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Medical science policy in the U.S. under Donald Trump

When Dr. Oz met Donald Trump: Somehow this photo just seemed appropriate for this post.

When Dr. Oz met Donald Trump: Somehow this photo just seemed appropriate for this post.

Last week, in an unexpected upset, Donald Trump won the Presidential election in the Electoral College while losing the popular vote and is now President-Elect. Regular readers of my not-so-super-secret other blog know my opinion of this; so I won’t belabor it too much here. If you’re curious, I have written about Donald Trump’s antivaccine views here before in the context of last year’s Republican debates, and, amusingly, I’ve even been at the receiving end of criticism from an “integrative medicine” activist in which my snark was compared to that of Donald Trump and my criticism labeled “Trumpism.” As you might imagine, I was not pleased.

Leaving all that aside and leaving aside how we’ve now had two Presidential elections out of the last five in which the candidate with fewer popular votes became President (no, I’m not a fan of the Electoral College), Donald Trump won fair and square and will be our next President. As an advocate of science-based medicine, naturally I wondered: What can we expect in terms of medical science under President Trump next year? Jann Bellamy already began the discussion on this blog by undertaking a fairly comprehensive overview of the disturbing anti-science positions Donald Trump and many now coming into his new administration espouse. I’m going to do a bit of the same, but I’m going to drill down and focus solely on medical science. While I agree that Trump’s position on human-caused climate change and his stated intent to pull out of important climate treaties and, in essence, cease any attempt to mitigate the effects of human activity on climate change is a looming disaster that our grandchildren and great-grandchildren and beyond will likely curse our generation for, this blog is Science-Based Medicine.
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Posted in: Basic Science, Clinical Trials, Medical devices, Pharmaceuticals, Politics and Regulation

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“Donald Trump’s presidential election win stuns scientists”

Trump is OK with pseudoscience

Trump is OK with pseudoscience

Scientists in the U.S. and from around the world are weighing in on Donald Trump’s election as the next president of the most powerful country on earth:

Trump will be the first anti-science president we have ever had . . . The consequences are going to be very, very severe.

Michael Lubell, director of public affairs for the American Physical Society in Washington, DC:

I am simply stunned. . . Trump’s election does not bode well for science or most anything else of value.

Neal Lane, a Democrat who led the National Science Foundation and served as White House science adviser under President Bill Clinton, now a physicist and university professor at Rice University in Houston, Texas:

It’s going to be critically important for researchers to stand up for science.

Jennifer Zeitzer, director of legislative Relations at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology in Bethesda, Maryland:

I do breast cancer research for my PhD . . . Scared not only for my future but for the future of research and next years @NIH budget.

Sarah Hengel, a graduate student at the University of Iowa in Iowa City:

This is terrifying for science, research, education, and the future of our planet . . . I guess it’s time for me to go back to Europe.

María Escudero Escribano, a postdoc studying electrochemistry and sustainable energy at Stanford University in California:

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Posted in: Critical Thinking, Herbs & Supplements, Legal, Obstetrics & gynecology, Politics and Regulation, Public Health, Science and the Media, Vaccines

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In which we are accused of “polarization-based medicine”

hillary-clinton-donald-trump-presidential-debate

A little over a month ago, I wrote about how proponents of “complementary and alternative medicine” (CAM), now more frequently called “integrative medicine,” go to great lengths to claim nonpharmacological treatments for, well, just about anything as somehow being CAM or “integrative.” The example I used was a systematic review article published by several of the bigwigs at that government font of pseudoscience, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) about CAM approaches for the management of chronic pain. You can read my whole post for yourself if you want the details (and read Edzard Ernst and Steve Novella for more), but the CliffsNotes version consists of two main points. First, the review didn’t really show that any CAM approach worked, given how the authors included so many studies with no placebo or sham control and didn’t systematically assess the quality of the studies. Second, this study is the best publicized example of how NCCIH, looking for a reason to justify itself, has latched on to the opioid addiction crisis in this country and gone “all in” with CAM for chronic pain. Of course, the problem is that none of the real “alternative” treatments show any convincing evidence of efficacy; so NCCIH has to claim exercise (in the form of yoga and Tai Chi, for instance) and various other modalities that aren’t really “alternative” as being part of CAM. True, the authors did try to claim that acupuncture works for back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee, but the flaw of including mostly studies with no placebo/sham control completely undermined that claim. Basically, taken in its entirety, the NCCIH’s systematic review failed to find convincing evidence that any CAM therapy really works for chronic pain.

So I wrote my post, noting also how this review article and its framing of CAM as equivalent to any nonpharmacologic treatment were clearly in line with the last two NCCIH strategic plans, perused the comments our readers left, and pretty much forgot about the study, because fortunately, it didn’t seem to get much traction. (Releasing it right before the Labor Day weekend probably didn’t help NCCIH much.) However, there is one person who did not forget, and that person is John Weeks. Last week, he published a response to the criticisms of the NCCIH review in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (JACM) entitled “Polarization-Based Medicine: Protests Against the Mayo-NCCIH Pain Guidance Evoke the Bigotry of the Political Season.”

