Articles

Archive for Public Health

Epiphany

The Institute of Medicine report is a frequent ‘rebuttal’ to science based/real medicine. The argument is usually phrased something to the effect that since medicine can be dangerous, SCAM’s are legitimate. Of course, one does not follow the other. It is the equivalent of saying since you are old, bald and pudgy, I am young, have a full head of hair, and are thin. If every doctor and hospital were to vanish tomorrow like an episode of the Outer Limits, SCAM’s would be just a ineffective.

Despite the flawed logic of the comparison, I have always had an affinity for the estimates that 44,000 to 98,000 were (note the deliberate use of the past tense) killed each year in hospitals. There may be methodological flaws in the estimate but the ballpark figure is probably correct.

(more…)

Posted in: Public Health, Science and Medicine

Leave a Comment (57) →

New Data on Cell Phones and Cancer

This is a science and medicine story we have been following for a while – out of personal and scientific interest, and the need to correct confused or misleading new reporting on the topic. Are cell phones linked to an increased risk of brain cancer or other tumors? New data is reassuring.

David Gorski and I have both written on this topic. To give a quick summary, there is no convincing data to link cell phone use and brain cancer. Epidemiological studies have not found an increase in the incidence of brain cancer following the widespread adoption of cell phones in the mid 1990s – as one would expect if there were a causal relationship. Further, large scale studies have not found any consistent correlation between cell phone use and brain cancer.

It is clear from the literature that there is no measurable increased risk from short term cell phone use – less than 10 years. There is no evidence to conclude that there is a risk from long term use (> 10 years) but we do not yet have sufficient long-term data to rule out a small risk. Further, the data is somewhat ambiguous when it comes to children – still no convincing evidence of a link, but we cannot confidently rule out a link.

(more…)

Posted in: Cancer, Public Health

Leave a Comment (41) →

The 2008-2009 Report of the President’s Cancer Panel: Mostly good, some bad, and a little ugly

Mark Crislip is always a hard act to follow, particularly when he’s firing on all cylinders, as he was last Friday. Although I can sometimes match him (and, on rare occasions, even surpass him) for amusing snark, this time around I’m going to remain mostly serious because that’s what the subject matter requires. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I’m a bit of an odd bird in the world of cancer in that I’m both a surgeon and I run a lab. Sadly, there just aren’t very many surgeons doing basic and translational research these days, thanks to declining NIH funding, increasing clinical burden necessitated by declining reimbursements, and the increasing complexity of laboratory-based research. That’s not to say that there aren’t some surgeons out there doing excellent laboratory research, but sometimes I feel as though I’m part of an endangered species, particularly years like this when grants are running out and I need to renew my funding or secure new funding, the consequence of failure being the dissolution of my laboratory. It’s a tough world out there in biomedical research.

As tough as biomedical research is in cancer, to my mind far tougher is research trying to tease out the relationship between environmental exposures and cancer risk. If you want complicated, that’s complicated. For one thing, obtaining epidemiological data is incredibly labor- and cost-intensive, and rarely are the data clear cut. There’s always ambiguity, not to mention numerous confounding factors that conspire to exaggerate on the one hand or hide on the other hand correlations between environmental exposures and cancer. As a result, studies are often conflicting, and making sense of the morass of often contradictory studies can tax even the most skillful scientists and epidemiologists. Communicating the science and epidemiology linking environment and cancer to the public is even harder. What the lay person often sees is that one day a study is in the news telling him that X causes cancer and then a month later another study says that X doesn’t cause cancer. Is it any wonder that people are often confused over what is and is not dangerous? Add to this a distinct inability on the part of most people, even highly educated people, to weigh small risks against one another (an inability that has led to phenomena such as the anti-vaccine movement), and the task of trying to decide what is dangerous, what is not, how policy is formulated based on this science, and how to communicate the science and the policy derived from it to the public is truly Herculean.
(more…)

Posted in: Cancer, Politics and Regulation, Public Health

Leave a Comment (29) →

Outbreaks

There have been, in the last 20 years, natural, or perhaps unnatural, experiments that have helped shed light on the efficacy of vaccines.  Many societies, for reason of political unrest, religion, or a lack of understanding of science and medicine have seen the rates of vaccination decline and, with that decline, an increase in the cases of vaccine-preventable diseases.

