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Archive for Homeopathy

FDA efforts to improve compounded drug safety upsets naturopaths

herbs-nd1
Favorite naturopathic treatments comprise pumping patients full of dubious mixtures by injection, including IV drips. Naturopaths also employ topicals (salves, ointments and creams), rectal, and vaginal suppositories, and oral medications, such as bio-identical hormone replacement therapy, all made from “natural” substances.

According to the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP)

these nutritional, herbal and homeopathic remedies are compounded to meet unique patient needs and are not typically available from the large drug manufacturers that don’t make small batches of such specialized products.

Not to mention the fact that it is highly doubtful these questionable remedies could make it through the FDA drug approval process, which requires proven safety and efficacy.

The FDA’s recent steps to improve drug compounding safety is a welcome curb on these practices. Draft Guidance issued in April addresses both compounding for office use and by prescription. (“Office use” refers to creating a supply of a compounded drug to be used by a health care practitioner as needed, as opposed to compounding a drug per a specific prescription for an individual patient.) In June, the FDA also issued an Interim Policy on substances that can be used in compounding a drug. We’ll discuss how these affect naturopathic practice in a moment. (more…)

Posted in: Guidelines, Herbs & Supplements, Homeopathy, Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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A systematic review about nothing

Water
There is dubious content in PubMed that you won’t find unless you look for it, or stumble across it inadvertently. It’s the entire field of alternative medicine which is abstracted and complied along with the actual medical literature. In this world, the impossible is accepted as fact, and journal articles focus on the medical equivalent of counting angels on pinheads. I’ve been trying to avoid blogging about alternative medicine practices like homeopathy lately because the practice itself is a scientific dead end. There is no emerging evidence or interesting research to describe, because there is no science to build on. But research on homeopathy is interesting if one wants to understand how placebo effects can appear to be real. Importantly, research and clinical trials of homeopathy allow us to see the underlying (baseline) challenges, flaws, and biases in evaluating real medicine more clearly. Today I want to review a newly-published systematic review of, adverse effects attributed to homeopathy. The casual reader might not see the multiple problems with this type of research. But once you understand the basis of homeopathy, the conclusion that one can draw is quite different from that of the author’s. And if inert sugar pills can appear to have medicinal effects, and even adverse effects, then we can better adjust for these biases when we’re studying actual medicine. (more…)

Posted in: Clinical Trials, Homeopathy

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About Herbs: an app to avoid

Pictured: A better source of health information than "About Herbs".

Pictured: A better source of health information than “About Herbs”.

Medicine has an intellectual hierarchy. Supposedly the best and the brightest are in the academic medical centers and are the thought leaders in their field.

Those of us lower in the hierarchy are well aware of some of the warts present on our betters, but I would expect those at the top would adhere to the highest intellectual and ethical standards. People being, well, people, expecting exceptional standards is admittedly an unrealistic expectation.

It would appear that many academic centers are doing their best to avoid meeting my expectations, attempting to abandon all standards.

I mentioned over at SfSBM that Dana-Farber is spending 2 million dollars on a renovation to, in part, offer the unmitigated steer manure that is reiki and reflexology to their cancer patients. Yes. Reiki. Reflexology.

Those are not fracking earthquakes in Kentucky, those tremors are the result of the tremendous kinetic energy of Flexner spinning in his grave as his life’s work becomes a farce.

Dana-Farber is just one of many academic medical centers who are putting their imprimatur on nonsense.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Integrative has released “About Herbs”, an iPad/iPhone guide to Botanicals, Supplements, Complementary Therapies and More. Spoiler alert: the ‘More’ does not include critical thinking. This guide is not anywhere as ludicrous as offering reeky, sorry, reiki, but at times it comes close. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Commentary, Critical Thinking, Herbs & Supplements, Homeopathy, Traditional Chinese Medicine

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Bye Bye Bravewell

Bravewell Collaborative

Exactly one year ago tomorrow, The Bravewell Collaborative shut down, an event so momentous that few seem to have noticed. It’s been a while since we at SBM devoted much attention to Bravewell, although, at one time, its doings were a regular feature of SBM posts.

