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Chiropractic and Stroke: The question is not answered

Extreme rotation of the atlas on the axis (at the atlantoaxial joint) stretches the vertebral artery.  In layman's terms, 40% of a hanging.

Extreme rotation of the atlas on the axis (at the atlantoaxial joint) stretches the vertebral artery. In layman’s terms, 40% of a hanging.

I am off to Chicago for 5 days to wow the SMACC crowd with my ID/SBM acumen. I hope. Given that most of my multiple-personalities do not seem to be able to get any work done, I am forced to write a brief post this week, limited by the battery life on my MacBook Air. Whatever I get down on paper? pixels? RAM? before the battery dies as I fly over the Rockies will be the post. It is times like this I wish I had Gorskian typing skills.

SBM has discussed the many limitations of chiropractic: the low grades for entry into chiropractic school, the inadequate training, their reason d’être, subluxations and their adjustments being divorced from reality, the lack of efficacy of chiropractic for any process beyond low back pain (and even that is no better than safer interventions), the fondness of chiropractors for other useless pseudo-medicines, and their opposition to vaccines.

Hm. When I put it like that chiropractic does appear a little sketchy. But is chiropractic safe? It is a hands-on intervention, for a brief period of time applying the same force to the neck as about 40% of hanging from the neck until dead. So there is certainly the potential for chiropractic to cause harm. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Clinical Trials

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Leaky Bowel

Pictured: Something you might need if you actually had a leaky gut.  Click to embiggen.  Weirdo.

Pictured: Something you might need if you actually had a leaky gut. Click to embiggen. Weirdo.

We are at a disadvantage. We have to rely on reality to validate the practice of medicine. Anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, chemistry, the basic sciences that made up the first two years of medical school education and a huge chunk of pre-med. And we have to rely on the truth, as slippery a concept as that can be. I can’t just make up a disease or a therapy.

It would be so much easier to not have to worry about reality in deciding on a disease and treatment for people with symptoms.

I came across “Healthy Life: Leaky Gut Syndrome” in my feeds. I am always attracted to exclamation marks! They must mean something important! Or surprising to the author!

It’s called “leaky gut syndrome” and patients say it can wreak havoc on everyday life, but some doctors say there’s no such thing!

Some doctors. Must be that pesky 10% percent or so of obstructionist doctors who don’t recommend Tylenol or Advil. (more…)

Posted in: Herbs & Supplements, Naturopathy, Nutrition, Science and Medicine

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Chiropractic Nose Balloons

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Pictured: Hobbit condom. Yup, it’s gonna get weird again.

You can pick your friends. You can pick your nose. But you can’t pick your friends nose.

Unless you practice Nasal Cranial Release.

There are so many pseudo-medicines, it is hard to keep track. New variations appear, new combinations of old SCAMs occur, old pseudo-medicines wax and wane, although no pseudo-medicine ever dies. Except phenology? Maybe? I find a few phrenology sites on the web, but I cannot tell if they are real or satire.

There is an ongoing discussion in my family as to the greatest band of all time. The Who is THE correct answer, but really, bands do not have to follow the Pauli exclusion principle. There can be multiple greatest bands of all time, all existing simultaneously at the same place. Except that The Who is a little bit more greater than the others. Yes. More greater.

The same concept applies to SCAMs. Whose goofiness reigns supreme? Homeopathy? Reiki? Epigenetic Birth Control? They are all equally goofy, each in their own special way.

In my feeds I saw the announcement that “Anderson Chiropractic Announces Nasal Cranial Release Therapy“. I had never heard of Nasal Cranial Release Therapy. It sounds bad, turning humans into a PEZ dispenser, popping off the skull by way of the nose, a particularly horrific form of rhinotillexomania. It’s not that goofy. But close. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic

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Lyme Testimony

The Lyme tick

The Lyme tick

As the saying goes, when you do not have the facts, argue the law. This tried and (?) true approach was successful in New York where a law was passed protecting those who are, shall we say, creative in treating patients with Lyme and ‘chronic’ Lyme.

The bill protects those from investigation of misconduct:

based solely on treatment that is not universally accepted by the medical profession.

The major bone of contention has been extended courses of IV antibiotics for ‘chronic’ Lyme, but there are a wide variety of treatments that may be used by so called “Lyme literate” doctors.

The number of therapies divorced from reality that are offered to Lyme patients is remarkable. I do not know if chronic Lyme patients have greater use of pseudo-medical therapies than other pseudo-diagnoses, but I am impressed by the offerings in a recent review:

Results. More than 30 alternative treatments were identified, which fell into several broad categories: these included oxygen and reactive oxygen therapy; energy and radiation-based therapies; nutritional therapy; chelation and heavy metal therapy; and biological and pharmacological therapies ranging from certain medications without recognized therapeutic effects on Borrelia burgdorgeri to stem cell transplantation. Review of the medical literature did not substantiate efficacy or, in most cases, any rationale for the advertised treatments.

