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Recycle

Like most people who grew up after April 22, 1970, I think it is important to be as environmentally responsible as possible.  Like many I fail miserably much of the time, but at least I feel guilty about it.  Recycling offers the opportunity to feel good about my environmental impact with little effort, since the garbage collection infrastructure in Portland makes recycling easy.

Some products are best extensively reprocessed before reused. Urine, as an example. There are proponents of topical and/or drinking urine as a treatment/cure for nearly any illnesses.  The kidneys are mostly responsible for fluid and electrolyte balance and I realize that normal urine is mostly water, salts, urea and a smattering of other very dilute molecules. I have the urine tox screen to prove it.  Urine is not a particularly noxious body fluid, but it is not high on my list of liquids to drink under normal circumstances.

Urine is mostly water but not an optimal source of water if it is your only source for fluids.  Urine drinkers love to mention the occasional trapped earthquake victim who survives, in part, from drinking their own urine.  For the first several days the urine would be dilute enough to keep people reasonably hydrated, as humans cannot concentrate urine as well as, say, a camel.  So I can see where consuming urine for a short period of time would delay progressive dehydration and death. A couple days of drinking urine neat, shaken not stirred, would be harmless and, if there were no alternative sources of water, beneficial. I do suffer from the societal taboo that piss is icky, and for aesthetic reasons urine is not something I would want to consume, even when it is referred to as its more common designation ‘Coors Light’.The kidney, I should mention, is the only organ in the body that functions on magic.  Really.  Does anyone actually believe/understand the function of the so called Loop of Henle?  I scoff at those who talk about human energy fields or water having memory, but as best I can tell, the Loop of Henle is no different.  My undergrad degree was in physics, so at some point I suppose I ‘understood’ quantum mechanics and relativity, at least well enough for the tests. The Loop? Bah. Total smoke and mirrors.

Drinking your own piss has a long history, especially in India and Asia and advocates (mis)quote the bible:

Proverbs 5:15. Drink water from your own cistern, running water from your own well.

Although the following verses suggest that it is a metaphor for marital fidelity, not consuming pee.  The bible has never been a convincing source of medical advice, although with teenage boys at home, I increasingly see the wisdom of Deuteronomy 21:18-21, Exodus 21:17 and Proverbs 30:17.

The rationale behind drinking your urine is simple: it is an ultrafiltrate of all that is best in the blood, with none of the toxins, which are processed and disposed of by the liver.  So when you drink your urine, you are consuming a golden elixir of salts, proteins, and hormones, containing all you need to treat virtually every disease and maintain health.  Sort of an uber-energy drink with none of the caffeine and fewer calories.  Your own, early morning, midstream urine is to be preferred, and in a pinch you could drink others urine, preferably from the same sex.  I suppose it would be wise to avoid the urine of  the autistic, it being loaded with mercury, aluminum, and perhaps other toxic metals.

Are there uses for urine? Popular culture has it that peeing on a jellyfish sting will relieve the pain; this is neither supported or denied by the Pubmeds.  It appears to be the one therapy with no supporting Cochrane review.  Urine on a jellyfish sting, if dilute, is counterproductive, since fresh water will trigger jellyfish nematocysts to fire and increase the pain of the sting.

Similarly, topical urine is advised for bee, mosquito and other venomous bites, with neither supporting or disconfirming data.  Given the medical benefits of urea (mostly as a moisturizer at concentrations many fold higher than in the urine) and other molecules in urine, they may be products in piss that would inactivate venomous stings.  I can’t dismiss the concept out of hand, although concentrations in  the urine of well hydrated people would be minimal. So use the urine from a trapped earthquake victim or lifeboat survivor,  which will become concentrated with time, and not your Corona addled swimming or hiking partner.

It is an ongoing curiosity how proponents of curious therapies will take a bit of truth an magnify its significance out of all proportion to reality. An example.

Urokinase is a protein that has utility in dissolving clots.   Its dose, depending on what is treated, is around 500,000 to 2 million units IV.  Normal urine contains urokinase, but how much?  ” Normal human urine contained 2068 ± 0.36 u/ml of UK”    Hardly enough to have any effects should it be consumed orally, especially given the ability to the gi tract to reduce any protein to amino acids.  Yet because urokinase is useful in high doses iv in patients with clot, it is also useful orally as a medicine. Odd logic.

