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Archive for October 16th, 2008

Getting It On with Homeopathy

I have more thoughts on the homeopathy matter than fit in follow-up notes, so here goes.

First, David Gorski recalls the 1994 Pediatrics report on childhood diarrhea treated with tailored homeopathic remedies for each patient. There is more to the story than has been written. I am certain much of this will get back to the authors, but others may benefit from knowing how this group of homeopaths operate.

I recall the paper well, because it was the first journal report that I deconstructed and published (Pediatrics, Oct 1995) as a regular article. I think it was the first time the journal had published a formal rebuttal outside the Letters section. The head of pediatric pharmacy at Valley Medical Center, San Jose, brought the paper to me and asked what I thought if it. Bill London of National Council against Health Fraud and I spent six months discussing it and working over the details.

The paper had so many flaws, that one letter could not contain them. It had five or six end points, several arithmetical errors, graphs with missing data, only one end point reached consensus signficance (barely.)

Each case received a remedy tailored to the age, condition, duration of symptoms, appearance and odor of the stool, the recall of the parent or relative about stool frequency (which depended on how often the child’s diapers were changed, and a number of other qualities, typical of a homeopathic approach to diagnosis. The remedies given were not based on etiology, but based on personal observations, We saw that the remedy was chosen at a snapshot in time, depending on all those factors which varied from hour to hour. So the remedies depended on the time at which the child was brought in for examination and were unchanged throughout the duration of illness. That made no sense at all. Besides, the specific remedies had no data behind them for proof of efficacy, and were chosen on basis of charts and computer references.

One could hardly find anything about the paper that would lend credibility to its conclusion that suggested homeopathy “worked“ better than placebo. The results in our opinion demonstrated nothing more than the variations in the clinical trial system (noise.)
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Posted in: Clinical Trials, Homeopathy, Science and Medicine

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Disintegrating Integrative Medicine: Lessons From Baking

Suppose I were to bake you a cake and my ingredient list included the following:

  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Butter
  • Sand
  • Flour
  • Baking Powder
  • Vanilla
  • Melamine
  • Sugar
  • Chocolate icing

What is the problem with the ingredient list? It has integrated inedible and poisonous items into the very fine basic ingredients that make a good cake. This is the exact same problem that the medical profession faces with the “integrative medicine” movement. Insofar as it espouses and promotes well-vetted, healthy ingredients, it is a boon to patients. But when inordinate emphasis is placed on placebos (“sand”) or when dangerous practices (“melamine”) are inserted into the prescription for our patients’ “health and wellness,” that attractive-appearing cake becomes a recipe for disaster.

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Posted in: Science and Medicine

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