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Cleveland Clinic Subscription Box Service Introduces Integrative Medicine to Curious Consumers

A young child opening a CAMCrates for Kids box, hoping for relief for her Childhood-Onset Qi Deficiency (COQD).

A young child opening a CAMCrate for Kids! box, hoping for relief from her Childhood-Onset Qi Deficiency (COQD)

Cleveland, OH- Cleveland native Kelly Anderson is looking forward to the end of the month like a young child anxiously awaiting Christmas morning. That’s because on a day between the 20th and the 28th of December, she will receive the gift of hope. Anderson, a 43-year-old mother of five who was diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease and numerous nutritional imbalances earlier this year by a Naturopathic doctor during a visit to discuss her unexplained fatigue, is part of a growing number of people interested in an alternative path to wellness.

CAMCrate, a new monthly subscription box service developed by the experts at Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Integrative and Lifestyle Medicine, will deliver boxes of high quality and thoroughly tested alternative medical experiences right to customer’s doorstep starting this month. Anderson, who learned about the new service during a routine check-up at the office of her Cleveland Clinic affiliated primary care doctor, is quick to point out that she loves her conventional medical doctor. “I’m not against Western scientific medicine, I’m just looking to augment it with something different, something special. Who doesn’t want a little magic and mystery in their lives?” (more…)

Posted in: Humor, Science and Medicine

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Homeopathic Syrup for the Treatment of Pediatric Colds: Randomized Controlled Nonsense is Still Nonsense

coughkid
According to the authors of the latest study claiming to demonstrate effectiveness of homeopathic remedies, colds are common in the pediatric population. They further explain that colds and cough symptoms are a frequent impetus for parents to seek pediatric medical care. Finally, they add that evidence in support of decongestants, antihistamines and cough suppressants for the treatment of pediatric cold symptoms is lacking and that there are significant potential risks with their use in young children.

All of this is true and information I give to medical learners and patient caregivers all the time. I only wish they had quit while they were ahead. Sadly, the authors of “A randomized controlled trial of a homeopathic syrup in the treatment of cold symptoms in young children” continued:

One option for treating cold symptoms in young children is with homeopathy. Because the concentrations of active ingredients in homeopathic medications are extremely dilute, they are generally considered to be safe. However, there is a widely held belief that any efficacy related to use of homeopathic remedies is related to a placebo effect.

(more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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Naturopaths Warn Parents of Halloween Candy Dangers

Halloween Handouts Have Horrendous Health Hazards

Halloween Handouts Have Horrendous Health Hazards

[Ed. Note: Dr. Jones had a Halloween-themed post in mind; so he and Dr. Gorski have basically switched places just for this week. Expect Dr. Gorski’s post later this week.]

Columbus, OH – Experts from the Columbus Naturopathic Medicine Center are warning parents of the dangers that may be waiting for their children on Halloween night, dangers like high-fructose corn syrup, gluten, trans fat, and artificial colors and flavors just to name a few.

“We want parents to understand what risks their children will be facing,” Tab Smiley, Chief of Pediatric Naturopathic Medicine and Nutrition at the center, explained. “These common Halloween candy ingredients are linked to childhood obesity, coronary artery disease, diabetes, body acidification, yeast overgrowth, and multiple chemical sensitivity.”

Smiley recommends that parents assess the nutritional information of each child’s candy haul prior to consumption in order to help prevent dangerous nutritional imbalances. Each individual treat should first be unwrapped and examined for sharp foreign objects or other obvious signs of tampering, and then melted down for evaluation using liquid chromatography and DNA fingerprinting when available. If unavailable, a naturopathic grade dowsing rod or pendulum may be substituted. Once deemed safe, a proving should take place in order to best determine an appropriate indication for each candy, followed by serial dilution and succussion in order to enhance flavor and potency. (more…)

Posted in: Humor, Science and Medicine

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An Update on FDA Concerns Over Homeopathic Teething Products

babybelladonna

Steven Novella recently wrote a post discussing an FDA warning against the use of homeopathic teething products over safety concerns related to the possibility of toxic amounts of belladonna. He goes into the hypocrisy of the FDA regulation of homeopathic products, a topic covered numerous times here on Science-Based Medicine, as well as the misleading initial response from Hyland’s, producers of the most popular homeopathic teething remedies in the United States and Canada. There have been some updates over the past two weeks that I’ll cover in this post. (more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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American Academy of Pediatrics Calls for End to Pediatric Codeine Use…Again

So, pretty please...with sugar on top. Stop prescribing codeine to kids.

So, pretty please…with sugar on top. Stop prescribing codeine for children.

The safe and effective management of subjective symptoms in the pediatric population, in particular pain, has always been difficult. Young patients, even premature infants at the limit of viability, experience pain, a fact that sadly was not widely accepted until the late last century. But even with full recognition of pain as a potential concern in all pediatric patients, undertreatment of pain remains a system wide issue.

Pediatric pain management is especially challenging for a variety of reasons. Overall there are fewer pediatric friendly pharmaceutical options to choose from and limited data on available pain medications for children, leaving pediatric providers fitting square pegs in the round hole of adult medicine. Further complicating the situation is the fact that kids can have significantly different absorption and metabolism of drugs compared to adults. Finally, young children are more likely to be undertreated because of the reluctance to prescribe, or to consent to the use of, opioid medications by providers and caregivers respectively.

