Author Archive

The War Against Chiropractors

In 2011, chiropractor J.C. Smith published The Medical War Against Chiropractors: The Untold Story from Persecution to Vindication. He promises an exposé comparable to Harriet Beecher Stowe’s exposé of slavery in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. His thesis is that the AMA waged a shameless attack on competition, motivated only by money. I think the reality is closer to what he quoted from Dr. Thomas Ballantine, Harvard Medical School:

The confrontation between medicine and chiropractic is not a struggle between two professions. Rather it is more in the nature of an effort by an informed group of individuals to protect the public from fraudulent health claims and practices.

The book is self-published, long-winded, repetitive, and flawed. It is a vicious screed crammed with bias, half-truths, insulting language, and innumerable references to Nazis and racial prejudice. In my opinion, Smith not only fails to make his case but degrades chiropractic.


Posted in: Book & movie reviews, Chiropractic, History

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Sports Physicals, Sudden Death, and Chiropractors

A correspondent sent me a link to an article about the decision of the Wichita Falls (Texas) Independent School District to recommend that chiropractors be allowed to give sports physicals to junior high and high school students. Current policy limits examiners to physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners. Adding chiropractors to this list would bring the district in line with policies in the rest of Texas, as well as in some other states. And it would “give parents more options.”

I’ve written about the attempts of some chiropractors to assume the role of family doctors and why I think it is a terrible idea. The idea of allowing them to do sports physicals impresses me as somewhat less terrible, but not by very much.

The Reasons for Requiring Sports Physicals

The goals of the Pre-participation Athletic Exam (PAE) include:

  • To identify athletes who should not participate because of high risk of injury or death
  • To identify those who require further evaluation or treatment so they can participate safely
  • To identify conditions that do not affect athletic participation but that should be treated
  • To possibly identify those at risk for substance abuse, depression, violence, etc.
  • To provide preventive health advice
  • To satisfy legal requirements. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Public Health

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Clinical Practice Guidelines: Cholesterol Tests for Children?

The American Academy of Family Physicians journal American Family Physician (AFP) has a feature called Journal Club that I’ve mentioned before.  Three physicians examine a published article, critique it, discuss whether to believe it or not, and put it into perspective. In the September 15 issue  the journal club analyzed an article that critiqued the process for developing clinical practice guidelines. It discussed how two reputable organizations, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) looked at the same evidence on lipid screening in children and came to completely different conclusions and recommendations.

The AAP recommends testing children ages 2-10 for hyperlipidemia if they have risk factors for cardiovascular disease or a positive family history. The USPSTF determined that there was insufficient evidence to recommend routine screening. How can a doctor decide which recommendation to follow? (more…)

Posted in: Diagnostic tests & procedures, Science and Medicine

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Thumbthing Worth Reading

I intended to read Sam Kean’s new book The Violinist’s Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius as Written by our Genetic Code  just for fun. I was expecting a miscellany of trivia loosely gathered around the theme of DNA. But I found something much more worthwhile that I thought merited a book review to bring it to the attention of our readers. Kean interweaves entertaining stories into a somewhat disjointed but nonetheless valuable history and primer of genetics. The title refers to Paganini, whose DNA created the unusual joint flexibility that facilitated his unprecedented feats of virtuosity on the violin.


Posted in: Basic Science, Book & movie reviews, Evolution, History

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The Obesity Paradox

Being fat is bad except when it’s good. It’s called “the obesity paradox.” (No, that isn’t a mis-spelling for “two physicians who treat fat people.”) The adverse health effects of obesity are well established, but there are exceptions. Obesity appears to confer an advantage in certain subgroups with conditions like heart disease and diabetes.

In the News

Casual consumers of some recent media reports might interpret them as an excuse to stop trying to lose excess weight, especially if they are diabetic. Others might think we have been lied to about the dangers of the obesity epidemic. The reality is more complicated. (more…)

Posted in: Nutrition

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Procera AVH: A Pill to Restore Memory

At the recent Amaz!ng (no, the ! is not a typo) Meeting in Las Vegas, Dr. Gorski, Dr. Novella, “Dr. Rachie” (Rachael Dunlop of Australia) and I participated in a workshop on “Dr. Google” about how to find reliable health information on the Internet. In my presentation, I described step by step how I researched a typical diet supplement product, Procera AVH. Later, one of our readers wrote to ask us about that very product, so I decided to convert part of my presentation into this blog post.

