourette Syndrome

Editor’s note: This Science Based Medicine blog post is another collaborative effort between Grant Ritchey and Clay Jones. Not only have they previously co-authored an SBM post on fluoride, their partnership has recently expanded into other areas of science journalism. Since the departure of Dr. Jason Luchtefeld as co-host of The Prism Podcast, Clay has joined Grant as the new co-host. To this end, Clay and Grant have added a Science Based Medicine segment to each podcast episode, in which recent SBM blog posts are reviewed and discussed with the authors themselves. Check them out on iTunes or your favorite podcatcher.

"We'll remove that headgear when your tics improve."

“We’ll remove that headgear when your tics improve.”

One of our primary goals is to promote the concept of scientific skepticism and the importance of prior plausibility when interpreting new research. On the pages of this website, and in extracurricular activities like our various podcasts and personal blogs, we often call upon these two load-bearing pillars of science-based medicine when investigating implausible and unproven claims championed by well-meaning true believers and outright charlatans. What our collective experience has revealed time and time again is that both will often hope that a gullible public will put their trust in a warped version of science, while relying on emotional responses to anecdotes and testimonials.

In our post today, we will walk readers through our investigation of thus far unproven claims involving the treatment of a complex neurological disorder, Tourette syndrome (TS), with a fitted dental appliance aimed at improving the alignment of a patient’s jaw. From the perspective of a dentist (Grant) and a pediatrician (Clay), there aren’t any obvious connections between the jaw and this childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder, but proponents believe that there is one and that these appliances can significantly reduce the severity of symptoms. Although impossible to enter into an investigation such as this completely free of emotion or bias, we truly attempted to keep an open mind throughout the process.

First up, a disclaimer:

Clay was diagnosed with Tourette syndrome when he was 7 years old. As both a pediatrician who has now cared for a number of patients with TS and someone who has personally experienced many of the negative physical and social sequelae associated with the condition, this is a topic that Clay takes rather personally. Although his symptoms are now on the milder end of the severity spectrum, and are far from debilitating, they do often serve as a source of frustration in his day-to-day life. The thought of children with Tourette syndrome being taken advantage makes him angrier than that time somebody switched out his regular coffee for Colombian decaffeinated crystals.

Without hesitation, we would love for there to be another effective treatment option for Tourette syndrome in our armamentarium, especially one that would be essentially risk free and relatively inexpensive. Again, as scientific skeptics we are open to new evidence as it emerges. But before we get to the claim and the research being used to back it up, we will give a primer on the scientific consensus on TS so that readers can better assess for themselves the prior plausibility of this proposed treatment.
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Posted in: Critical Thinking, Dentistry, Medical devices

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Chiropractic “Research” on Tourette Syndrome: The Trouble with Case Reports…..

I can think of few conditions with clinical features more ideal for establishing a pattern of abuse at the hands of practitioners of so-called alternative medicine than Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome (TS), which first manifests itself in early childhood in the overwhelming majority of patients, is a neurological disorder with infamous motor and vocal manifestations and a troubled past. Historically the condition was blamed on everything from emotional disturbances to outright faking to demon possession. But over the past few decades it has increasingly been recognized as a primarily organic disorder caused by negative genetic and environmental influences on areas in the brain which control movement and behavior.

I have a particular interest in Tourette syndrome, not just because I am a pediatrician but because I was diagnosed with the disorder at the age of seven. I have been lucky in that my symptoms, after a few rocky years in middle school and early high school, have been fairly mild. It is obvious to most people that I have a movement disorder, but it has never impacted my ability to function in society and succeed in my chosen profession of pediatric medicine. In fact, I often think of my Tourette’s as a positive aspect of my life, believing that it helped shape who I am as a person. I feel that it has helped instill in me positive personality attributes that are beneficial in the practice of medicine, such as empathy and compassion.

Patients that would have been institutionalized a hundred years ago, or worse as you go farther back in time, are now treated based on scientific advances in neuroscience and pharmacology, typically very successfully — that is if they manage to avoid involvement with quacks and charlatans. A 2009 survey of TS patients, or parents of patients with TS, revealed that nearly two thirds partake in alternative therapies with no proven benefit.

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Posted in: Chiropractic, Neuroscience/Mental Health

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