For those of you not familiar with Bravewell, a brief history. The main mover and shaker behind The Bravewell Collaborative was Christy Mack, wife of former Morgan Stanley head John Mack and a financier of sorts in her own right. She and the widow of another Morgan Stanley bigwig, Susan Karches, neither of whom had any particular expertise in finance, managed to get about $220 million in bailout funds from the Federal Reserve, a boondoggle recounted in Matt Taibbi’s 2011 hilarious Rolling Stone article, “The Real Housewives of Wall St.” Ms. Mack had established the Bravewell Collaborative a few years earlier, with her own contributions and that of other philanthropists, as a private operating foundation, a further opportunity to benefit from government largesse in the form of tax deductions.

Here’s Bravewell’s definition of “integrative medicine”:

Integrative medicine is an approach to care that puts the patient at the center and addresses the full range of physical, emotional, mental, social, spiritual and environmental influences that affect a person’s health. Employing a personalized strategy that considers the patient’s unique conditions, needs and circumstances, integrative medicine uses the most appropriate interventions from an array of scientific disciplines to heal illness and disease and help people regain and maintain optimal health.

(more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Energy Medicine, Homeopathy, Medical Academia, Naturopathy

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Nobody licenses quacks in my state! HB 4531 and the licensing of naturopaths in Michigan

Just as nobody steps on a church in Peter Venkman's Manhattan, nobody licenses quacks in my state...I hope.

Just as no giant marshmallow man steps on a church in Peter Venkman’s Manhattan, nobody licenses quacks in my state…I hope.

Over the years, I’ve taken care of women with locally advanced breast cancer so advanced that it’s eroded through the skin, forming huge, nasty ulcers filled with stinky dead cancer tissue that’s outgrown its blood supply, leaving the patient in chronic pain. If the patient is fortunate, her cancer has not metastasized beyond her axillary lymph nodes (the lymph nodes under her arm), and her life might still be saved by a combination of chemotherapy, radical surgery, and radiation. If the patient is not fortunate, either the cancer has metastasized and she is doomed or hasn’t metastasized yet, but it’s invaded into the chest wall and the nerves in her axilla (the structures under the arm), making it impossible to remove surgically but not likely to kill her any time soon. In the latter case, chronic pain, infection, and blood loss is what the patient will look forward to until the cancer either metastasizes or invades a vital structure. Fortunately, I’ve only seen a handfull of these patients over the last 20 years. Fortunately, the number of such patients I’ve seen and taken care of has been small.

I fear that, before long, I’m going to bee seeing a lot more of them. Leave it to Jann Bellamy to wake me up to that possibility.

I’m referring, of course, to her post last week about yet another attempt by naturopaths to expand their scope of practice. Worse, this is happening in my state through Michigan House Bill 4531, which has been approved by the Michigan Committee on Health Policy and referred to the full House for consideration. Yes, of these patients I’ve seen with horrific neglected breast cancers, at least half of them had relied on naturopaths before they came to the attention of real oncologists and surgeons. The last time I wrote about naturopaths trying to expand their scope of practice in my state was in 2013 in the form of a bill that was not as broad as HB 4531, namely HB 4152. Fortunately, it went nowhere and, in contrast to HB 4531, didn’t even make it out of the Committee on Health Policy.