One site notes there are 2 grams of protein and a 100 mg of glucose excreted the urine a day.  Is that lot?  A dollar bill weighs a gram and we make 1 to 2 liters of urine a day.  So a cup of urine will contain about half a dollar bill in weight of protein (roughly the same as a McDonalds meat patty) and 25 milligrams of glucose,  about as much as the “one” on the back of a dollar. Compare that to 8,000 milligrams of protein and 12,000 milligrams of glucose in a cup of milk. Not quite homeopathic concentrations, but close.

The arguments behind the use of medicinal piss are the usual: appeals to antiquity (not mentioning the average life expectancy of the ancients was just a tich longer than a fruit flies), innumerable anecdotes, and the ever popular secrets “they” don’t want you to know.

The medical community has already been aware of [urine's] astounding efficacy for decades, and yet none of us has ever been told about it. Why? Maybe they think it’s too controversial. Or maybe, more accurately, there wasn’t any monetary reward for telling people what scientists know about one of the most extraordinary natural healing elements in the world.”

It is getting increasingly difficult to keep track of all the miracle cures I am supposed to keep secret.  One of these days I am going to slip up and inadvertently cure someone with an effective and inexpensive natural remedy. Even dogs and monkeys participate in the healing effects of drinking their own urine.  Or they have sloppy aim.  Of course monkeys and dogs eat their own vomit, so I doubt they have a discerning palate.

My Loop of Henle psychosis not withstanding, the understanding of renal physiology by urinologists is, well, interesting.  One site calls urine “purer than distilled water” and then lists all the beneficial chemicals in the urine. Given that the purpose of distilled water is to make the product nothing but H20, it is an interesting contradiction.

or

Urine is believed to be a byproduct of blood filtration. It is NOT excess water that is released by the body. When blood filled with nutrients pass through the liver, the toxins are filtered out and are excreted as solid waste. The purified blood then travels to the kidney where excess nutrients are eliminated from the body.

George Carlin used to talk about ‘jumbo shrimp’ and ‘military intelligence’; perhaps we should add ‘CAM understanding’ to the list.

The problem is getting the nerve to drink your piss since there is an aversion to consuming pee. As Rita Mae Brown said in a different context, “Nothing is unnatural – just untried.” If you work yourself up to it, all things are possible:

How many people do you know who have drunk enough urine to really know what it tastes like? Probably not too many. Those who regularly drink their own urine say it. But taking urine into your mouth might be too big a step to begin with. Rubbing a drop into the and first smelling your own urine can help you to overcome part of the barrier. Really, it often does not smell bad at all. Many people even like its sometimes sweet odor. More extensive massaging of urine into your skin is also a good way to become accustomed to your life water. How can you overcome feelings of aversion to drinking your own golden elixir? Start by drinking a drop then a sip each day and slowly build up to a fill glass of urine. This is the most comfortable way to allow your body, mind and soul to become accustomed to this therapy.

I’ll pass.

It would seem for those who participate in urine therapy there is a certain embarrassment in talking about their life changing cure for everything.  It is kind of sad, really, and I feel for them.  It must be difficult to have easy access to the cure for all diseases and have to feel uncomfortable about discussing it due to societal taboos.  And if we meet in public, really, I don’t want to know if you drink piss. That would be, under almost every circumstance, the OED definition of over-sharing.

Urine therapy is, of course, a panacea.

…one of the most powerful, most researched and most medically proven natural cures ever discovered. Multiple sclerosis, colitis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, hepatitis, hyperactivity, pancreatic insufficiency, psoriasis, eczema, diabetes, herpes, mononucleosis, adrenal failure, allergies and so many other ailments have been relieved through use of this therapy

Not a bad list.  Looking on the interwebs, there is no medical condition that is not amenable to treatment with either topical or oral urine, and they wisely advise against intravenous injection.

Any evidence for efficacy?  Nope.  Just testimonials.
Any reason to suspect drinking your piss would help any medical condition?  No.  Given the dilute nature of the products in urine, it should be neither helpful nor harmful.

Of course, the lack of efficacy or plausibility is no hindrance to use.  As one web site on the mechanism of urine therapy notes

…theories have never been proven using modern scientific procedures to verify his ideas, and at some levels has been completely dis-proven, but nevertheless people still believe them. Maybe the power of belief in this instance overcomes what factually may not be real.

