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State Medical Boards should not recognize board certification in “Integrative Medicine”

The Integrative Medicine Wheel: False hope and lies

The Integrative Medicine Wheel: False hope and lies

There are a number of things about so-called “integrative medicine” (or, “IM”) we don’t know, such as

  • Whether IM really offers the best of conventional medicine and CAM.
  • Whether IM produces better outcomes.
  • Whether IM is effective in the area of prevention, including obesity and cardiovascular risk.
  • Whether IM has anything to offer preventive medicine.
  • Whether future IM research will yield beneficial results.
  • Whether IM has a positive impact on utilization clinical preventive services, smoking cessation, diet, and physical activity.
  • Whether IM is cost effective.

We don’t even have a working definition of “integrative medicine,” although experience tells us that incorporating diagnoses and treatments with insufficient evidence of safety and effectiveness is an acceptable element of integrative practice, as is rebranding “conventional” practices as “integrative.”

Normally, these substantial deficiencies would get in the way of declaring that IM is anything like a real specialty in medicine. Indeed, as David Gorski has pointed out, IM is more of a brand than a specialty. Yet, as we do know, integrative medicine considers itself exempt from the rules. Thus, a few years ago, Andrew Weil, MD, an early adopter in incorporating pseudoscience into medical practice, announced his desire to create of a board certification in integrative medicine. No doubt aware that IM couldn’t fulfill the requirements of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), he turned to the American Board of Physician Specialties (ABPS), whose requirements for Board recognition are more forgiving. For example, the ABPS is willing to credit work experience as a prerequisite to board certification, as opposed to residency and fellowship training. Sure enough, a few years ago, the ABPS formally accepted board-certification in IM via the ABPS’s recognition of the American Board of Integrative Medicine (ABOIM). (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Energy Medicine, Herbs & Supplements, Homeopathy, Legal, Medical Academia, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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“Donald Trump’s presidential election win stuns scientists”

Trump is OK with pseudoscience

Trump is OK with pseudoscience

Scientists in the U.S. and from around the world are weighing in on Donald Trump’s election as the next president of the most powerful country on earth:

Trump will be the first anti-science president we have ever had . . . The consequences are going to be very, very severe.

Michael Lubell, director of public affairs for the American Physical Society in Washington, DC:

I am simply stunned. . . Trump’s election does not bode well for science or most anything else of value.

Neal Lane, a Democrat who led the National Science Foundation and served as White House science adviser under President Bill Clinton, now a physicist and university professor at Rice University in Houston, Texas:

It’s going to be critically important for researchers to stand up for science.

Jennifer Zeitzer, director of legislative Relations at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology in Bethesda, Maryland:

I do breast cancer research for my PhD . . . Scared not only for my future but for the future of research and next years @NIH budget.

Sarah Hengel, a graduate student at the University of Iowa in Iowa City:

This is terrifying for science, research, education, and the future of our planet . . . I guess it’s time for me to go back to Europe.

María Escudero Escribano, a postdoc studying electrochemistry and sustainable energy at Stanford University in California:

(more…)

Posted in: Critical Thinking, Herbs & Supplements, Legal, Obstetrics & gynecology, Politics and Regulation, Public Health, Science and the Media, Vaccines

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California legislature should repeal naturopathic licensing

california-state-seal
On January 1, 2018, the California Naturopathic Doctors Act will be automatically repealed unless the California Legislature deletes or extends that date during the 2017 legislative session, which convenes on December 5, 2016. In addition, according to California law, the Naturopathic Medicine Committee of the Osteopathic Medical Board of California, which regulates naturopathic doctors (NDs), is subject to review by “appropriate policy committees of the Legislature” in the upcoming session.

The California Legislature should not extend the date of the Naturopathic Practice Act. Currently licensed naturopathic doctors could be allowed to continue their practices under a substantially revised practice act but no new licenses should be issued. Frankly, I do not think naturopaths, whether they claim they are “doctors” or not, should be allowed to practice at all. However, the political realities of getting a bill passed completely doing away with the practice of naturopathy may require some accommodation to currently licensed NDs. (more…)

Posted in: Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation, Vaccines

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Natural Health Products: Loosely regulated, little evidence of benefit, and an industry intent on preserving the status quo

Shouldn't you know that the pills you are paying for are safe, and actually do something?

Shouldn’t you know that the pills you are paying for are safe, and actually do something?