Infectious disease spread in populations is not simple.  Hygiene, nutrition, access to health care, and education all play a role in the spread of communicable diseases.  Vaccines have been critical in driving the rates of vaccine preventable illnesses to almost zero, but they are not the only intervention in our armamentarium. (more…)

Posted in: Public Health, Vaccines

Leave a Comment (86) →

A Welcome Upgrade to a Childhood Vaccine – PCV 13

Children aren’t supposed to die.  That so many of us accept this statement without a blink is remarkable and wonderful, but it is also a very recent development in human history.  Modern sanitation, adequate nutrition, and vaccination have largely banished most of the leading killers of children to the history books.  Just look at the current leading causes of childhood death in developing countries to see how far these relatively simple interventions have taken us.

As we have systematically removed the leading infectious killers of children from prominence, other organisms have naturally risen to the top of the list.  This has lead some to the fatalistic (and mistaken) conclusion that we are simply opening up niches to be inevitably filled by other virulent organisms.  This assumes that there is some mandated quota of say, meningitis, that children must suffer every year, and if one organism doesn’t meet this quota then another will fill it.  Were this the case, after vaccination we’d expect to see a shift in the causes of meningitis, but at best a transient drop in the total number of cases per year as other bugs step in to pick up the slack of their fallen, virulent, meningitis-inducing brethren.  Such is not the case.

Though new organisms are now the leading causes of invasive bacterial infections in children, and we have indeed seen some increases in non-vaccine targeted strains, as I’ll discuss below, the total number of such infections has dropped precipitously.  It’s fair to say that the vaccination program has done a remarkable job improving a child’s chance of surviving to adulthood in good health.  However, no one in their right mind would argue that the current state of affairs, as good as it is, is good enough, and so we have shifted our sights to the current leading cause of invasive bacterial infections in children, Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumo, or pneumococcus). (more…)

