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The cruel sham that will not die: Right-to-try marches on in California and beyond

The cruel sham that will not die: Right-to-try marches on in California and beyond

We here at SBM, particularly Jann Bellamy and myself, frequently write about naturopathic licensing laws, noting that naturopaths are relentless. They keep trying and trying to get states to pass laws granting their specialty licensure, and, like the Terminator trying to kill Sarah Connor or her son, they absolutely will not stop, ever, until science-based medicine is dead there are naturopathic licensing laws in all 50 states by 2025. Part of their strategy is that they never give up. No matter how many times a given state legislature denies them what they want, they are soon back, and they keep coming back again and again and again and again until they get the law they want passed. It’s the problem with playing defense, naturopaths can fail as many times as they have resources for, defenders of science-based medicine can’t afford to fail once. Worse, once such laws are passed, naturopaths are back again and again and again and again to keep trying to expand their scope of practice. It never ceases to amaze me that physicians’ groups go ballistic protecting their turf when advance practice nurses lobby to expand their scope of practice to encompass what they are trained for but remain more or less silent when naturopathic quacks push to have the state place its imprimatur on their pseudoscience.

Sadly, I’ve come to the conclusion that “right to try” laws are a lot like naturopathic licensing laws in that respect, only worse. Why worse? Unlike naturopathic licensing bills, right-to-try bills rarely die; most of them pass. In fact, only one right-to-try bill that I’m aware of has ever been successfully resisted and blocked from becoming law, and that required a veto by the governor. I’m referring, of course, to the California right-to-try bill vetoed last fall by Governor Jerry Brown. Amazingly, Brown’s veto held. Well, a new right-to-try bill is back in California, less than a year after the old right-to-try law had been vetoed. Passed in the legislature by overwhelming margins, it’s now back on Gov. Brown’s desk, and he has to decide what to do with it.

Its supporters hope that this time will be different, that this time Gov. Brown will sign the bill. They might be right. The rationale Gov. Brown used when vetoing the bill was that he wanted to wait to see what happened with reform of the FDA Expanded Access (sometimes called “Compassionate Use”) program. It’s quite possible that, despite the FDA moving forward with such reform, right-to-try advocates might persuade the governor that it isn’t enough. They’re wrong. In any case, given the resurrection of the California right-to-try law, now seemed like a good time to review what’s been happening with these laws since last year and discuss the situation in California and at the federal level. It isn’t good for patients or drug development. On the other hand, now that it’s been nearly two and a half years since the first right-to-try law was passed in Colorado, we have time to see just what a sham these laws are.

But first, since it’s been nearly a year since I last discussed right-to-try, let’s review why these laws are so pernicious.
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Posted in: Clinical Trials, Ethics, Politics and Regulation

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