Although Jann has already ably discussed the bill and occasional Science-Based Medicine (SBM) contributor Peter Lipson has referred to naturopaths as fake doctors in white coats (which is true), as well as why naturopathy is unscientific and how he as a primary care internist not infrequently has to clean up the messes left when local naturopaths treat patients incompetently, this is my state, and I can’t help but chime in myself. What I will try to do is to predict what the potential consequences will be if HB 4531 passes and expands the scope of practice to be nearly as broad as that of MDs practicing primary care medicine. I will do that by looking at real world examples of naturopathic shenanigans and disasters both within our very own state, because these are the people with whom the reins of primary care will be shared if HB 4531 were to pass.
(more…)

Posted in: Homeopathy, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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The “Incoherent Mess” That Is Homeopathy: Old and New Insights

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Back in 1943 a Dutch physician, David Karel de Jongh, wrote a PhD dissertation on homeopathy. It was based on his experience working in a homeopathic hospital and on all the published information he could find, and was highly critical of homeopathy. It was an impressive opus, with over 200,000 words. It is way too long for the average reader to wade through; and since it is in Dutch, few of us could read it even if we wanted to. Jan Willem Nienhuys, secretary of the Dutch skeptics’ organization Skepsis, has done us a great favor by summarizing its contents and updating it with information about recent developments. He has kindly had his summary translated into English and published in full on the Skepsis website. He comments “Basically Dr. de Jongh’s conclusions were that homeopathy is an incoherent mess.”

We all should know by now how monumentally silly homeopathy is (“delusions about dilutions”). I had investigated the subject and knew enough about it to have written about it repeatedly, but there is much more that I didn’t know. Nienhuys’ article is full of surprising facts and fascinating details. (more…)

Posted in: Homeopathy

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Medical exemptions to vaccine mandates for sale after SB277! Get ’em before they’re gone!

NOTE: Anyone who has seen several derogatory articles about me on the web and is curious about what the real story is, please read this and this.

SB277, which eliminates nonmedical exemptions to school vaccine mandates in California, is a very good law, but it's not perfect. Unfortunately, one provision allows the issuance of medical exemptions based on the say-so of doctors using antivaccine misinformation and pseudoscience.

SB277, which eliminates nonmedical exemptions to school vaccine mandates in California, is a very good law, but it’s not perfect. Unfortunately, one provision allows the issuance of medical exemptions based on the say-so of doctors using antivaccine misinformation and pseudoscience.

I realize that it’s a cliché to say so, but some clichés are true. Time really does fly. It’s hard to believe that a year ago California—and, by proxy, the rest of the country—was in the throes of a major political war over the bill SB277. SB277, you will recall, was a bill introduced into the California Assembly in the wake of the Disneyland Measles outbreak in early 2015 that eliminated non-medical exemptions to school vaccine mandates beginning with the 2016-2017 school year. Ultimately, SB277 passed and was signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown last July. It was an uncommon victory for science and public health, and already appears to be having a positive effect on vaccine uptake in kindergarten children.

Unfortunately but not unexpectedly, to say that the proposal and passage of SB277 into law drove the antivaccine movement into even greater fits of crazy in response is to put it mildly. It became a common trope on antivaccine websites and blogs to see SB277 compared to fascism, in particular the Holocaust. Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and “Dr. Bob” Sears explicitly compared SB277 to the Holocaust. Truly, the Godwin was strong in the antivaccine movement. One particularly offensive meme that went around at the time consisted of antivaccinationists suggesting that SB277 was a major step in the direction of requiring unvaccinated children to wear a badge or armband to identify themselves, the way that the Nazis required Jews to wear badges or armbands with a yellow Star of David on them. One, Heather Barajas, even went so far as to be photographed with her children wearing such an “unvaccinated” badge and juxtapose that photo with photos of Jews from the Third Reich wearing yellow Stars of David.
(more…)

Posted in: Homeopathy, Politics and Regulation, Public Health, Vaccines

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April Fool Cannot Surpass SCAM

Stick some coffee up the tailpipe and you've got yourself some complementary and alternative auto care!

Stick some coffee up the tailpipe and you’ve got yourself some complementary and alternative auto care!

It’s April Fools’ day in the US of A. One of the internet traditions is to come up with a story that is weird or unlikely, but not so weird or unlikely that it is not believable, in order to fool people that the story is real.