Posted in: Public Health, Science and Medicine, Vaccines

Leave a Comment (126) →

Changing Climate, Changing Infections

I will state my bias up front.  I am convinced by the preponderance of data in favor of man made global warming.  At the most simplistic level, I can’t see how converting humongous tons of fossil fuel into C02 and dumping it into the the atmosphere cannot have effects on the climate.  To my mind its like determining vaccine efficacy or evolution.  Plausible mechanism(s), good basic science, multiple studies using different lines of evidence that all come to the same conclusion.  There are lots of fine points and nuances to be worked out, but the basic truth is reasonable and well defined. Infectious diseases lend some validation to the concept that world is warming, since with global warming will come a variety of infectious diseases.
It is one big IF THEN statement.  IF global warming, THEN infections.  Of course the if the IF is not true, then the THEN doesn’t follow.
There is the weather, which the Action Channel News never seems to get right, and I will spare you the Mark Twain quote even though I think he is our best writer ever,  and there is the climate, the summation of weather over time.
Interestingly, infections have probably altered climate for short periods of times.  Through history humans burned trees releasing C02, chopped down forests for agriculture and raised animals, releasing methane.  As humans populations increased, both C02 from burning and methane from animals increased as well.  Every now and then large numbers of people have died off.  It happen when Columbus et. al. brought infections to the New World and when plague came to the Old.  People died.  Maybe 90% in the Americas (estimates vary widely) and 2/3’s of Europe died.  As a result, burning and agriculture decreased, decreasing emissions and forests grew back, sequestering C02.  And temperature rise slowed or decreased (http://stephenschneider.stanford.edu/Publications/PDF_Papers/Ruddiman2003.pdf).
“Abrupt reversals of the slow CO2 rise caused by deforestation correlate with bubonic plague and other pandemics near 200-600, 1300-1400 and 1500-1700 A.D. Historical records show that high mortality rates caused by plague led to massive abandonment of farms. Forest re-growth on the untended farms pulled CO2 out of the atmosphere and caused CO2 levels to fall. In time, the plagues abated, the farms were reoccupied, and the newly re-grown forests were cut, returning the CO2 to the atmosphere…Moreover, if plague caused most of the 10-ppm CO2 drops… it must also have been a major factor in the climatic cooling that led from the relative warmth of 1000 years ago to the cooler temperatures of the Little Ice Age.”
Like all good scientists, he notes the problems with his conclusions
“A more complete assessment of the role of plague- driven CO2 changes in climate change during the last millennium would require a narrowing of uncertainties in both the spatial and temporal occurrence of plague and in the amount of farm abandonment (and reforestation), as well as a resolution of the inconsistencies among the CO2 trends from different Antarctic ice cores.”
This kind of study will never be reported in the Atlantic; too much nuance.
It is not the correction for global warming I would suggest, an Earth Abides die off of humans.  But it is an fascinating association between infectious human deaths and global warming.
As the weather changes, for a week, a season, or a over longer period of time, the incidence and distributions of  infections change.  Infections could increase or decrease due to something as simple as temperature or humidity.
Or it could be more complex.  Increase rainfall could lead to more food, which could lead to a boom in the rodent population leading to more interactions of humans and mice and the next thing you know you have bubonic plague in India or Hanta virus outbreak in the four corners of the US.
The daily weather makes a difference in infection risk.  My favorite example is Legionella pneumonia, which increases shortly after thundershowers and humid weather.  It explains why we do not have a lot of Legionella in the NW despite all the rain; it is rarely hot and humid.
In Philadelphia  Legionella
“Cases occurred with striking summertime seasonality. Occurrence of cases was associated with monthly average temperature (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per degree Celsius, 1.07 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.09]) and relative humidity (IRR per 1% increase in relative humidity, 1.09 [95% CI, 1.06-1.12]) by Poisson regression analysis. However, case-crossover analysis identified an acute association with precipitation (odds ratio [OR], 2.48 [95% CI, 1.30-3.12]) and increased humidity (OR per 1% increase in relative humidity, 1.08 [95% CI, 1.05-1.11]) 6-10 days before occurrence of cases.”
I ask the housestaff to look for Legionella after thundershowers and I usually get a case or two, although it may just be due to increased diagnostic testing.
Can you catch a cold when the weather is cold? Maybe.  It has been a topic of interest for years (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2279651/)
“The average outdoor temperature decreased during the preceding three days of the onset of any RTIs, URTI, LRTI or common cold. The temperature for the preceding 14 days also showed a linear decrease for any RTI, URTI or common cold.  (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18977127).”
More interesting are the infections associated with El Nino oscillations, where the ocean temperatures vary on a 3 to seven to year cycle, leading to alternating wet and dry weather.  As a result
“In North America, El Niño creates warmer-than-average winters in the upper Midwest states and the Northwest, thus reduced snowfall than average during winter. Meanwhile, central and southern California, northwest Mexico and the southwestern U.S. become significantly wetter while the northern Gulf of Mexico states and Southeast states (including Tidewater and northeast Mexico) are wetter and cooler than average during the El Niño phase of the oscillation. Summer is wetter in the intermountain regions of the U.S. The Pacific Northwest states, on the other hand, tend to experience dry, mild but foggy winters and warm, sunny and early springs.”
