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Archive for April, 2008

Charlie Woo TV

Some of us received the announcement a week ago of the Bravewell Collaborative’s planned conference on “Integrative Medicine” co-sponsored with the National Academies’ Institute of Medicine, to take place in February, 2009.  (Note: I like to cap slogans and commercial trademarks and such and enclose them in quotation marks. Especially when the terms have no consensus meaning or are intended to obscure and confuse. ) 

Several of us may blog on the announcement. I want to emphasize a few points that struck me as revealing.  

The announcement also listed Friday’s Charlie Rose Pub TV interview program with Harvey Fineberg, MD, President of the “IOM,” Christy Mack, wife of the CEO of Morgan Stanley and the ideologue behind Bravewell and the project, and Ralph Snyderman, ubiquitous former dean of Duke University Medical School now vagabond “CAM” promoter and fund raiser. 

First off was a significant disclosure. Charlie Rose had been married at one time to Christy Mack’s sister, and Christy and he were still dear friends. As if disclosure is enough to help a viewer distinguish between facts and views obscured by a haze of politeness, appreciation, and gooey mutual stroking.

So much for  investigative, penetrating, and revealing journalism.

Snyderman, whose school was recipient also of large Templeton Foundation grants to ivestigate significance of spirituality and religion in “healing” revealed that he at one time was one of those straight arrow physicians who treated disease (instead of a person.) Until he experienced some of “the techniques” – unspecified – himself. In typical testimonial phrasing, he found it wondrous that something as intangible as hope could help heal. (Some of us also find that wondrous – even dubiousl.)  And then the tried and trite criticisms of docs being too involved in details (like what works and how to use it) and losing sight of the “whole person.”  ”Health is a value and one can have impact…” Eyes roll at such platitudinous and vacuous language.

If that were not enough, Fineberg demonstrated his deep knowledge of “Integrative Medicine” by telling the difference between “healing” and “curing,” and his democratic outlook by wanting to test any methods that works – regardless of the origin. David G’s blog the other day and Kim Atwood’s previous words discussed that issue, which still befuddles the NCCAM, which seems to test anything whether it contains molecules or not, and whether the idea generated in a crucible of observation and experimentation, or descended in a 2 AM drug-induced revelation.  He then used artemisinin (for resistant malaria) to illustrate the potential mining of miraculous natural drugs from traditional Chinese Medicine. I assume he assumed that TCM practitioners had  had been using it for malaria for centuries…despite the fact that there was no description of infectious diseases in TCM. Finding artemisinin for malaria was a product of extraction and purification from plants, known as modern pharmacology.

Christy Mack tried to introduce new concepts, explaining that one of her new aims is to empower the patient to heal oneself…That is not only decades old, but a word-linkage that, as with all esoteric ideation , means a lot to her and her co-believers, but little to the uninitiated.  Another concept was for each person to make a personal health plan for one’s life.  Can’t I do that now if I want? Seems I already did, then chance and nature intervened…

When Snyderman let slip the term, “CAM”, Mack jumped in saying, “Integrative Medicine” is not “CAM”.  Here was a clue to the joining of these otherwise poorly fitting edges of “IM” and the “IOM.”   We just won’t talk about those inconvenient absurdities that “IOM” might shrink from. My take is that Mack and ”CAM” advocacates want the blessings of as many System organizations as possible to fill their “CAM” CV as prelude to legitimization, licensing, and insurance reimbursement.  “CAM” practitioners are using the Bravewell as internediary to using “IOM.” Morgan Stanley money being an efficient lubricant. Simple.

So “IOM,” in exchange for more $?millions as it did for the NCCAM committee, sells itself and its merit badge for ”CAM”‘s  CV sash.  Fair exchange in this capitalist system, yes?  Seems that the only factor nissing in this exchange that keeps it from illegality is a sexual act. The Quiet Revolution moves on. 

Personal note: In 1993 when I awoke from 3 weeks of post-op unconsciousness in the ICU, the first things I recalled were on the overhead TV: the NCAA basketball finals, the Waco cult building complex on fire, and Charlie Rose interviewing another talking head with that ominous blacked-out background. The Quiet Revolution moves on as the Nightmare recurs. �

Posted in: Faith Healing & Spirituality, General, Health Fraud, Medical Academia, Science and Medicine, Science and the Media

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Cell Phones and Brain Tumors

The question of whether or not there is a link between the use of mobile phones (also called cell phones) and the risk of brain tumors has been cropping up more and more frequently in the media – every time a new study or analysis comes out. This is a very important question of public health as cell phone use is becoming more common, and brain tumors are a very serious and often life-threatening category of diseases.

Of course such questions are best answered by a dispassionate, careful, and systematic look at the science – what is the plausibility of a link and what is the evidence that there actually is one. At this point we are somewhere in the middle of studying this problem. We already have substantial data, but it is conflicting and the research community is still debating on how to get more definitive data everyone can agree upon. So at present there is a variety of opinions on the matter. The consensus seems to be that cell phones probably do not cause brain tumors, but we’re not sure, there is meaningful dissent from this opinion, and so more study is needed.

There are two types of scientific studies we can do to answer this question. The first is biological and looks at the effects of radiation, and specifically the type and strength of radiation emitted by cell phones, on cells in a test tube and on animals. This will tell us if a risk from cell phones is plausible, if there is a mechanism, and what, if any, the effects are likely to be. But this kind of data will not tell us if cell phones in fact have caused or are causing brain tumors.

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Posted in: Neuroscience/Mental Health, Public Health

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Hormone Replacement Therapy

For years postmenopausal women were told that estrogen was safe. Now they’re being told that estrogen is dangerous. Women are confused. The media haven’t helped; they’ve only increased the confusion and created some myths. Alternative medicine offers the option of herbal remedies they say are safer than estrogen. Suzanne Somers says all of us (even men!) should be taking bioidentical hormones and adjusting our own doses according to how we feel. What’s a woman to do? What does the science really say?

Before the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) of 2002, there were two main reasons for prescribing hormone replacement therapy (HRT): it relieved perimenopausal symptoms like hot flashes, and it helped prevent osteoporosis and fractures. There was good reason to believe that estrogen might also reduce the risk of heart attacks, but very few doctors (if any) ever prescribed it for the sole purpose of reducing heart risks. And doctors were always aware that estrogen and progestins were powerful drugs and were not risk-free.

There was a time in the mid-20th century when estrogen was thought to be a fountain of youth and women were encouraged to start taking it at menopause and continue for the rest of their lives. That attitude quickly changed as we realized these hormones were associated with blood clots, strokes, and increased rates of some cancers. We also learned that unopposed estrogen caused uterine cancer, and women who still had their uterus had to take progestins along with their estrogen. (more…)

Posted in: Pharmaceuticals

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