Sums up the whole field of alt med, does it not?

Addendum

The links to sources in this entry may or may not refer back to original sources.  As is often the case in the more marginal CAM therapies, many sites appear nearly identical in content, one large cut and paste fest. Even Vanderbilt University regurgitates the same text as if were original without proper references; one would think a University would be sensitive to issues of plagiarism,  although perhaps Vanderbilt is the original source.

Posted in: Herbs & Supplements, Science and Medicine

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50 thoughts on “Recycle

  1. qetzal says:

    If the things in urine are so amazingly beneficial, why do our bodies work so hard to excrete them? And why don’t people with kidney failure live forever? Do any of the ‘urinologists’ have an answer for that?

  2. NYUDDS says:

    I loved the column! I’m reminded of a patient who needed nursing assistance to get from his wheelchair to my dental chair due to a recent leg amputation. He was 70 years old and over the years, we had a back-and-forth relationship of cajoling and needling. When I asked him how his “golden years” were progressing, he answered: “The only thing “golden” about these years is the color of my urine that I give the nurse every morning.”

  3. windriven says:

    Now wait, the renowned physician and researcher M. L. Ciccone revealed that peeing on one’s feet is a sure cure for athlete’s foot. And if her reputation alone is not enough to dispel your skepticism, she made this revelation in no less a venue than the David Letterman show*! Take that, Lamisil. Power to the people!

    *http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRSP5ZUmxP8 Her disclosure of the power of pee comes at about 16:20

  4. WilliamLawrenceUtridge says:

    Wow, that Vanderbilt University page is crammed full of ureferenced nonsense. It doesn’t seem to discuss homeopathy, but it does enthusiastically endorse acupuncture, including the meridians-and-qi aspects.

    That’s scary.

  5. WilliamLawrenceUtridge says:

    Wow, that Vanderbilt University page is crammed full of ureferenced nonsense. It doesn’t seem to discuss homeopathy, but it does enthusiastically endorse acupuncture, including the meridians-and-qi aspects.

    That’s scary.

  6. WilliamLawrenceUtridge says:

    Wow, that Vanderbilt University page is crammed full of ureferenced nonsense. It doesn’t seem to discuss homeopathy, but it does enthusiastically endorse acupuncture, including the meridians-and-qi aspects.

    That’s scary.

  7. WilliamLawrenceUtridge says:

    Wow, that Vanderbilt University page is crammed full of ureferenced nonsense. It doesn’t seem to discuss homeopathy, but it does enthusiastically endorse acupuncture, including the meridians-and-qi aspects.

    That’s scary.

  8. WilliamLawrenceUtridge says:

    There’s obviously something wrong with my web browser or IP. Can someone delete three of the above four comments?

    Please shake between deletions to maximize the power of those that remain.

  9. cervantes says:

    As the classic men’s room graffiti says, “Eat shit, it’s organic.”

  10. hat_eater says:

    peeing on one’s feet is a sure cure for athlete’s foot

    I wonder, would peeing on athlete’s feet cure my foot then? I have to try!

  11. David Gorski says:

    I do suffer from the societal taboo that piss is icky, and for aesthetic reasons urine is not something I would want to consume, even when it is referred to as its more common designation ‘Coors Light’.

    Bravo, sir. Well played.

    One quibble: Coors Light is too dilute to be equivalent to urine.

  12. The Coors Light line is the funniest thing I’ve read all week.

  13. A masterful post, with not a single reference to Bear Grylls or “taking the piss” joke. I salute you, sir.

    I have to wonder if all this wasn’t started by a golden shower queen indulging his/her fetish by proxy.

  14. Calli Arcale says:

    Or, as Eric Idle put it in a “Bruces” sketch in “Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl”,

    “American beer is like making love in a canoe.”
    “Making love in a canoe, why’s that, Bruce?”
    “It’s f—ing close to water.”

    Or there’s this one:

    There was an industry convention for beer makers. One evening, three of the corporate representatives found themselves in the hotel bar at the same time. The fellow from Miller ordered a Miller Lite. The man representing Coors ordered a Coors. And the gentleman from Guinness ordered a Coca-Cola. The other two reps looked at him in astonishment. “What, aren’t you going to order your own product?” asked the Coors man. The Guinness man shrugged and said, “Well, I figured if you guys weren’t drinking tonight . . . .”

