Search Results for "nccam"

  1. Bastions of quackademic medicine: Georgetown University
    The cover of Georgetown Medicine Spring/Summer 2015 issue. This image will drive Mark Crislip crazy, as it features yet another acupuncturist not using gloves while sticking needles into people. Dr. Gorski loves watching Dr. Crislip’s reactions to such photos. We frequently discuss a disturb…
  2. Should physicians and managed care organizations offer homeopathy?
    Anyone who reads Science-Based Medicine on even a semi-regular basis will know our collective opinion of homeopathy. Basically, at its core, homeopathy is pure quackery. I don’t care if it’s repetitive to say this yet again because it can’t be emphasized enough times that homeopat…
  3. NCCIH and the true evolution of integrative medicine
    There can be no doubt that, when it comes to medicine, The Atlantic has an enormous blind spot. Under the guise of being seemingly “skeptical,” the magazine has, over the last few years, published some truly atrocious articles about medicine. I first noticed this during the H1N1 pandemic…
  4. Remembering Wallace Sampson
    Wally Sampson, MDMarch 29, 1930 – May 25, 2015 I’m sad to report that Dr. Wallace (Wally) Sampson, one of the original authors at Science-Based Medicine, passed away on May 25th at the age of 85. Wally was a valued member of the SBM community, a mentor to many of us, and a tireless crusade…
  5. Clinical trials of homeopathy versus “respect for science”
    A few months ago, Steve Novella and I published an article in Trends in Molecular Medicine entitled “Clinical trials of integrative medicine: testing whether magic works?” It was our first foray together into publishing commentary about science-based medicine versus evidence-based medic…
  6. 2015 NHIS Report on Complementary Health Approaches (whatever that means)
    Formerly known as “relaxing,” now known as a “complementary health approach.” Gustav Courbet, “Young ladies on the banks of the Seine,” 1857. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons. Back in 2004, data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) appeared …
  7. Selling “integrative oncology” as a monograph in JNCI
    Sometimes, it’s hard not to get the feeling that my fellow bloggers at Science-Based Medicine and I are trying to hold back the tide in terms the infiltration of pseudoscience and quackery into conventional medicine, a term I like to refer to as quackademic medicine. In most cases, this infil…
  8. Selective pressures on alternative medicine
    (Editor’s note: I was away at Skepticon over the weekend, where I gave a talk entitled “The Central Dogma of Alternative Medicine”. (When the talk’s up on YouTube, I’ll provide a link, of course.) Because of all the fun and travel delays I didn’t get a chance to turn my slides a…
  9. Retconning the story of traditional Chinese medicine
    Retcon (shortened form of RETroactive CONtinuity; first made popular in the comic book world): (original meaning) Adding information to the back story of a fictional character or world, without invalidating that which had gone before. (more common usage) Adding or altering information regarding th…
  10. “Quackery: A $10 Billion Scandal”
    Who would you guess authored a 250-page report which begins with this Preface? This report marks the culmination of an intensive four-year review of quackery and its impact on the elderly. . . As this report details, quackery has traveled far from the day of the pitchman and covered wagon to emerge…
Page 4 of 30 «...23456...»