I gave it the old SBM try, I really did, but I couldn’t do it. I wanted to come up with a SCAM therapy so weird, so unlikely, that I could not find an example of it actually being practiced.

It can’t be done. Like a Trump utterance*, you can’t invent a SCAM (Supplements, Complementary and Alternative Medicine) that someone, somewhere, has already pulled out of, er, well, thin air and are using it on patients.

Of course, what would you expect given that many SCAMs were in fact, pulled out of, er, well thin air. Think chiropractic and DD Palmer, iridology by August von Peczely, and reiki by Mikao Usui. Making up fantastical stuff is what they do.

But even within the spectrum of pseudo-medicine there are those are practices and papers that are so bizarro they should be an April Fools’ joke. But are not. It may be a matter of taste, what one person considers wack-a-loon another would find imminently reasonable. There are certainly assigned delegates that prove that assertion. But even within the wack-a-loon world of SCAM, there are those practices and papers that are more wack-a-loon than others and should be April Fools’ jokes. Maybe it is like more unique. Unique is one of a kind, so something can’t be more one of a kind. More wack-a-loon? Such is the world of SCAM. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Energy Medicine, Homeopathy, Medical devices, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation, Science and Medicine

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Oregon Health & Science University SCAM Day

From the Wikimedia Commons, originally posted by Flickr user Alex E. Proimos (link)

From the Wikimedia Commons, originally posted by Flickr user Alex E. Proimos (link).  Oy.

I was looking over a recent class catalog from my alma mater, University of Oregon. I see the Astronomy Department is having a day devoted to astrology, inviting astrologers to talk about their profession. And the Chemistry department is having alchemists give an overview on how to change base metals into gold. And, to green our energy, the Physics Department, where I acquired my undergraduate degree, is having a symposium on perpetual motion machines. I am so proud.

I kid.

But not when it comes to SCAM (Supplements, Complementary and Alternative Medicine). Medicine is strange in that has no issues embracing pseudo-science. My medical school, OHSU, had an afternoon devoted to Integrative Medicine for the third year medical students, with lectures by a chiropractor, a traditional Chinese pseudomedicine practitioner, a naturopath and an integrative medicine practitioner. They also had a small group discussion of a case of irritable bowel syndrome where one of the discussion leaders was a……Qi……….Gong………..master. Really. I would be so pissed if I was going $166,000 in medical school debt and I was being taught about the approach to ANYTHING by a Qi Gong Master. It was a day to ignore that whole ‘science’ thing in the name of the school. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Homeopathy, Medical Academia, Naturopathy, Science and Medicine

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American Journal of Public Health article touts “potential public health benefits” of homeopathy

Homeopathy: It's just water.

Homeopathy: It’s just water.

An article in the April, 2016 issue of the American Journal of Public Health caught my eye: “Homeopathy Use by US Adults: Results of a National Survey.” I was pleased to see that homeopathy use is actually quite low. The 2012 National Health Survey found that only 2.1% of U.S. adults used homeopathy in the last 12 months, although that was a 15% increase over 2007. Users were mostly young, white, well-educated women, the typical CAM consumer.

Even fewer saw a homeopathic practitioner (only 19% of all users), although those who did perceived a greater benefit from homeopathic remedies. This difference, speculate the authors, could be due to several factors, one of which is

a more individualized and effective homeopathic prescription by the provider.

What? Are the authors suggesting that the series of off-the-wall questions asked by homeopaths leads to a prescription of an “effective” homeopathic remedy?

They certainly seem to be. Who are these authors, anyway?

They are Michelle L. Dossett, MD, PhD, MPH, Roger B. Davis, ScD, Ted J. Kaptchuk, and Gloria Y. Yeh, MD, MPH. All are, or were, with the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. All are also connected with Harvard and work, in various ways, in “integrative medicine” research. The article was funded, in part, by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, and in part by Harvard. (more…)

Posted in: Clinical Trials, Homeopathy, Medical Academia, Public Health, Vaccines

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