Changes due to the El Nino lead to changes in the incidence of a huge variety of infections: an example, I think, from WHO.
Climate change will affect the distribution of disease vectors such as insects and snails.  Vectors may thrive with increased temperatures or they may die off, but more likely the vectors, like mosquitos, will move.  It has been estimated that half of everyone who has every died has died from a mosquito borne illness (I admit I heard this numoerous times at ID lectures but do not have reference, at least there is a solution . http://mashable.com/2010/02/12/mosquito-death-ray-video/).  As it gets warmer, mosquitos can either go up in elevation or North.  It seems that they are doing both.
– Dengue has appeared at higher altitudes than previously reported in Costa Rica (at 1,250m),and in Colombia and India (at 2,200m).The previous range was temperature limited to approximately 1,000 metres above sea level.
– In Mexico, the dengue vector (Aedes aegypti) has been detected at 1,600 metres; transmission of dengue was unknown above 1,200m before 1986. There have been cases of dengue near or above the altitude or latitude limit of transmission and would be vulnerable to the small increases in temperature that have occurred across these regions.
– Other examples of climate-related changes in the prevalence or distribution of pathogens and their vectors include the resurgence of Mediterranean spotted fever in Spain and Italy, the recent epizootic of African horse sickness in Iberia,the resurgence of plague in parts of southern Africa,increased incidence and geographic spread of algal blooms, outbreaks of opportunistic infections among seals,and the spread and establishment of pathogens and vectors in Switzerland.  http://archive.greenpeace.org/climate/impacts/erwin/3erwin.html
– Dengue has, by serology, infected 40% of the populations of Brownsville Texas, as the disease slowly moves north.
“In the fall of 2004, during a period of endemic dengue transmission, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in these two cities,4 and dengue incidence and prevalence were measured. In Brownsville, the incidence was 2%, which, if extrapolated to the 2005 population of the city (using the 95% confidence interval), projected between 837 and 5,862 recent infections. Similarly, the prevalence was 40%, with a range from 56,948 to 75,372; these values are relatively similar to those obtained from Brownsville in 2005. http://www.ajtmh.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/361”
More than mosquito born illnesses are changing in prevalence.  Hanta is increasing in Belgium.  There has been increased temperature which has lead to increased broadleaf trees, with increased seeds, with increased voles, which carry Hanta, which infected humans to cause renal failure (http://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/8/1/1).
Oceans are getting warmer and supporting infections.  Vibrio was not found in Alaskan oysters as the water was too cold.  The water temperature was always less than 15 C.  No longer.  The mean temperature has increased each year since 1997  and now supports the growth of V. parahaemolyticus with resultant outbreaks (http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/353/14/1463).  Many other infectious diseases are increasing as well http://www.thebulletin.org/web-edition/columnists/laura-h-kahn/the-threat-of-emerging-ocean-diseases.
However, not all is doom and gloom.  Some infections may fade with global warming. For example, RSV may be disappearing as England warms.
“The seasons associated with laboratory isolation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (for 1981–2004) and RSV‐related emergency department admissions (for 1990–2004) ended 3.1 and 2.5 weeks earlier, respectively, per 1°C increase in annual central England temperature ( and .043, respectively). Climate change may be shortening the RSV season. http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/500208.”
Diseases that may increase in the US or become endemic again include malaria, dengue, and Leishmaniasis.  A 4 degree rise in temperature could allow dengue to exist as far north as Winnipeg and malaria to be in all of Europe. Seems to be a good trade off to me: more dengue and malaria, less RSV.
Good times for an infectious disease doctor.
These studies are representative of the literature, not a comprehensive review of the topic.  Personally, I find this adjunctive data compelling  support of global warming, at least over recent times (deliberately worded to not commit to the meaning of recent.)  This does not include all the other potential interactions between human behaviors and changes in the weather to result in an increase in infectious diseases.  Even simple local changes can lead to the unexpected increase in the risk of diseases.
“Adjustable rate mortgages and the downturn in the California housing market caused a 300% increase in notices of delinquency in Bakersfield, Kern County. This led to large numbers of neglected swimming pools, which were associated with a 276% increase in the number of human West Nile virus cases during the summer of 2007.”   http://www.cdc.gov/eid/content/14/11/1747.htm
All the neglected pools became mosquito breeding grounds, and the disease spread was exacerbated in part by a drought that altered bird populations from resistant finches to susceptible sparrows that were not immune to west nile, allowing the disease to spread.  The result, I suppose, of failed flock immunity.
Imagine how war, human migration, starvation will interact with climate change to increase or alter the spread of malaria, Tb and some infection that no one can predict.  If H1N1 proved anything, it is whatever new infection will sweep  across the county, it will not be the infection we predict. Who would have thought in 1989 that the next decade would see West Nile virus, never seen the the US, arrive to the continent in a migrating goose and become endemic.
Maybe its just the weather, the season, or the climate.  I think these are a few interesting infectious disease associations that lend credence to climate change.