  15. sowellfan says:

    Great article, as usual. It kills me that it needed to be written, though…

  16. Harriet Hall says:

    I know of one valid therapeutic indication for urine. If you lick something metal in the winter and your tongue freezes to it, getting a friend to pee on it will release your tongue. Of course, hot water would work even better, but it may not be as readily available.

  17. Costner says:

    Just when I think this website is devoted to factual scientific data and sound medical reasoning you go and make a quip about Coors Light……. and TOTALLY confirm my opinion of this being a website devoted to facts and legitimate science.

    Well played.

  18. daedalus2u says:

    Let me first say that I agree with Dr Crislip that urine is icky. I also agree that all of the conventional explanations about why ingesting urine or applying it to your skin have no actual basis in physiology.

    However, there is physiology which might explain why the practice developed in some regions. There are better alternatives that would be more effective (if these physiological explanations are correct) and not at all icky.

    There is considerable thought among nitric oxide researchers that nitrate in the diet is beneficial. The usual source is green leafy vegetables, which have a few thousand ppm nitrate. In Tibet, which is at high altitude, there are no green leafy vegetables and so there is no source of nitrate in the diet. Urine would be a source of nitrate. A common test for a UTI is to look for nitrite in the urine. Many of the bacteria that cause UTIs (E coli for example) reduce nitrate to nitrite. If you have nitrite in your pee, you likely have bacteria in your bladder.

    Nitrate is one of the terminal metabolites of nitric oxide. Humans and other mammals excrete nitrate in the urine, even in the absence of nitrate in the diet. Nitrate in the diet is well absorbed, and is concentrated ~10x from plasma into saliva. There are commensal bacteria which live in anaerobic crypts on the tongue and reduce the nitrate in saliva to nitrite. Nitrite containing saliva is swallowed and in the low pH of the stomach is reduced to nitric oxide. The head space of the stomach can exceed 100 ppm nitric oxide. Acidified nitrite in the gut is an important anti-bacterial agent the body uses as it tries to kill everything before it gets digested.

    Virtually every non-tropical culture has the custom of sweat baths. The custom of sauna dates to antiquity. My hypothesis is that stimulating sweating via external heat is a way to nourish the biofilm of ammonia oxidizing bacteria that I am working with. If there were no sources of fuel to generate heat for a sweat bath, then topical application of a source of urea or ammonia would have the same effect. There is very little fuel in Tibet, so sweat baths are not achievable. Urine has a lot of urea, so topical application of urine would be effective at nourishing a biofilm of ammonia oxidizing bacteria.

    This may be the source of the folk remedy of using urine for athletes foot. If you do have a biofilm of ammonia oxidizing bacteria on your feet, supplying them with urea would help them suppress any fungal infection.

    There is another folk remedy of peeing in the dirt and then applying that mud to the body. If there were ammonia oxidizing bacteria in the dirt, this could also supply NO and nitrite.

    Similarly the folk remedy for impotence, the golden shower, could have physiological effects via nitrate in urine.

  19. Costner says:

    The whole urine issue reminds me of Dr. Rashid Buttar. Remember him? The guy who claims he can reverse autism by rubbing a cream on the skin of children (some refer to this as Buttar’s Butter).

    Dr. Buttar also was a big fan of recommending the process of collecting urine from a child, filtering it, and then turning around and injecting it back into that child in order to strengthen the immune system.

    Oh yea… did I mention that Buttar claims he can cure cancer? How he has been overlooked by the Nobel Committee is beyond me.

  20. Ed Whitney says:

    When Morarji Desai was prime minister of India in the late 1970s, he drank his own urine every morning, having used this approach to treat his hemorrhoids decades earlier . I recall trying to imagine what would have happened if Jimmy Carter had announced that he did the same for his hemorrhoids (which he had surgery for while in the White House). Desai lived to the age of 100. The practice is unlikely to be lethal.

    In Coors country, it is sometimes spoken of as “downstream beer.”

  21. Fredeliot2 says:

    A great business idea. How about selling water that contains some water that has passed through the kidneys of some famous person from the past. We could sell water with some amount that was passed by Plato or Julius Caesar. The concentration would be greater than active ingredients in many homeopathic preparations. I read once that if you took a glass of water and tagged each molecule then mixed it evenly with all the water in the world, any glass of water would have 8000 tagged molecules.

