Posts Tagged Veterinary medicine

An Appraisal of Courses in Veterinary Chiropractic

Today’s guest article, by By Ragnvi E. Kjellin, DVM, and Olle Kjellin, MD, PhD, was submitted to a series of veterinary journals, but none of them wanted to publish it. is pleased to do so.


Animal chiropractic is a relatively new phenomenon that many veterinarians may know too little about. In Sweden, chiropractic was licensed for humans in 1989, but not for animals. Chiropractors claim that their field is scientific, while others consider it to be a form of ”alternative medicine” with an implausible and unsubstantiated theoretical foundation and little evidence of efficacy. Chiropractic is not taught in medical or veterinary schools.

Courses in “veterinary chiropractic” are offered by two companies in Germany. In their classes, veterinarians and human chiropractors are purposely mixed. A recent malpractice case in Sweden involved one of their students, a veterinarian who was accused of injuring a horse with chiropractic neck manipulation. That case led us to inquire into the underlying theory, clinical practices, and training of “veterinary chiropractors”.

Human chiropractic was founded in 1895 when D.D. Palmer, a grocer and magnetic healer with no medical training, decided that 95% of all diseases were due to vertebral subluxations that blocked the flow through the spinal nerves to all muscles and organs of the body, including the brain, eyes and ears. Adjusting subluxations supposedly allows the body to heal itself by “innate intelligence.” Over a century later, there is still no evidence that such subluxations or “intelligence” exists.

Mainstream medicine has always been skeptical of chiropractic1. Even some chiropractors have criticized the practices of their colleagues2,3. Several recent meta-analyses of chiropractic for various ailments4,5,6 have concluded that musculoskeletal back and possibly neck pain may benefit from spinal manipulation therapy; but the results are not superior to other treatments, and there is no evidence of benefit for other ailments.

Considerable controversy surrounds the chiropractic field. It is therefore essential that veterinarians understand the facts about chiropractic before they consider practicing it, recommending it, or even condoning it for the animals they treat. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Veterinary medicine

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Another new blogger, or SBM is going to the dogs (well, horses, actually)

We at Science-Based Medicine are pleased to announce the recruitment of yet another blogger to add to the discussion of the scientific basis of medicine. We’re especially pleased because he will help us address questions that we were not particularly well-equipped to address before his joining us. So, please welcome to the SBM fold David Ramey, DVM, who will be discussing science- and evidence-based veterinary medicine.

David Ramey, DVM, is a 1983 graduate of Colorado State University. After completing an internship in equine medicine and surgery at Iowa State University, he entered private equine practice in southern California. Dr. Ramey is an author of numerous books on equine health care, and a prominent voice for the application of evidence-based standards to veterinary medicine. He was a member of the task for on “Therapeutic Options” of the American Association of Equine Practitioners, as well as a member of the task force that wrote the current guidelines for the use of “Complementary and Alternative” veterinary medicine for the American Veterinary Association. He has published numerous articles and books pertaining to “alternative” approaches to veterinary medicine, including the 2004 Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine Considered, co-authored with world renowned veterinary ethicist Dr. Bernard Rollin.

We get a fair number of questions about the use of “alternative” medical practices such as homeopathy and acupuncture on animals, particularly from people who ask us how they can appear to work on animals when animals supposedly don’t exhibit placebo effects. Dr. Ramey will be of great value in discussing such issues. Unfortunately, he will only be able to contribute posts around once a month or so. Fortunately, his first post will appear tomorrow. Don’t miss it.

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