“Conversation about the weather is the last refuge of the unimaginative.” – Oscar Wilde

I will state my bias up front.  I am convinced by the preponderance of data in favor of man made global warming.  At the most simplistic level, I can’t see how converting humongous tons of fossil fuel into CO2 and dumping it into the the atmosphere cannot have effects on the climate.  To my mind its like determining vaccine efficacy or evolution.  Plausible mechanism(s), good basic science, multiple studies using different lines of evidence that all come to the same conclusion.  There are lots of fine points and nuances to be worked out, but the basic truth is reasonable and well defined. Infectious diseases lend some validation to the concept that the world is warming, since with global warming comes a variety of infectious diseases.

It is one big IF:THEN statement.  IF global warming, THEN infections.  Of course  if the IF is not true, then the THEN doesn’t follow.

(more…)

Posted in: Public Health, Science and Medicine

Leave a Comment (114) →

The General Medical Council to Andrew Wakefield: “The panel is satisfied that your conduct was irresponsible and dishonest”

BACKGROUND

In my not-so-humble opinion, the very kindest thing that can be said about Andrew Wakefield is that he is utterly incompetent as a scientist. After all, it’s been proven time and time again that his unethical and scientifically incompetent “study” that was published in The Lancet in 1999 claiming to find a correlation between vaccination with MMR and autistic regression in autistic children with bowel symptoms was at best dubious science and at worst fraudulent. For one thing, as investigative journalist Brian Deer found, Wakefield was in the pocket of trial lawyers, who were interested in suing vaccine manufacturers, to the tune of £435,643 in fees, plus £3,910 expenses beginning even before his infamous “study” started accruing patients. Even though the study itself used the typical careful and relatively neutral language that we all expect from scientists, Wakefield himself was not nearly so circumspect. In a press conference announcing the Lancet study, he said:

He told journalists it was a “moral issue” and he could no longer support the continued use of the three-in-one jab for measles, mumps and rubella.

“Urgent further research is needed to determine whether MMR may give rise to this complication in a small number of people,” Dr Wakefield said at the time.

And so began one of the most contentious health stories of this generation.

Wakefield’s Lancet paper, even interpreted as sympathetically as possible, concluded nothing that justified such language. Yet his rhetoric, along with sensationalistic and credulous British journalists, ignited a firestorm of fear over the MMR that has not yet subsided now, over a decade later. Vaccination rates plummeted in the UK, and measles, a disease once thought to be under control, has surged back and become endemic again. It is a feat that Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey appear to be trying to replicate right here in the U.S. with their wonderfully Orwellian-named Green Our Vaccines activism and ceaseless promotion of anti-vaccine messages.

More recently, at the Autism Omnibus hearings, we learned from a world expert in the polymerase chain reaction, Dr Stephen Bustin, that the techniques used in the laboratory running PCR on the clinical specimens from Wakefield’s clinical trial were so shoddy, so devoid of routine controls necessary in any PCR experiment, that the measles sequences reported as amplified in Wakefield’s followup to his Lancet study were false positives derived from plasmids with measles sequences in them contaminating the laboratory. Then, in late 2008, Mady Hornig and colleagues at Columbia University published an attempted replication of Wakefield’s study. They failed. There was no association between vaccination with MMR and autistic regression, nor could Hornig find any evidence that measles in the gut was any more common in the autistic children studied than in the neurotypical controls. This study was particularly devastating to Wakefield because it was carried out by a researcher who had previously been sympathetic to the myth that vaccines cause autism, as evidenced by her infamous “rain mouse” study and, even more close to home, using the same laboratory that had performed Wakefield’s PCR, which had apparently cleaned up its act in the years following its work on Wakefield’s specimens.