  22. Very fun article Mark Crislip, although i do wish that I hadn’t read it as I sat down for lunch.

    Am I the only parent who’s relieved to have affirmation that pee is actually quite harmless?

    After changing diapers many times I feel very comfortable saying that temporary topical treatment with baby pee does not cure chapped and cracked hands, but I’m pretty sure it causes sleeplessness, because from the time I started changing diapers to the time that I stopped (when my youngest was around three) I never got a full night’s rest.

  23. weing says:

    I have another use for urine. If you’re stuck out in the wilderness and need to irrigate a wound, urine is a good substitute for saline. It’s hypertonic and sterile too, unless you have a UTI.

  24. ” If you lick something metal in the winter and your tongue freezes to it, getting a friend to pee on it will release your tongue. Of course, hot water would work even better, but it may not be as readily available”

    I’ve always thought that cupping your hands around your nose and mouth to trap the warth of your breath might do the trick, but never tested that idea.

  25. and wouldn’t warm water be easier to find than a ladder?, unless you happen to be laying down when you stick your tongue to the pole.

  26. windriven says:

    @michele

    “and wouldn’t warm water be easier to find than a ladder?, unless you happen to be laying down when you stick your tongue to the pole.”

    Sexist! You presume the friend to be a female.

  27. jpmd says:

    Remember the scene in Catch 22 where they switched out the IV and urine bags?

  28. Lytrigian says:

    “Are there uses for urine?”

    I assume you mean medical uses. Of course there are other uses for it. For instance urine (either human or horse) was once an essential ingredient in fine furniture finish. Nowadays makers of varnishes no longer have stables out back of the factory and tend to use urea from chemical supply companies rather than the golden elixir of their employees, but there you are.

    Similarly, we are now able to use other agents as mordants for fabric, and can prepare wool for dyeing without pissing on it first. Outside of Scotland, anyway.

    We also now have more effective grease removers than urine, so remember that next time you reach for the GoJo.

  29. windriven “Sexist! You presume the friend to be a female.”

    Actually, no.

  30. I am assuming that the unfortunate folks would be either elementary school kids or drunk off their ass, though.

  31. weing says:

    Urine was used as a mouthwash to treat gum disease. Urea is still one of the main ingredients in toothpaste.

  32. cloudskimmer says:

    I’ve heard the claim that urine is sterile (see ‘weing’ above) but it sounds implausible that anything as loaded with bacteria as the human body could produce something medically sterile; is this true? Is it as sterile as something coming out of an autoclave or sterile packaging?

  33. JPZ says:

    “Are there uses for urine?”

    In some parts of India, people add urine to clay to improve the quality of their bricks. Lytrigian’s list was more interesting, but I thought I might add this factoid.

  34. Harriet Hall says:

    ” it sounds implausible that anything as loaded with bacteria as the human body could produce something medically sterile;”

    Some parts of the human body are loaded with bacteria: the skin, mouth, intestines, etc. But there shouldn’t be any bacteria in other parts like the blood, kidneys, urine, brain, spinal fluid, etc. If bacteria are found in those places, it is diagnostic of an infection that needs treating.

  35. lilady says:

    Brilliant Dr. Crislip. I wonder how many people have “asparagus urine”? I do. I’ve researched it on the internet and it seems that approximately 40-50% of people have an enzyme that breaks down the compounds in asparagus that result in a pungent urination within a short time of consuming asparagus.

    Some have postulated that it is genetic and that you also need another specific gene to be able to smell the pungency…which apparently I have as well. Others have advanced the theory that everyone produces “asparagus urine” and unique to some people is the one gene that gives you the ability to detect the pungent smell.
    Genetically unique individuals have blogged about the smell and most describe it as mildly “skunk-like”; others say they smell asparagus in their urine. My olfactory gene tells me that the urine smells strongly of roasted-in-oil Planters peanuts in the can.

    Now I have done an informal survey of only my close friends and family comprised of perhaps 40-50 “subjects” and I only found one friend who actually shares my particular gene(s) and she tells me her urine smells like asparagus.

  36. Sadly, I have nothing witty to add. Mark Crislip is still one of my favorite writers on SBM, undisputed!

  37. Ken Pidcock says:

    “But there shouldn’t be any bacteria in other parts like the blood, kidneys, urine, brain, spinal fluid, etc. If bacteria are found in those places, it is diagnostic of an infection that needs treating.”

