Posts Tagged Chiropractic

Chiropractors Lobby for Acceptance by the VA and TRICARE



It seems alternative medicine is infiltrating into more and more organizations that should be based on science. We have quackademia in medical schools, integrative medicine clinics in hospitals and medical centers, government funding for alternative medicine research and education, coverage of alternative medicine by government and private health insurance, and acceptance of alternative practitioners in the VA and in military hospitals. Two weeks ago I wrote about an ill-advised effort to get naturopathy into the VA. Now it seems chiropractors have been lobbying to give all veterans and TRICARE beneficiaries access to chiropractic care. On the Society for Science-Based Medicine blog, Jann Bellamy has provided the details.

There are several bills pending: S. 398 and H.R. 1170 for the VA and H.R. 802 for TRICARE. There is also a bill (H.R. 542) that would include chiropractors in the National Health Services Corps. The American Chiropractic Association has issued statements in support of those bills. In their statements, they misrepresent what chiropractic is and what it can do. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Politics and Regulation

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October is National Chiropractic Health Month!

October is National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) and chiropractors can’t resist the opportunity to overstate, obfuscate, and prevaricate in celebration.

They do this in the face of some unfortunate (for them) statistics revealed by a recent Gallup Poll. The Poll was paid for by Palmer College of Chiropractic as part of an effort to increase the chiropractic share of the health care pie. (There is also a secondary analysis of the poll in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics.) We’ll get to those stats in a few minutes.

But first, in celebration of NCHM, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) has produced a set of six graphics chiropractors can download and display. Four of them fudge on the facts. Let’s take a look at these graphics, compare them to the evidence cited in support of their claims, and see where the ACA went astray. (The ACA also hosted a twitter chat yesterday with the hashtag #PainFreeNation.)


The study cited as evidence for this graphic actually compared both manual thrust manipulation (MTM) and mechanical-assisted manipulation (MAM) to each other as well as manipulation versus usual medical care (UMC). Although MAM, such as the Activator Method, is the second most common manipulation technique used by American chiropractors, is increasing in popularity among them, and is touted to be a safe and effective alternative to MTM, this study found that MTM is more effective (at 4 weeks) than MAM and that MAM had no advantage over UMC. But you don’t see that in this graphic.


Posted in: Chiropractic, Clinical Trials, Critical Thinking

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The Enigma of Chiropractic: A Brief Review with a Perspective on Chiropractic as a Specialty

 Subluxation-based chiropractic care is sustained more by faith than by facts.

Subluxation-based chiropractic care is sustained more by faith than by facts

Much of what is discussed in this article has been said before in previous articles I have written for Science-Based Medicine. But since the audience for SBM has greatly increased over the past few years, some subject matter should be repeated for the new readers and researchers coming to this site for reliable information on health care.

Many consumers now search SBM for articles dealing with controversial alternative treatment methods that have been shown to be ineffective or to be loaded with fraud and quackery. Chiropractic in particular continues to be problematic for its failure to renounce the scientifically indefensible, nonfalsifiable subluxation theory that defines the profession as a whole. A review of chiropractic web sites reveals that many chiropractors continue to base their treatment methods on subluxation theory, encompassing a broad scope of health problems. Some chiropractors are now including use of “functional medicine” which uses “natural tools” to treat diabetes, thyroid disease, neuropathy, and other diseases best treated by conventional medical care. Most alarming of all is the treatment of infants and children by “pediatric chiropractors.” Chiropractors are being certified in 10 different specialties, including a diplomate in Diagnosis and Internal Disorders.

As long as chiropractic is licensed as a health-care profession based on subluxation theory or some other unscientific approach, it will continue to be subjected to scrutiny and criticism by the science-based community. It is, in fact, the moral and ethical responsibility of science-based practitioners to oppose any form of unscientific health care, wherever it might exist, separating sense from nonsense without being influenced by politics, special interest, pseudoscience, or belief systems.