When it comes to the science, there is no doubt. No reputable scientist has been able to replicate Wakefield’s findings, and there is a remarkable convergence and agreement of findings of major studies looking for a correlation between MMR vaccination and autism: There ain’t one. Indeed, closing out 2009 was the publication of yet another study that failed to find any correlation between MMR and autism, or, as I put it at the time, yet another nail in the coffin of the myth that the MMR vaccine causes autism. Andrew Wakefield’s repeated claims that the MMR can cause or “trigger” autism in some children is deader than dead as a scientific hypothesis and without a basis in scientific or clinical evidence. True, Wakefield tried to counter with a horribly unethical and badly designed primate study that seemed custom-designed to be used in court rather than in the court of scientific inquiry. It didn’t help and only made Wakefield’s Thoughtful House, Wakefield’s Fortress of Solitude in Texas to which he retreated in the wake of the revelations about his conduct, look even worse. Even a credulously “balanced” TV story by NBC news and Matt Lauer couldn’t hide the dubiousness nature of what goes on there.

Of course, while the science refuting Wakefield’s pseudoscience and evidence showing Wakefield to be incompetent and unethical continued to roll in, a little less than a year ago, it got even worse for him. Brian Deer reported that Wakefield very well may have engaged in scientific fraud in the “research” (and I do use the term loosely) that led to the publication of his Lancet paper in 1999. Through it all, the General Medical Council began an inquiry into whether Andrew Wakefield behaved unethically in the “research” that resulted in his 1999 Lancet report. It should be pointed out that the investigation of the GMC began before Deer’s latest revelation of potential fraud; rather it was far more concerned with how Wakefield ran his study and recruited patients. Nonetheless, the revelations nearly a year ago about Wakefield’s playing fast and loose with research methodology could not help but contribute to the sense that the Good Ship Wakefield had been torpedoed below the water line and was taking on water fast.

As the investigation and hearings wound on seemingly endlessly for two and a half years, Wakefield’s supporters intermittently waged an increasingly histrionic and ridiculous propaganda offensive to try to preemptively discredit the GMC’s findings. As it became clear that finally after all this time the GMC was on the verge of announcing its ruling, I noticed that the anti-vaccine crank blog Age of Autism was ramping up an increasingly bizarre and unhinged last minute propaganda campaign, complete with reposting a hilariously inapt post by Mark Blaxill comparing Wakefield to Galileo and the GMC to the Inquisition, complete with references to Stalin and Mao (I suppose I should be relieved that Blaxill refrained from playing the Hitler card); a defense of “that paper” by Wakefield himself; claims that parent witnesses had been “silenced” at the GMC hearings; and a whole series of posts by John Stone trying to discredit the GMC.

And then on Thursday, the GMC ruled.

(more…)

Posted in: Politics and Regulation, Public Health, Science and the Media, Vaccines

Leave a Comment (34) →

The Tamiflu Spin

I will start, for those of you who are new to the blog, with two disclaimers.

First, I am an infectious disease doctor. It is a simple job: Me find bug. Me kill bug. Me go home. I spend all day taking care of patients with infections. My income comes from treating and preventing infections. So I must have some sort of bias, the main one being I like to do everything I can to cure my patients.

Second, in 25 years I have, to my knowledge, accepted one thing from a drug company. The Unisin (that’s how I spell it) rep, upon transfer from my hospital, sent me a Fleet enema with a Unisin sticker on it. I show it proudly to all who enter my office. I do not even eat the drug company pizza at conference, and I cannot begin to tell you painful that is.