This week’s post will revisit a topic I recently covered, but it’s time-sensitive and needs your input. Health Canada, the Canadian equivalent to the US Food and Drugs Administration, is considering revisions to the way in which it regulates dietary supplements, which are called “natural health products” in Canada. It is rare that a regulator acknowledges that a regulatory system isn’t working, and publicly expresses a commitment to being more science-based. There is a time-limited opportunity for the public (including all of you non-Canadians!) to provide comment on how supplement regulation could be more closely aligned around scientific principles, rather than the supplement industry’s priorities. Whether you take dietary supplements or not, we can probably all agree that consumers should have access to safe products as well as credible, relevant information about these products, in order to make informed health decisions. It will likely not surprise you that these ideas are seen as threats to supplement manufacturers, who benefit from little regulatory oversight and few restrictions on what can currently be claimed about any product’s effectiveness. Since my last post, there have been some new reactions to the consultation that are worth discussing. (more…)

Posted in: Herbs & Supplements, Legal, Politics and Regulation

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Is there a distinct standard of care for “integrative” physicians? The Woliner case

Board certification in family medicine and "integrative" medicine: different standards of care?

Board certification in family medicine and “integrative” medicine: different standards of care?

Florida Atlantic University student Stephanie Sofronsky was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2011, after review of her case by oncologists and pathologists at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, the NIH/National Cancer Institute, and the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. By June of that year, a PET scan showed the cancer had progressed to her pelvic region. She decided to be treated locally by oncologist Neal Rothschild, MD, and met with him to discuss chemotherapy and ongoing management of her cancer. At this point, with Stage III Hodgkin’s lymphoma, she had an 80-85% chance of being in complete remission with appropriate treatment.

Unfortunately, at the same time, Sofronsky was also seeing Kenneth Woliner, MD, a family medicine practitioner. Despite the fact that world-renowned cancer specialists agreed that Sofronsky had Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and knowing that she was about to start chemotherapy, Dr. Woliner told Sofronsky that cancer was “low on his list” of possible medical concerns and that increased lymphoctyes shown in her tests were not indicative of cancer, insinuating that oncologists “often overreact” to the presence of lymphocytes and recommend chemotherapy before making an actual diagnosis. Dr. Woliner suggested instead that Sofronsky have her house tested for mold, which could be causing allergies, and therefore her symptoms. Convinced, Sofronsky pursued treatment for her allergies and cancelled her follow-up appointment with Dr. Rothschild.

Sofronsky complained repeatedly to Dr. Woliner of symptoms that were, as our good friend Orac points out, consistent with progressing lymphoma – back pain and pain and swelling in her lymph nodes, abdomen and legs, to the point of having to use a cane. Yet, Dr. Woliner, over the next couple of years, continued to attribute her symptoms mostly to her allergies and also thyroid issues and some other minor illnesses. On February 7, 2013, at her last visit to his office and in significant distress from pain and severe leg swelling, he ordered a 100 mg shot of iron, despite the fact that her blood tests showed she was not iron deficient. She rapidly decompensated and died in the hospital three days later of from complications of untreated Hodgkin’s lymphoma. (more…)

Posted in: Cancer, Ethics, Health Fraud, Herbs & Supplements, Legal, Politics and Regulation

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Personal Care Products Safety Act: Facelift for FDA Regulation or Lipstick on a Pig?

Ad from the 1930s, when cosmetics regulation was last addressed by Congress.

Ad from the 1930s, when cosmetics regulation was last addressed by Congress.

The U.S. cosmetics industry, the largest in the world, is expected to reach $62 billion in revenues in 2016. Yet, despite the fact that its products are regularly applied to, and absorbed by, the body’s largest organ (the skin) and even ingested in small amounts, the cosmetics industry is largely self-regulating.

There are over 57,000 different chemicals used in cosmetics. According to one research report, on average, women use 12 personal care products every day, exposing themselves to 168 chemical ingredients. Men use about half that, but still expose themselves to 85 unique chemicals a day. Many of these may be perfectly safe, we just don’t know which ones because most have not been tested for safety.

Increasing concerns about everything from contact dermatitis to carcinogens led Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-California) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) to introduce the Personal Care Products Safety Act, giving the FDA greater regulatory oversight of the cosmetics industry. The Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions held a hearing, “Exploring Current Practices in Cosmetic Development & Safety” last Thursday. A similar bill has been introduced in the House of Representatives. At least one other House bill was introduced in 2013 attempting to strengthen FDA regulatory authority over cosmetics, but it went nowhere. (more…)

Posted in: Cancer, Legal, Politics and Regulation

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FTC Sues Predatory Journal

Pictured: Peer review; something that doesn't happen in predatory journals

Pictured: Peer review; something that doesn’t happen in predatory journals

Because I have a university e-mail address I frequently get spam from journals I have never heard of soliciting submissions, and even offering editorial positions. I have generally ignored them, and it’s probably a good thing.