Posted in: Chiropractic, Science and Medicine

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Medicine in the Magic Kingdom of Cascadia

Beautiful Cascadia, where science goes to die.

Beautiful Cascadia, where science goes to die.

When the Pacific NW secedes from the Union it is to be part of a new country, Cascadia. The capital would be Portlandia, I suppose. Somehow, I think not. But when I watch the devolution of health care in Oregon, I think back to The Onion (?) when they reported that the United Kingdom was to be sold to Disney, being renamed as “The United Magic Kingdom.”

That is health care in Oregon due the steady insinuation of naturopathy and other pseudomedicine into real health care.

Oregon Health and Pseudoscience University

Growing up my alma mater was the University of Oregon Medical School. Since then it has undergone two name changes, first to Oregon Health Sciences University and then to the current Oregon Health & Sciences University (OHSU)—with, it should be noted, an ampersand. Not an ‘and’.

Perhaps they need one more name change, since they are not always that interested in the “Science” part of their name.

Some background is needed.

Portland has a trifecta of pseudoscience schools: Naturopathic (National College of Natural Medicine), Chiropractic (University of Western States) and ‘Oriental’ (Oregon College of Oriental Medicine).

Lucky us.

As an aside my kids let me know that the word ‘Oriental’ as used to describe people from the East, the term I grew up using, is persona non grata. I understand the reasoning. The proper term, they tell me, is Asian. So I have a mental cringe every time I see the name “Oregon College of Oriental Medicine”.

All three schools are steeped in pseudoscience and pseudomedicine, removed from known reality. As examples, the naturopathic school teaches homeopathy (and more), the chiropractic school teaches the subluxation complex, and the ‘Oriental’ (cringe) school teaches acupuncture. Reading the curricula of the schools suggests that there is no pseudomedical stone left unturned. (more…)

Posted in: Naturopathy, Politics and Regulation, Public Health

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Learning quackery for Continuing Medical Education credit



The Integrative Addiction Conference 2015 (“A New Era in Natural Treatment”) starts tomorrow in Myrtle Beach, SC. Medical doctors, doctors of osteopathy, naturopaths and other health care providers will hear lectures on such subjects as “IV Therapies and Addiction Solutions,” given by Kenneth Proefrock, a naturopath whose Arizona Stem Cell Center specializes in autologous stem cell transplants derived from adipose tissue. Proefrock, who was disciplined for using prolotherapy in the cervical spine without proper credentialing in 2008, claims that stem cells treatments are an “incredibly versatile therapy” and uses them for variety of conditions, such as MS and viral diseases. At the same time, he admits that they are not FDA approved and he is not claiming they are effective for anything (and he’s right), which leads one to wonder why he employs them.

Proefrock also offers a typical naturopathic mish-mash of services, from oncology to urology to “naturopathic endocrinology,” and claims he specializes in treating influenza, high blood pressure and kidney stones, as well as addiction. In other words, he doesn’t seem to be the sort of expert you’d find speaking at a science-based conference on addiction medicine.

You’ll find similarly troubling bios of some of the other speakers, as well as dubious treatments for addiction, on the conference website. Here, for example, are speaker Giordano’s and Eidelman’s websites.

Dalal Akoury, MD, is the “Title Sponsor” of the conference and appears to be running the show. Although she is listed by the S.C. Board of Medicine as board certified in pediatrics, she is the founder of the “Integrative Addiction Institute” and runs the “AwareMed Health and Wellness Resource Center” in Myrtle Beach. Like the Arizona Stem Cell Center, it offers a range of treatments that defy categorization as any particular specialty: addiction recovery, “adrenal fatigue” treatment, stem cells, “anti-aging,” weight loss, “functional medicine” and “integrative cancer care“. Yet, only Akoury and one licensed practical nurse are on the staff of the Center. Again, it is questionable whether she is has sufficient qualifications in addiction medicine to run a conference on the subject. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Cancer, Chiropractic, Dentistry, Diagnostic tests & procedures, Energy Medicine, Homeopathy, Medical Academia, Medical Ethics, Naturopathy

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Do You Believe in Magic? Oregon Does.