As we leave (I hope) the H1N1 season and enter seasonal flu season, there has been a flurry of articles, originating in the British Medical Journal , questioning whether oseltamivir is effective in treating influenza. The specific complaint at issue is whether or not oseltamivir prevents secondary complications of influenza like hospitalization and pneumonia. Although you wouldn’t guess that was at issue from the reporting.  As always, there is what the data says, what the abstract says, what the conclusion says, and what other people say it says.  Reading the medical literature is all about blind men and elephants.

There is, evidently, going to be an investigation by the European Union Council of Europe  into whether or not the H1N1 pandemic was faked to sell more oseltamivir. Sigh.
(more…)

Posted in: Pharmaceuticals, Politics and Regulation, Public Health, Science and the Media

Leave a Comment (36) →

e-Cigarette Safety

Ever since news of the harmful effects of tobacco smoke hit the public consciousess around the middle of the 20th century the tobacco industry and others have been looking for a “healthy” alternative. Are e-cigarettes just latest in a list of failed attempts to make smoking safe?

In case you are a new visitor to our planet (welcome) using tobacco products has been determined to be a significant risk factor in developing certain kinds of lung cancer and vascular disease, including strokes and heart attacks (the top three killers).  The tobacco industry initially tried desperately to deny or downplay the scientific evidence for the health risks of smoking, engaging in a campaign of doubt and confusion, but those efforts ultimately failed.

Some companies marketed light, low tar, and filtered cigarettes with the claim, direct or implied, that they were a more healthful alternative to regular cigarettes. However, there has never been convincing evidence that such cigarettes are less of a health risk. Still, the marketing stuck and now 90% of all cigarettes sold are filtered.

(more…)

Posted in: Public Health

Leave a Comment (87) →

The anti-vaccine movement strikes back against Dr. Paul Offit

In my five years in the blogosphere, two years blogging for SBM, and over a decade in Internet discussion forums about medicine and “alternative” medicine, I’ve learned a few things. One thing that I’ve learned is that one of the biggest differences between those whose world view is based on science and who therefore promote science-based medicine and those promoting pseudoscience, quackery, and anti-science is that science inculcates in its adherents a culture of free, open, and vigorous debate. Indeed, to outsiders, this debate can seem (and sometimes is) vicious. In other words, if you’re going to be a scientist, you need to have a thick skin because you will have to defend your hypotheses and conclusions, sometimes against some very hostile other scientists. That same attitude of a Darwinian struggle between scientific ideas, with only those best supported by evidence and with the most explanatory power surviving, is a world view that those not steeped in science have a hard time understanding.

Among those who don’t understand science, few have a harder time with the rough-and-tumble debate over evidence and science that routinely goes on among scientists than those advocating pseudoscience. Indeed, in marked contrast to scientists, they tend to cultivate cultures of the echo chamber. Examples abound and include discussion forums devoted to “alternative” medicine like CureZone, where never is heard a discouraging word — because anyone expressing too much skepticism about the prevailing view on such forums invariably finds himself first shunned by other members of the discussion forums and then, if he persists, booted from the forum by the moderators. In marked contrast, on skeptical forums, most of the time almost anything goes. True, the occasional supporter of woo who finds his way onto a skeptical forum will face a lot of criticism, some of it brutal. However, rarely will such a person be banned, unless he commits offenses unrelated to his questioning of scientific dogma, such as insulting or abusive behavior towards other forum participants or trolling. Such people may annoy the heck out of us skeptics sometimes, but on the other hand, they do actually from time to time challenge us to defend our science and prevent us from becoming too complacent. Indeed, that’s what I like about skeptics and being a scientist. Nothing or no one is sacred.
(more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Politics and Regulation, Public Health, Vaccines

Leave a Comment (41) →
Page 18 of 29 «...101617181920...»