The Trigger

A half-page spread in my local newspaper proclaimed: “Memory Pill Does for the Brain What Prescription Glasses Do for the Eyes, Claims US Surgeon General Candidate.” It looked superficially like a news report, but it was actually an advertisement for the diet supplement Procera AVH. Closer inspection revealed the words “Paid advertisement” in tiny print, the required FDA disclaimer for diet supplements, a “Call Toll-Free” number and offers of a FREE Bonus Bottle, FREE book, and FREE supply of Rapid Detox Formula for First 500 Callers. (more…)

Posted in: Herbs & Supplements

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Learning from Animals: Evolutionary Medicine with a Twist

In 2005, cardiologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz was called to the zoo to examine a non-human patient, an emperor tamarin with heart failure.  She was surprised when the veterinarian told her not to look her patient in the eyes because eye contact could cause capture myopathy. In this condition, when an animal is captured, restrained, and feels threatened, there is a catastrophic surge of adrenaline that damages muscle tissues and can kill. It was described decades ago, but medical doctors don’t read the veterinary literature. It wasn’t until the early 2000s that American doctors began to recognize a similar phenomenon in human patients, takotsubo or stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

She began to wonder whether animals got other human diseases. She quickly learned that they did. Jaguars get breast cancer and may carry the same BRCA1 gene that plagues Ashkenazi Jewish women, rhinos get leukemia, penguins get melanoma, gorillas die from ruptured aortas, and koalas are in the midst of an epidemic of sexually transmitted chlamydia.  Wild dragonflies infected with parasites become obese and develop a form of metabolic syndrome. Pretty much every human disorder occurs in animals too.

With the help of writer Kathryn Bowers, she distilled her findings into a book: Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us About Health and the Science of Healing.  It’s a good read: informative, well argued, spiced with intriguing trivia, and more entertaining than a trip to the zoo. (more…)

Posted in: Book & movie reviews, Evolution, Veterinary medicine

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New AAP Policy on Circumcision

Back in 2008, I tried to look objectively at the scientific evidence for and against circumcision.  I got a lot of flak from commenters who focused on the ethical issues rather than the scientific evidence. I concluded that the evidence showed small benefits and small risks, and I didn’t advocate either for or against the procedure. At the time, the American Academy of Pediatrics’ position was:

Existing scientific evidence demonstrates potential medical benefits of newborn male circumcision; however, these data are not sufficient to recommend routine neonatal circumcision. In circumstances in which there are potential benefits and risks, yet the procedure is not essential to the child’s current well-being, parents should determine what is in the best interest of the child.

On August 27, 2012, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a revised Circumcision Policy Statement saying that the benefits outweigh the risks.


Posted in: Surgical Procedures

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Andrew Weil’s Seasonal Supplements

Dr. Andrew Weil has teamed with Innate Response Formulas to develop a series of seminars and a line of products for “seasonally appropriate integrative strategies.” Seasonal Therapeutics is a system for adjusting diet supplement recommendations according to the season of the year. To kick off the program, a one-day seminar was presented by Weil’s colleague Tierona Low Dog in Boston on August 25, 2012. It was approved for 8 CEU credits for DCs and NDs through the University of Bridgeport, a school that has ties to Sun Myung Moon’s Unification Church and offers degrees in naturopathy, chiropractic, and acupuncture. It cost $129 to attend the seminar, but participants were given a product credit of $129 so they could apply their newfound knowledge by buying Innate products. 

In a video, Dr. Weil acknowledges that the best nutrition is obtained through diet but says it is essential to take supplements as insurance against gaps in the diet.  He recommends Innate Response products because they are formulated with whole foods and contain accessory compounds that have health benefits. They are claimed to be “food, not chemicals” and “potent healing solutions.” They describe their seminars as “research based programs.”  

A series of seminar programs will address seasonal issues:

  • Autumn: Season of Harvest: focuses on liver and GI
  • Winter: Season of Reflection: focuses on immune and mood
  • Spring: Season of Renewal: focuses on purification and allergy
  • Summer: Season of Vitality: focuses on cardio and joint health. (more…)

Posted in: Herbs & Supplements

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