Pictured: OHP and HERB picking "evidence-based treatment options"

Pictured: OHP and HERB picking “evidence-based treatment options”

Do You Believe in Magic?

Do you believe in magic for a back pains fix

How the needles can free her, where ever it pricks

And it’s magic, if the chi is groovy

It makes you feel happy like an old-time movie

I’ll tell you about the magic, and it’ll free your soul

But it’s like trying to tell a CAM ’bout randomized control

If you believe in magic don’t bother to choose

Although subluxation is simply a ruse

Just go and get adjusted on the table

It won’t wipe off the pain no matter how hard you try

Your wallet is empty and you can’t seem to find

How you got there, so just blow your mind

If you believe in magic, come along with me

We’ll CAM until morning paid for by the OHP

And maybe, if the CAM is right

I’ll meet you tomorrow, sort of late at night

And we’ll go dancing, baby, then you’ll see

How the magic’s in the CAM and the CAM’s in me

Yeah, do you believe in magic

Yeah, believe in the magic of a back pains fix

Believe in the magic of CAM

Believe in the magic that can set you free

Oh, talking ’bout magic

Do you believe like I believe… Do you believe in magic

Do you believe like I believe… Do you believe, believer

Do you believe like I believe… Do you believe in magic

The Lovin’ Spoonful. Sort-of.

Maybe not my best lyrics.

More Oregon magic

It continues.

Oregon has a problem with prescription pain pills. Oregon leads the nation in the abuse of such drugs, federal statistics show, with Oregon’s rate of prescription drug abuse 39 percent higher than the national average. Go us.

Why that is, I do not know. As an Infectious Disease doctor I prescribe a narcotic about once a year. There are real problems with the treatment of chronic pain and while I am aware of the issues and the changes over the last 25 years, it does not impact my practice, so my knowledge of the issues is basic.

I am also well aware of the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). The OHP was intended to make health care more available to the working poor, while rationing benefits. They were fairly transparent that resources were fixed and not everything would be covered.

Given limited resources, part of the plan has always included a prioritization of treatments and diagnostics, paying for care that give the most bang for the buck. Not a perfect way to ration care and as is always the case, no good deed goes unpunished. (more…)

Posted in: Acupuncture, Chiropractic, Legal, Medical Academia, Naturopathy

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Chiropractic and Stroke: The question is not answered

Extreme rotation of the atlas on the axis (at the atlantoaxial joint) stretches the vertebral artery.  In layman's terms, 40% of a hanging.

Extreme rotation of the atlas on the axis (at the atlantoaxial joint) stretches the vertebral artery. In layman’s terms, 40% of a hanging.

I am off to Chicago for 5 days to wow the SMACC crowd with my ID/SBM acumen. I hope. Given that most of my multiple-personalities do not seem to be able to get any work done, I am forced to write a brief post this week, limited by the battery life on my MacBook Air. Whatever I get down on paper? pixels? RAM? before the battery dies as I fly over the Rockies will be the post. It is times like this I wish I had Gorskian typing skills.

SBM has discussed the many limitations of chiropractic: the low grades for entry into chiropractic school, the inadequate training, their reason d’être, subluxations and their adjustments being divorced from reality, the lack of efficacy of chiropractic for any process beyond low back pain (and even that is no better than safer interventions), the fondness of chiropractors for other useless pseudo-medicines, and their opposition to vaccines.