Over the last decade we have seen the rise of open-access science journals. The idea is a good one – journals charge a moderate fee to publish an article to cover costs, and then make all articles freely available online. It is a great way to leverage the power of the internet and make published science freely available. This contrasts to the subscription model where published research often sits behind a very expensive paywall.

The problem with the open-access model is that it created the means to easily generate income through predatory behavior. All you need is a website and minimal infrastructure and you can look like a real journal. Since authors are paying you to publish each article, just publish anything that gets submitted.

(more…)

Posted in: Legal, Medical Academia

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Nada for NADA: “acudetox” not effective in addiction treatment

NADA auricular acupuncture
The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) teaches and promotes a standardized auricular acupuncture protocol, sometimes called “acudetox.” NADA claims acudetox

encourages community wellness . . . for behavioral health, including addictions, mental health, and disaster & emotional trauma.

I do not know what “community wellness” is or how one measures whether wellness has been successfully “encouraged.” In any event, in the NADA protocol, acupuncture needles are inserted bilaterally into the auricle (outer portion) of the ear at a depth of 1-3 mm at five specific points (sympathetic, shen men, lung, liver, and kidney) and left in place for 45 minutes.

And:

Beyond the actual needling treatment, a key element of the protocol specifies qualities of behavior and attitude on the part of the clinician, consistent with what is known as the Spirit of NADA.

NADA claims there is

strong evidence for the effect of the NADA protocol in improving patient outcomes [in addiction treatment] in terms of program retention, reductions in cravings, anxiety, sleep disturbance and need for pharmaceuticals.

(more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Clinical Trials, Legal, Politics and Regulation

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Legislative Alchemy 2016 Update: Acupuncturists win; naturopaths and chiropractors don’t (so far)

Legislative Alchemy

Legislative Alchemy

Legislative Alchemy is the process by which state legislatures transform pseudoscience and quackery into licensed health care practices. By legislative fiat, chiropractors can detect and correct non-existent subluxations, naturopaths can diagnose (with bogus tests) and treat (with useless dietary supplements and homeopathy) fabricated diseases like “adrenal fatigue” and “chronic yeast overgrowth,” and acupuncturists can unblock mythical impediments to the equally mythical “qi” by sticking people with needles. In sum, by passing chiropractic, naturopathic, acupuncture, and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practice acts, states license what are essentially fraudulent health care practices and give them an undeserved imprimatur of legitimacy.

Only 6 of the 50 state legislatures are in regular session now. Many have ended two-year (2015-2016) consecutive sessions in which legislation from one year carries over into the next. The Texas, Montana, and North Dakota legislatures didn’t meet at all in 2016.

During 2015-2016, over a dozen naturopathic licensing or registration bills and at least 15 naturopathic practice expansion bills were introduced. (In some states, companion bills were introduced in each house. These were counted as one bill.) At least 19 chiropractic practice expansion bills were introduced in the same period. Four acupuncture/TCM practice acts were introduced, as were 14 practice expansion bills. This count does not include bills trying to force public and private insurers to cover CAM practitioner services.

(more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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FDA efforts to improve compounded drug safety upsets naturopaths

herbs-nd1
Favorite naturopathic treatments comprise pumping patients full of dubious mixtures by injection, including IV drips. Naturopaths also employ topicals (salves, ointments and creams), rectal, and vaginal suppositories, and oral medications, such as bio-identical hormone replacement therapy, all made from “natural” substances.

According to the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP)

these nutritional, herbal and homeopathic remedies are compounded to meet unique patient needs and are not typically available from the large drug manufacturers that don’t make small batches of such specialized products.

Not to mention the fact that it is highly doubtful these questionable remedies could make it through the FDA drug approval process, which requires proven safety and efficacy.

The FDA’s recent steps to improve drug compounding safety is a welcome curb on these practices. Draft Guidance issued in April addresses both compounding for office use and by prescription. (“Office use” refers to creating a supply of a compounded drug to be used by a health care practitioner as needed, as opposed to compounding a drug per a specific prescription for an individual patient.) In June, the FDA also issued an Interim Policy on substances that can be used in compounding a drug. We’ll discuss how these affect naturopathic practice in a moment. (more…)

Posted in: Guidelines, Herbs & Supplements, Homeopathy, Legal, Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation

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