    Blood and CSF should be sterile in the absence of infectious disease, but not urine. As any MLS knows, you mustn’t leave urine sitting around. Blame the distal urethra; if it’s outside, it’s inhabited.

    Loved the Coors Light bit. I keep it around in the event I run out of distilled water.

  38. Harriet Hall says:

    Urine in the kidney and ureter is sterile. Bacteria in the bladder or urethra can indeed come from downstream.

  39. lilady says:

    Last night’s season premier of Saturday Night Live featured a hilarious skit. Alec Baldwin and Steve Martin did a routine where Baldwin provided some of his “urine” in a small plastic “specimen cup” to Steve Martin for analysis.

    Martin, in turn, took small sips of the “urine” and analyzed it for the presence of testosterone and steroids and pronounced that Baldwin was “clean”.

    Coincidence…or have the SNL staff been reading SBM blogs?

  40. Daniel Urbach says:

    I smell asparagus pee, and it smells like a mixture of asparagus and pee (surprise).

    My grandfather, a dentist who did research on the TMJ, created a mouthwash using mostly urea. He was convinced that it cured everything. He even treated a tree in his yard for some sort of fungus, and it seemed to work. His daughters (one of whom is my mother) are loyally still making and using it as mouthwash. I remember it being used on cuts and scrapes as a disinfectant when I was a kid.

    Great stuff, Mark.

  41. splicer says:

    It seems to me that even if the urine comes out sterile that it would not stay that way for long. A friend had an employee get a bad cut at work. He went to get his truck to take him to the ER and when the guy came over his arm was dripping more than blood. He made the guy hold his arm out the window on the way to the hospital.

  42. BillyJoe says:

    lilady,

    “Now I have done an informal survey of only my close friends and family comprised of perhaps 40-50 “subjects” and I only found one friend who actually shares my particular gene(s) and she tells me her urine smells like asparagus.”

    And then there were three!
    (The title of a Genesis album, in case you were wondering :))

    And, yes, it smells like asparagus.

  43. Calli Arcale says:

    micheleinmichigan, on pulling your tongue off of a flagpole in winter:

    I’ve always thought that cupping your hands around your nose and mouth to trap the warth of your breath might do the trick, but never tested that idea.

    My husband has done this, and it does work. (I have accidentally frozen my tongue to things three times, alas before I learned this trick. I left quite a bit of flesh behind.) The Mythbusters also tested it, first with a rather repulsive modified cow tongue, and then Tori tested it with his own. And it worked. Saliva can also be helpful — like urine and your breath, it will be body temperature to start with. The biggest key, it turns out, is simply to not panic and pull your tongue away *slowly*.

  44. relativitydrive says:

    That Vanderbilt University Post is awesome. Not only is the post by a PhD (I’m guessing in Psychology) but it has a crazy cat running around in circles at the bottom and a semi-nude woman with a glass of yellow stuff in her hand in what looks like Time Square right at the top so my work colleagues can see it.

    Talk about quality references.

    Is there going to be a post on the benefits of eating ones own…?

  45. Call Arcale “I have accidentally frozen my tongue to things three times, alas before I learned this trick. I left quite a bit of flesh behind.”

    I am very grateful for to hear that my idea has a reasonable chance of success, so I should probably resist saying this, but I expect to wake in the middle of the night wondering how one accidentally freezes one’s tongue to something once, much less three times.

    Didn’t you see A Christmas Story?

  46. gravespinner says:

    @lilady

    My wife and I and both our children have asparagus urine.

  47. whatnot says:

    To each his own, I suppose. It’s just not my cup of pee.

  48. rork says:

    Recommended non-medical uses:

    On plants in moderation, or on the compost pile. As most gardeners know, it saves water and applies nitrogen – anything else would be wasteful. In excess it will kill stuff though.

    Backpacking. You pee on the stove to warm it up before lighting, but pouring fuel over the stove and lighting (“priming the bomb”) is needed if it is really cold.

  49. Deetee says:

    I can’t look at posts written by “weing” without laughing, sorry.

  50. Draal says:

    One site notes there are 2 grams of protein and a 100 mg of glucose excreted the urine a day.

    I just measured my protein content using a BSA assay and I have <0.25mg/mL; I'd have to piss 8 L a day to equal 2 grams of protein.

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