As they say, it’s on.
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Posted in: Clinical Trials, Critical Thinking, Medical Academia, Politics and Regulation

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Donald Trump and the dangerous vaccine politics of the 2016 Presidential race

Republican candidates Ben Carson and Donald Trump during the CNN Republican presidential debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015,

Republican candidates Ben Carson and Donald Trump during the CNN Republican presidential debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015

I’ve been writing about vaccines and the antivaccine movement since the turn of the millennium, first in discussion forums on Usenet, then, beginning in 2004, on my first blog (a.k.a. the still existing not-so-super-secret other blog), and finally right here on Science-Based Medicine (SBM) since 2008. Vaccines are one of the most important, if not the most important, topics on a blog like this because (1) arguably no medical intervention has prevented more deaths and suffering throughout history than vaccines; (2) few medical interventions are as safe and effective as vaccines; and (3) there is a vocal and sometimes effective contingent of people who don’t believe (1) and (2), blaming vaccines for all sorts of diseases and conditions to which science, despite many years of study, has failed to link them. The most prominent condition falsely linked to vaccines is, of course, autism, but over the years I’ve written about a host of others, including sudden infant death syndrome, shaken baby syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and even cancer. In a similar vein, antivaccine activists will try to claim that vaccines are loaded with “toxins” or even tainted with fetal “parts” or cells because some vaccines’ manufacturing process involves growing virus in two cell lines that were derived from aborted fetuses many decades ago. Even the Catholic Church doesn’t say that Catholics shouldn’t use these vaccines, but that doesn’t prevent some antivaccine groups from portraying vaccines as virtually being made by scientists cackling evilly as they grind up aborted fetuses to make vaccines. (I exaggerate, but not by much.)

On a strictly scientific, medical level, antivaccine claims such as the ones described above are fringe, crank viewpoints. There is no serious scientific support for any of them and lots of scientific evidence against them, particularly the most persistent myth, namely that vaccines cause autism. It also used to be the case that, politically, antivaccine views tended to be those of the fringe. Unfortunately, in the current election cycle, those fringe views seem to be coming to the fore among prominent candidates for the Republican Presidential nomination. This was most evident at the second Republican Presidential debate last week, where Donald Trump spewed antivaccine tropes and neither of the two physicians also running for the Republican nomination mounted a vigorous defense of vaccines. Even candidates who have previously issued strong statements defending vaccines (Senator Marco Rubio and Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal) remained silent.

(Video of the exchange can be found here.)

How did we get to this point? And why is it that antivaccine views, which in the past were stereotypically associated with crunchy lefties in the mind of the public, seem now to have found another comfortable home among small government conservatives, including the man who currently appears to be the frontrunner for the Republican nomination? In the days that followed the debate, there have been many discussions of Donald Trump’s antivaccine views, but none that take the long view. All seem to flow from the idea that it’s mainly just Donald Trump and his wacky views, rather than Trump being part of a more widespread phenomenon. I’ve frequently said that antivaccine beliefs tend to be the pseudoscience that knows no political boundaries, occurring with roughly equal frequency on the left and the right. However, it’s virtually inarguable that right now, in 2015, the loudest political voices expressing antivaccine views (or at least antivaccine-sympathetic views) are in the Republican Party. Yes, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. is back in a big way, partying like it’s 1999 with Bill Maher over thimerosal-containing vaccines and autism, but neither he nor Bill Maher holds public office or is currently running for office. The über-liberal website The Huffington Post might have been promoting antivaccine propaganda since its inception, but its writers are not running for office, either, and of late it seems to be much less antivaccine than before. (more…)

Posted in: Neuroscience/Mental Health, Politics and Regulation, Vaccines

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Ebola outbreaks: Science versus fear mongering and quackery

Ebola virus particles.jpg
Ebola virus particles” by Thomas W. Geisbert, Boston University School of Medicine – PLoS Pathogens, November 2008 doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1000225. Licensed under CC BY 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.

Without a doubt the big medical story of the last week or so has been the ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, the most deadly in history thus far. Indeed, as of this writing, according to a table of known Ebola outbreaks since 1976 at Wikipedia, in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, the three nations affected thus far, there have been 1,440 cases and 826 deaths. Worse, the World Health Organization (WHO) is reporting that it is spreading faster in Africa than efforts to control it. In particular, late last week it was announced that two Americans who had been infected with Ebola were going to be flown back to the US, specifically to Emory University, for treatment, a development that ramped up the fear and misinformation about Ebola virus to even greater heights than it had already attained, which, unfortunately, were already pretty high. Indeed, the ever-reliably-histrionic Mike Adams of NaturalNews.com wrote a typically hysterical article “Infected Ebola patient being flown to Atlanta: Are health authorities risking a U.S. outbreak?” On Saturday, we learned that Dr. Kent Brantly, an aide worker for Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian charity run by Franklin Graham, son of the well-known preacher, Billy Graham, who had been evacuated from Liberia aboard a private air ambulance, had arrived in Georgia.

This latest development inspired medical “experts,” such as Donald Trump, to stoke fear based on the arrival of two infected Americans in the US. For instance, last Friday, after it was first announced that the Ebola-infected Americans would be flown back to the US, Trump tweeted:

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Posted in: Epidemiology, Health Fraud, Homeopathy, Public Health, Vaccines

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