Conclusions. Providers of alternative therapies commonly target patients who believe they have Lyme disease. The efficacy of these unconventional treatments for Lyme disease is not supported by scientific evidence, and in many cases they are potentially harmful.

(more…)

Posted in: Lyme, Politics and Regulation, Science and Medicine

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What Should We Do in the Absence of Evidence?

Pictured: Smarter than you.

Pictured: Smarter than you.

For every complex problem, there is an answer that is clear, simple—and wrong.

– H.L. Mencken

Despite my multiple personalities, it seems that only the OCD doctor gets anything done. The Goth cowgirl persona? Lazy. And the NBA playoffs are sucking up an inordinate amount of time. Go Blazers. Just not very far. Sigh. But what are you going to do. Work needs doing and someone has to do it.

This week was one of deadlines. In June I am giving a series of talks at the SMACC conference in Chicago and I have to have all my talks ready to go today. So sometimes to meet all my deadlines I need to re-purpose other material.

Spoiler alert: if you are going to be at SMACC and hear my lectures, stop reading here. Everything I am going say in 6 weeks will follow. And really even if you are going to SMACC, it is a content-free post. You might be better off spending your time elsewhere. (more…)

Posted in: Critical Thinking, Humor, Medical Academia, Science and Medicine

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Mediocre Expectations

Pictured: Relevant.  Oh yeah, it's going to get weird. Image courtesy of the Wellcome Trust Image Library via the Wikimedia Commons.

Pictured: Relevant. Oh yeah, it’s going to get weird.

I had a dickens of a time writing this entry. The last week has been spent in New York for NECSS. It is safe to say that New York has plenty of distractions for us Dug the Dog types. Reality may be a honey badger, but New York is a squirrel. I say that when I travel I usually do not come across food better than I can find in Portland. Nope. Not true of New York. It joins Paris and New Orleans in the holy trinity of good eats, although I will stick with Pacific Northwest beer. And the rule is that for every day you are gone, three days’ worth of work piles up. I really need to stop taking time off.

I spoke at NECSS on a favorite topic of mine, how acupuncture works. It doesn’t. But I discussed a few studies that I found interesting. Like all studies, no single paper is definitive. The third law of the medical literature states that for every study, there is an equal and opposite study. A bit of an exaggeration perhaps but I do find the direction that the following studies point interesting both as to acupuncture’s mechanism of inaction and how the mind functions, making them worth collecting in an essay. (more…)

Posted in: Science and Medicine

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FDA and Homeopathy: Part Two.

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Edward De Vere.  Sort-of.

Friends, FDA, countrymen, lend me your ears;

I come to bury Homeopathy, not to praise it.

The evil that homeopaths do lives after them;

The good is oft interred with their bones;

So let it be with Homeopathy. The noble Ullman

Hath told you homeopathy was effective:

If it were so, it was a grievous fault,

And grievously hath Homeopathy answer’d it.

Here, under leave of Ullman and the rest–

For Ullman is an honourable man;

So are they all, all honourable men–

Come I to speak in Homeopathy’s funeral.

It was my nostrum, faithless and worthless to me:

But Ullman says it was effective;

And Ullman is an honourable man.

He hath brought many provings home to HPUS

Whose prescriptions did the general coffers fill:

Did this in Homeopathy seem effective?

When that the ill have died, Homeopathy hath wept:

Efficacy should be made of sterner stuff:

Yet Ullman says it was effective;

And Ullman is an honourable man.

You all did see that on the Cochrane

I thrice presented Homeopathy a meta-analysis,

Which he did thrice refuse: was this efficacy?

Yet Ullman says it was effective;

And, sure, he is an honourable man.

I speak not to disprove what Ullman spoke,

But here I am to speak what I do know.

Edward De Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. Sort of.

We only have a vague idea as to what other bloggers are going to write about. Yesterday Jann wrote on the same topic (and Scott the week before), which I will read tomorrow after my post goes up. Why would I want my post to be informed by another’s well-reasoned and thoughtful essay? I have a reputation after all. So here is my response to the FDA. (more…)

Posted in: Homeopathy, Legal

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NECSS and SfSBM: A weekend of science and skepticism

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 1.35.26 PM

A day of Science-Based Medicine, a weekend of science and skepticism

NECSS, the North-East Conference on Science and Skepticism, is upon us. Included in the program will be a day of Science-Based Medicine.