Hm. When I put it like that chiropractic does appear a little sketchy. But is chiropractic safe? It is a hands-on intervention, for a brief period of time applying the same force to the neck as about 40% of hanging from the neck until dead. So there is certainly the potential for chiropractic to cause harm. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Clinical Trials

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Chiropractic Manipulation of the Neck Linked to Stroke in a 6-Year-Old Child…


The risk of suffering a stroke when undergoing aggressive chiropractic manipulation of the neck is not a new concern. We’ve discussed it several times on the pages of Science-Based Medicine over the years, most recently in November of 2014 when Steven Novella covered the death by chiropractor of 30-year-old Jeremy Youngblood, whose fatal brain injury occurred while seeking treatment for a sore neck. For a nice review of cervical manipulation in general, the evidence against its inappropriate use, and an assessment of the literature on this subject, check out prior posts by Dr. Hall and chiropractor Samuel Homola.

I believe that my take on the issue is in line with my fellow SBM authors. There is no role for high velocity, low amplitude (HVLA) thrust-type maneuvers that cause sudden and intense rotation of the neck in any patient, for any reason. It is not effective for neck pain, headache or any other complaint, and it is a proven risk factor for injury to the vertebral arteries and subsequent stroke. Some patients are at higher risk, such as the elderly or those with atherosclerosis or connective tissue disorders, but this type of injury can occur at any age and even in a perfectly healthy individual. (more…)

Posted in: Chiropractic, Science and Medicine

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Separating Fact from Fiction: The “Magic” of Epigenetics?

Watch as I pull a rabbit out of my hat using the power of epigenetics!

Watch as I pull a rabbit out of my hat using the power of epigenetics!

Every few years, it seems, a new concept emerges as the favorite go-to means of marketing unproven and highly implausible approaches to health care. Explanations of the proposed healing properties of homeopathic remedies incorporating quantum mechanics immediately comes to mind as an example of this phenomenon. Or how proponents of the most absurd treatments will just add “Nano” to anything and claim scientific miracles of healing.

From the Nano SRT website:

Q: What Is Stress Reduction Therapy?
A: SRT is a remarkable new procedure that combines the disciplines of Acupuncture, Biofeedback and Homeopathy with Laser Light technology. A computerized scan or test is done to see what your body is sensitive to, and how it is out of balance, then help it learn not to be.

Q: What does the Nano SRT do?

A: Substance specific frequencies converted to a digital format, and presented in the form of sound and light, are what allow for patient assessment and therapy down to the molecular level. The frequencies are what make it possible to assess thousands of substance sensitivities in mere minutes, then allow the brain and nervous system to record a new association that is positive or neutral instead of the inappropriate ones that were previously stored in memory. This breaks the link between the stimulus and response, makes symptoms unnecessary, creates balance and harmony, from dis-ease and disharmony, and allows the body to function better.


Posted in: Science and Medicine

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The Straw Protocol: A Chiropractor’s Aggressively Promoted Neuropathy Treatment

Full-page ads promoting free dinner seminars addressing the topic of “Non-surgical, drug-free approach to relief from Peripheral [sic] Neuropathy [sic]” appeared last year on at least nine Sundays in the main news section of the print edition of The Los Angeles Times. The seminars were scheduled at various restaurants in Orange County, Los Angeles County, and Inland Empire.

The Los Angeles Times claims a Sunday circulation of 962,192 and a readership of two million for the Sunday main news section. The cost of full-page ads in the main section of Sundays varies, but I was given a quote of $32,500 by an advertising consultant for the paper.

The ads included on their upper left, in small print, the words “HEALTH TODAY” and on the same line—though perhaps less noticeably—at the far right of the page the word “ADVERTISEMENT.” In a much larger font was the headline:

Do You Suffer from One Of These Seven Symptoms Of This Often Misdiagnosed Problem?

It was followed by this subtitle:

Tens of Millions Suffer And Often Don’t Know Where to Turn

The ads indicated that discussion at the seminars would include:

  • What REALLY causes Peripheral [sic] Neuropathy [sic]
  • Three crippling effects of Neuropathy [sic]
  • Dangers associated with medications
  • The Straw Protocol, which utilizes proprietary treatment methods and provides outstanding results for people who suffer from Neuropathy


Posted in: Chiropractic

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