As if things weren’t difficult enough, the AAP Section on Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine has published a clinical report in the September Pediatrics that aims to remind providers that it is “time to say no” to one of the our most popular pain medications: codeine. Sadly, the authors are not raising new concerns. Instead, they are once again pointing out serious problems with this drug, problems we have known about for over a decade that have resulted in deaths and inadequately treated pain.
(more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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Belly Button Healing: Science plus Magic for Only $99?

bellywand

The patient doesn’t choose the Healing Life Wand. The Healing Life Wand chooses the patient.

If you wanted to design and market an ineffective treatment with the best chance of successfully fooling consumers, it would have to include a certain set of key components in order to maximize profit. A connection to nature is extremely important, the more emotional the better. Although trickier to pull off, your product would need to call upon ancient wisdom while also being associated with cutting edge science. But keep the association vague and let the consumers connect the dots. A hint of conspiracy, where the consumer believes that they are being let in on a secret or suppressed cure helps too.

The mechanism of action should be unclear in order to avoid easy refutation, and should preferably involve concepts such as removing toxins and balancing energy or hormones. Again, it’s important to combine science with your magic, so include things like lymphatic drainage or increased blood flow. The ailments your treatment would remedy need to be subjective and likely to respond to numerous placebo effects. And the treatment should be simple, even a bit fun, in both concept and execution. Finally, throw in a catchy slogan or two and you’ll be rolling around on a pile of hundreds in no time at all.
(more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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An Unexpected Miscellany of Medical Malarkey

kidcupping

 

I had originally intended a focused discussion of a single topic, but life circumstances have conspired to prevent me from doing so.  In the place of my intended post, please enjoy the following collection of hastily assembled pseudomedical odds and ends brought to my attention over the past few weeks. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Science and Medicine

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Dana-Farber Cancer Center’s Integrative Medicine Expansion

Dr. Sidney Farber, shown here not believing in reiki or reflexology.

Dr. Sidney Farber, shown here not believing in reiki or reflexology.

In June, an article in the Boston Globe covered yet another incursion of pseudoscience into a major academic medical center, this time at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dana-Farber, located just a couple of miles from the library where I’m writing this post, has provided world-class care for children and adults with cancer since 1947. It’s kind of a big deal.

Sidney Farber, already known as the “father” of pediatric pathology, was the first person to induce remission in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which had a 100% mortality rate up to that point. He then went on to earn the title of “father” of modern chemotherapy by also curing Wilm’s tumor, a rare pediatric cancer of the kidneys. Farber, who was featured in the phenomenal book The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee, would almost certainly be opposed the double standard being employed to justify quackery in the facility bearing his name (or anywhere else).

To Farber, a scientific approach to treating pediatric cancer patients was paramount, even to the point where he at first refused to initiate the combination therapy that would open the age of modern chemotherapy because he wanted to protect children from a potentially haphazard rush to cure them. He wanted strict scientific protocols in place and assurances that the evidence would be followed regardless of the outcome, so that the intense desire to find a cure for children that otherwise faced only suffering and death would not add to that suffering. (more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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Separating Fact from Fiction in Pediatric Medicine: Facial Nerve Palsy

An infant with a left facial nerve palsy

An infant with a left facial nerve palsy

There are numerous medical conditions that are seemingly designed to allow proponents of “irregular medicine” to proclaim their treatments to be effective. These conditions tend to be chronic and subjective in nature, or to have waxing and waning courses such that a parent or patient might easily be fooled into assigning a causal relationship between a bogus intervention and a clinical improvement. Brief, self-limited maladies are also quite convenient for people with nothing to offer but false information and false hope. After a recent encounter with a patient, I’ve added a new one to the list: idiopathic facial nerve palsy.

What is idiopathic facial nerve palsy?

Although not the first to do so, facial nerve dysfunction resulting in the sudden and unexplained weakness of all muscles on one side of the face was most famously described by Scottish neurophysiologist Sir Charles Bell in 1830. Hence it is commonly, if not always accurately, referred to as “Bell’s palsy.” Since then our understanding of the condition has progressed considerably, thanks to scientific investigation and improved diagnostic testing. In particular, we have learned that many cases are the result of infection, with ear infections, various human herpes viruses, and the spirochete responsible for Lyme disease being the most common culprits in children. (more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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Robotically-Assisted Acupuncture Brings Ancient Healing Technique Into the 21st Century

An acupuncturist and acupuncture anesthetist perform robotically-assisted acupuncture on a patient who has been feeling kind of tired lately

An acupuncturist and acupuncture anesthetist perform robotically-assisted acupuncture on a patient who has been feeling kind of tired lately

Developed over many thousands of years (or maybe a little less), what has come to be known as traditional Chinese acupuncture has proven capable of curing or at least ameliorating the symptoms of a variety of medical conditions. But one of its greatest strengths, the intimate connection between the practitioner and the acupuncture needle, is also one of its most significant weaknesses. Taking advantage of the robotic technology being used by surgeons to perform an increasing number of minimally-invasive procedures, cutting edge acupuncture providers are now able to provide relief for patients that were once felt to be either poor candidates or had failed to improve despite treatments with traditional acupuncture by hand. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Humor

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