Full Conference schedule here with Bill Nye as the Keynote speaker.

SfSBM speakers will be Harriet Hall, Jann Bellamy, David Gorski, Steve Novella and Mark Crislip.

SfSBM speakers will also participate in panels on the 11th and 12th.

NECSS will be held April 9th–12th, 2015, in New York City at the Fashion Institute of Technology.

Description: NECSS welcomes over 400 attendees to New York City for a celebration of science and critical thinking. Through individual presentations, panel discussions, and performances, attendees are informed and inspired by leading scientists, educators, activists, and performers – each bringing their own perspective and passion to the goal of fostering a more rational world.

The SfSBM program will be Friday, April 10 and you can attend one or more of the days. $95 for one day or $195 for the entire conference.  The target audience of the SfSBM presentations will be the general population.

SfSBM Program

09:00 – 10:00 60 minutes Registration/Will Call
10:00 – 10:10 10 minutes OPENING: Steve Novella and David Gorski
10:10 – 10:45 35 minutes: Steve Novella. SBM – Going Beyond Evidence-Based Medicine.
10:45 – 11:20 35 minutes: Harriet Hall. Chiropractic: Not All It’s Cracked Up To Be.
11:20 – 11:55 35 minutes: David Gorski. Integrative Medicine: Integrating Cow Pie with Apple Pie
11:55 – 12:30 35 minutes: Mark Crislip. How Acupuncture ‘Works’
12:30 – 02:00 90 minutes LUNCH
02:00 – 02:35 35 minutes Speaker 4: Jann Bellamy. Political Pseudoscience
02:35 – 03:35 60 minutes Panel  Placebo Effect and More
03:35 – 03:50 15 minutes BREAK
03:50 – 04:35 45 minutes Q&A from Twitter & Audience
04:35 – 05:20 45 minutes SBM Jeopardy
05:20 – 05:30 10 minutes CLOSING
05:30 – 06:00 30 minutes SBM Business Meeting

For more information and to register, go to NECSS or this registration page.

The Society for Science-Based Medicine is a co-sponsor of NECSS and paid SfSBM members can get a 15% discount using the code SFSBM2015.

Also at NECSS

 SGU Skeptical Extravaganza with guest star Bill Nye

 April 10, 2015 @ 7:30PM

Haft Auditorium, 227 W. 27th St., NY, NY 10001

Cost: $25 general public / $15 NECSS attendees

Website: www.necss.org/extravaganza

Special guest Bill Nye joins multi-talented musician George Hrab and the award-winning Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe podcast for a two-hour stage show celebrating science, skepticism, and everything geeky (including the ever-popular quiz show). Best of all, tickets are open to the general public; conference registration is not required to attend!

Posted in: Announcements

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Lyme: Two Worlds Compared and Contrasted

The Lyme tick

The western black-legged tick, carrier of the Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria which causes Lyme disease.

The practice of infectious disease (ID) is both easy and difficult. If you read my ID blog on Medscape you are aware of my trials and tribulations in diagnosing and treating infections.

ID is easy since, at least in theory, diseases have patterns and an infecting organism has a predictable epidemiology and life cycle. So if you can recognize the pattern and relate it to the life cycle and exposure history, you can often make a diagnosis before the cultures come back.

My favorite story is the time I was asked to see a young girl with endocarditis. The history was she had a week of fevers, headache and myalgia that went away for five days, returned for a week, went away for five days and returned yet again.

So I asked her “How was your vacation at Black Butte?”

The look of astonishment on her face as she asked how I knew she had been to Black Butte was so satisfying. (more…)

Posted in: Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation, Public Health, Science and Medicine

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Bias and Spin

We all construct our narrative based on our biases and spin the facts so that the narrative confirms our biases. Among other characteristics, what separates an SBM provider from a SCAM provider is realizing that biases are always active and apply to me as well as everyone else.

My biases are simple: I am skeptical that humans can reliably understand reality without assistance and the best source of assistance is science.

I have a job where the expectation is that I will change practice as information changes. How I practiced medicine 30 years ago is very different from how I practice it today. Still, I note it is harder and harder to change my approaches as I get older. I get more set in my ways and it takes more effort to change as new studies are published. Sometimes it seems almost physically difficult.

Again, it is expected that not only will I change my mind over time, as the sole ID doctor at my hospitals, I will be the one to lead the change. Imagine how much harder it would be to change your mind if you were committed to a universal truth such as those that are alleged to underlie reiki or chiropractic. Years committed to a pseudo-medicine probably renders changing one’s mind virtually impossible. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Science and Medicine

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